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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 118 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 20 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 10 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 23, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10. You can also browse the collection for Monmouth, Ill. (Illinois, United States) or search for Monmouth, Ill. (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

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lentown the British general, fearing danger in crossing the Raritan, decided to march by way of Monmouth to Sandy Hook; and Washington followed him in a parallel line, ready to strike his force at rig at five in the morning of the twenty- 28. eighth, that the British had begun their march from Monmouth, Lee remained inert, till Washington, who was the first to be in motion, sent him orders to attr of independence was translated into English, John Brooks of Massachusetts, who, on the day at Monmouth, was Lee's aide-de-camp, and on the trial was one of his chief witnesses, very emphatically denod service on the field after meeting with Washington. Remarks of John Brooks on the battle of Monmouth; written down by J. Welles. Compare Autograph Memoirs of Lafayette. Steuben: I found General ir march through the Jerseys. In the battle which took its name from the adjacent village of Monmouth, the American generals, except Lee, did well: Wayne especially established his fame. The army