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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 118 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 20 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 10 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 23, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 23, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Monmouth, Ill. (Illinois, United States) or search for Monmouth, Ill. (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: September 23, 1862., [Electronic resource], A heart dislocated on the battle-field. (search)
w the contest the next day He not only made no more attempts to drive us from our position, but abandoned his own in the night, with every appearance, of having despaired of beating us. It was a renewal of the incidents recorded of the battle of Monmouth in the revolutionary war, when our troops slept on their arms, and found the British gone in the morning. Yet Monmouth has always been regarded as an American victory. Our total loss in the battle is set down at 5,000, probably an exaggerated Monmouth has always been regarded as an American victory. Our total loss in the battle is set down at 5,000, probably an exaggerated estimate, which would cover the entire casualties from Sunday to Wednesday night inclusive. That of the enemy is stated by eye-witnesses to have been several times greater. It should not be omitted that McClellan left his dead and wounded behind him — a sure proof that he was defeated. Our people are disappointed because we did not gain a victory as decisive as those around Richmond and at Manassas. They cannot expect such victories always. It should be recollected that the great object