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John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., On the road to Petersburg: notes of an officer of the C. S. A. (search)
is dead at the Yellow Tavern yonder, and sleeps at Hollywood; but as the dying Adams said of Jefferson, he still lives --lives in every heart, the greatest of the Southern cavaliers! His plume still floats before the eyes of the gray horsemen, and history shall never forget him! There was Gordon, too-alive but the other day, now dead and gone whither so many comrades have preceded him. He fell in that same fierce onslaught on the enemy's cavalry, when they tried to enter Richmond by the Brook road, in that sudden attack which saved the capital. I blamed Stuart once for his reckless attack with so small a force as he then had on so large a one as the enemy's, said a most intelligent gentleman of the neighbourhood to me not long since; but now I know that he proved himself here, as everywhere, the great soldier, and that he thereby saved Richmond. And the gallant Gordon! how well I knew him, and how we all loved him! Tall, elegant in person, distinguished in address, with a cha
and one of Gregg's brigades to take advantage of the situation by forming a line of battle on that side of the road. Meanwhile the enemy, desperate but still confident, poured in a heavy fire from his line and from a battery which enfiladed the Brook road, and made Yellow Tavern an uncomfortably hot place. Gibbs's and Devin's brigades, however, held fast there, while Custer, supported by Chapman's brigade, attacked the enemy's left and battery in a mounted charge. Custer's charge, with Cbeaten, and none whatever if I defeated the enemy. In accordance with this view I accepted battle; and the complete repulse of the enemy's infantry, which assailed us from his intrenchments, and of Gordon's cavalry, which pressed Gregg on the Brook road, ended the contest in our favor. The rest of the day we remained on the battle-field undisturbed, and our time was spent in collecting the wounded, burying the dead, grazing the horses, and reading the Richmond journals, two small newsboys
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Kilpatrick's and Dahlgren's raid to Richmond. (search)
Early on Tuesday, March 1st, the column was again in motion, and by 10 o'clock faced the northern lines of Richmond, on the Brook pike, five miles from the city. Its arrival was wholly unexpected; still a telegraphic dispatch that Union cavalry were raiding south of the Rapidan having reached Richmond the day before, General Elzey had that morning, as a precaution, sent out troops to the west of the city under General G. W. C. Lee, and to the north under Colonel Stevens, those sent to the Brook road consisting of five hundred men and six guns. Kilpatrick's advance quickly drove back the pickets of this last force and their supports, and thus found itself lose up to the inner lines of the Richmond defenses. Some skirmishing with artillery firing went, n for several hours, Kilpatriek mean-while awaiting signs of the approach of Dahlgren. The latter officer, on separating from the main body below Spotsylvania, moving south-westerly, had, before noon of the 29th, struck and broken
ng any material damage. It was reported last night, that this column had encamped about five miles from the city, on the Mechanicsville road. In the fight on the Brook road, Colonel Stevens had one man killed and seven wounded. This force of the enemy is variously estimated at from one thousand to five thousand cavalry, and a batrisoners, captured at different points along the line of the enemy's routes, have been brought in. They say that the column of their forces which approached on the Brook road are under General Kilpatrick, and that the column which went into Goochland is commanded by General Gregg. The main body of Kilpatrick's forces crossed the Cthdrew in the direction of Mechanicsville, burning the trestle-work of the Central Railroad across the Chickahominy in their retreat. Our loss in the fight on the Brook road was one killed and six or seven wounded, but we are unable to learn their names. Neither the force nor the loss of the enemy is yet ascertained, as they carr
at Moss and Shinker's Necks to Hamilton's Crossing. They reached this point in the evening, and remained there until May first. Orders were then received to march in a direction leading towards Chancellorsville. The march was continued until night, and resumed early the next morning upon the plank road leading to Orange Court-House. Arriving at the point where Generals Anderson's and McLaws's divisions were in position, we turned to the left by a road leading by Catherine furnace to the Brook road, and thence to the Orange and Fredericksburg plank road, which we followed to the Germana junction. Here the first brigade, under General Paxton, was detached from the division, and ordered to report to Brigadier-General Fitz Lee of the cavalry. This brigade was not engaged during the evening of the second, and did not rejoin the division until next morning. The rest of the division moved on together with the corps, until they had reached a point west of Wilderness Church, and in the
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Vermont Volunteers. (search)
1. 4th Vermont Regiment Infantry. Organized at Brattleboro and mustered in September 21, 1861. Moved to Washington, D. C., September 21-23. Attached to Brook's Brigade, Smith's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 42. 5th Vermont Regiment Infantry. Organized at St. Albans and mustered in September 16, 1861. Moved to Washington, D. C., September 23-25. Attached to Brook's Brigade, Smith's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, al 338. 6th Vermont Regiment Infantry. Organized at Montpelier and mustered in October 15, 1861. Moved to Washington, D. C., October 19-22. Attached to Brook's Brigade, Smith's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade,
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 33: the advance to Culpepper and Bealton. (search)
h is described by Stewart's biographer as a little hamlet consisting of the residence of Stephen McCormick, a post office and a blacksmith's shop. Ewell was closely pressing the rear and left of the corps as it made the crossing, and Job Stewart, who had been caught the day before between two corps of the army and had remained hidden in a thick pine wood during the night, opened with artillery on the larger part of the first division which was massed on a hill back of Auburn; the remainder, Brook's brigade, being thrown out to the front, covered the route to Greenwich, from which direction the rebels were making a heavy pressure, while Carroll's brigade was helping Gregg's cavalry hold them back on the southerly side of the run, in the direction of Warrenton. This fire from Stewart, coming as it did from the rear, on the road to Catlett's Station, over which the corps must pass to Centreville, its objective point, was a genuine surprise and threw the men of the First Division on t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
derate struggle voluntarily, and suffered accordingly. [Charlotte Observer, January 3, 1902.] Brook Church fight, and something about the Fifth North Carolina cavalry. Death of James B. Gordon. He was the Murat of the army of Northern Virginia—The New artillery and its disastrous First experience under Fire—Attack on Kennon's Landing—Sacrifice of men and Horses— shelled with 100-Pounders. The Brook turnpike above Richmond runs almost due north and south. The military road at Brook, or Emmanuel church, strikes it at right angles from the east, in which direction this road crosses the upper Chickahominy at Meadow bridge. In his midnight retreat of May 11th, from Yellow Tavern, General Sheridan took this military road at Brook Church to escape, intending to cross the Chickahominy and move to his right from there to the James. And this he did, but he assuredly had an awful time of it and a narrow escape at Brook church. Early on the morning of the 12th, Colonel Jame
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Brook Church fight, and something about the Fifth North Carolina cavalry. (search)
Brook Church fight, and something about the Fifth North Carolina cavalry. Death of James B. Gordon. He was the Murat of the army of Northern Virginia—The New artillery and its disastrous First experience under Fire—Attack on Kennon's Landing—Sacrifice of men and Horses— shelled with 100-Pounders. The Brook turnpike above Richmond runs almost due north and south. The military road at Brook, or Emmanuel church, strikes it at right angles from the east, in which direction this road crosses the upper Chickahominy at Meadow bridge. In his midnight retreat of May 11th, from Yellow Tavern, General Sheridan took this military road at Brook Church to escape, intending to cross the Chickahominy and move to his right from there to the James. And this he did, but he assuredly had an awful time of it and a narrow escape at Brook church. Early on the morning of the 12th, Colonel James B. Gordon was in his rear at Brook Church. Sheridan was met by our forces of cavalry and infan
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Charlestown Schools in the 18th century. (search)
Attest, N. Dows, Recorder.’ January 21 following, this committee ‘made return that they had agreed with Mr. Thomas Tufts to keep sd school for one year to perfect Children in Reading & to Learn them to write & Cipher, and to Teach them Gramer, for £ 40 per annum, & to begin his work the last day of June.’ At the next May meeting (1704) £ 28 was voted ‘for the schoolmaster to make up his Sallery to £ 40.’ We have not attempted to verify the account of Thomas Tufts, to be found in Brook's History of Medford, and Wyman's Charlestown Genealogies. He graduated from Harvard College in the class of 1701. While there he received £ 40 per year, by the terms of his grandfather's will. (This was as good as teaching school!) He was the son of Peter Tufts, Jr., (styled ‘Capt. Peter’). His mother's maiden name was Elizabeth Lynde. He was born in Medford, March 31, 1683, and married for his first wife, his cousin, Mary Lynde. She died September 3, 1718, and the following
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