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Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 4 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Stichus, or The Parasite Rebuffed (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
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T. Maccius Plautus, Stichus, or The Parasite Rebuffed (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 5, scene 4 (search)
ur way to shirk your drink. Take your pipesTake your pipes: The "Tibicines," "Pipers" or "flute-players," among the Greeks and Romans, were in the habit of playing upon two pipes at the same time. These were perfectly distinct, and were not even, as has been supposed by some, connected by a common mouth-piece. The Romans were particularly fond of this music, and it was introduced both at sacrifices, funerals, and entertainments. See a comical story about the Roman "Tibicines" in the Fasti of Ovid, B. 6, l. 670 et seq. From the present specimen they appear to have been merry souls, occupying much the same place as the country fiddlers of modern times. out of your mouth. The PIPER drinks. STICHUS When he has drunk, either do you mind my rulesMind my rules: It is pretty clear, that in his zeal, and to show that there is no flagging in him, Sagarinus has been overdoing it, perhaps helping himself out of his turn; on this, the other threatens to resign his office of master of the ceremoni
Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 1 (search)
rais'd The countenance of man erect to heav'n, Gazing sublime, while prone to earth he bent Th' inferior tribes, reptiles, and pasturing herds, And beasts of prey, to appetite enslav'd? "When Nature," says Cicero, de Legg. i. 9, "had made other animals abject, and consigned them to the pastures, she made man alone upright, and raised him to the contemplation of heaven, as of his birthplace and former abode;" a passage which Dryden seems to have had in his mind when he translated the lines of Ovid cited above. Let us add Juvenal, xv. 146: Sensum à cælesti demissum traximus arce, Cujus egent prona et terram spectantia. To us is reason giv'n, of heav'nly birth, Denied to beasts, that prone regard the earth. and subservient to appetite. All our power is situate in the mind and in the body.All our power is situate in the mind and in the body] Sed omnis nostra vis in animo et corpore sita. All our power is placed, or consists, in our mind and our body. The particle sed, which is merely a c
Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 2 (search)
rcised the mind, others the body. At that period, however,At that period, however] Et jam tum. "Tunc temporis præcisè, at that time precisely, which is the force of the particle jam, as Donatus shows. * * * I have therefore written et jam separately. * * * Virg. Æn. vii. 737. Late jam tum ditione premebat Sarrastes populos." Cortius. the life of man was passed without covetousness Without covetousness] Sine cupiditate. " As in the famous golden age. See Tacit. Ann. iii. 26." Cortius. See also Ovid. Met. i. 89, seq. But "such times were never," as Cowper says. every one was satisfied with his own. But after Cyrus in AsiaBut after Cyrus in Asia, etc.] Postea verò quàm in, Asiâ Cyrus, etc. Sallust writes as if he had supposed that kings were more moderate before the time of Cyrus. But this can hardly have been the case. " The Romans," says De Brosses, whose words I abridge, " though not learned in antiquity, could not have been ignorant that there were great conquerors before Cyrus; as Ni<