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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 8 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance of the Army-crossing the Colorado-the Rio Grande (search)
tachment; and Major [Trueman] Cross, the assistant quartermaster-general, had also been killed not far from camp. There was no base of supplies nearer than Point Isabel on the coast, north of the mouth of the Rio Grande and twenty-five miles away. The enemy, if the Mexicans could be called such at this time when no war had bspared. I have already said that General Taylor's whole command on the Rio Grande numbered less than three thousand men. He had, however, a few more troops at Point Isabel or Brazos Santiago. The supplies brought from Corpus Christi in wagons were running short. Work was therefore pushed with great vigor on the defences, to enaing, was marched in to garrison it, with some few pieces of artillery. All the supplies on hand, with the exception of enough to carry the rest of the army to Point Isabel, were left with the garrison, and the march was commenced [May 1] with the remainder of the command, every wagon being taken with the army. Early on the secon
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Political Intrigue — Buena Vista — movement against Vera Cruz-siege and capture of Vera Cruz (search)
. This being refused by Congress, the President asked legislative authority to place a junior over a senior of the same grade, with the view of appointing Benton to the rank of major-general and then placing him in command of the army, but Congress failed to accede to this proposition as well, and Scott remained in command: but every general appointed to serve under him was politically opposed to the chief, and several were personally hostile. General Scott reached Brazos Santiago or Point Isabel, at the mouth of the Rio Grande, late in December, 1846, and proceeded at once up the river to Camargo, where he had written General Taylor to meet him. Taylor, however, had gone to, or towards Tampico [to Victoria], for the purpose of establishing a post there. He had started on this march before he was aware of General Scott being in the country. Under these circumstances Scott had to issue his orders designating the troops to be withdrawn from Taylor, without the personal consultatio
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
ssels, daring as any adventurers in the days of Drake or Frobisher, is of the greatest interest. The careers of the Sumter and the brig Jefferson Davis, the Amelia, the Dixie, the Petrel, the Bonita, the James Gray, and many others would A pursuer of many prizes — the Santiago de Cuba This vigilant blockader was one of the first to see active service. As early as December 3, 1861, Commander D. B. Ridgely brought her ten guns to bear upon the schooner Victoria and captured her off Point Isabel on her way to the West Indies with a cargo of cotton. In February of the next year, the Santiago caught the sloop O. K. off Cedar Keys, Florida. The next month she drove a blockade-runner ashore. On April 23, 1862, she captured two schooners and (two days later) a steamer, all on their way from Charleston loaded with cotton. On April 30th she added to her prizes the schooner Maria, and on May 27th the schooner Lucy C. Holmes, both with more cotton; on August 3, 1862, at sea, the stea
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brown, Fort, (search)
aylor immediately after his arrival at the river opposite Matamoras with a part of the army of occupation (March 29, 1846), and was designed to accommodate 2,000 men. It was placed in command of Major Brown. Taylor was ordered by General Ampudia, commander of the Mexican forces at Matamoras, to withdraw within twenty-four hours, as he claimed the territory around Fort Brown belonged to the Department of Tamaulipas. a part of Mexico. Taylor refused to do so: and when he had gone hack to Point Isabel with a part of his forces, leaving Major Brown in command. Arista crossed the river with some troops to attack the fort. His army was hourly increasing in strength. On the night of May 4 the Mexicans erected a battery behind the fort. and early the next morning opened a heavy fire from it upon the fortification. At the same time the batteries at Matamoras, which had fired upon the fort on the 3d, hurled shot and shell, but with little effect, for Brown had erected bomb-proof shelter.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mexico, War with (search)
uted territory between Texas and the neighboring province of Tamaulipas. When he encamped at Point Isabel, March 25, on the coast, 28 miles from Matamoras, Taylor was warned by the Mexicans that he was upon foreign soil. He left his stores at Point Isabel, under a guard of 450 men, and with the remainder of his army advanced to the bank of the Rio Grande, where he established a camp and began thsition of the Army of Occupation became critical. Parties of armed Mexicans soon got between Point Isabel and Fort Brown and cut off all intercommunication. A reconnoitring party under Captain Thornhen Lieutenant Mason was killed. Having completed his fort, Taylor hastened to the relief of Point Isabel, May 1, which was menaced by a Mexican force, 1,500 strong, collected in the rear. He reached Point Isabel the same day. This departure of Taylor from the Rio Grande emboldened the Mexicans, who opened fire upon Fort Brown, May 3, from Matamoras, and a large body crossed the river to attack
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Polk, James Knox 1795-1849 (search)
ic and the United States as peaceful unless she should declare war or commit acts of hostility indicative of a state of war. He was specially directed to protect property and respect personal rights. The army moved from Corpus Christi on March 11, and on the 28th of that month arrived on the left bank of the Del Norte opposite to Matamoras, where it encamped on a commanding position, which has since been strengthened by the erection of field-works. A depot has also been established at Point Isabel, near the Brazos Santiago, 30 miles in rear of the encampment. The selection of his position was necessarily confided to the judgment of the general in command. The Mexican forces at Matamoras assumed a belligerent attitude, and on April 12 General Ampudia, then in command, notified General Taylor to break up his camp within twenty-four hours, and to retire beyond the Nueces River, and in the event of his failure to comply with these demands announced that arms, and arms alone, must d