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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Reynolds' last battle. (search)
orders. At the moment that his body was taken to the rear, for his death was instantaneous, two of his most gallant staff officers, Captain Riddle and Captain Wadsworth, in pursuance of his directions, effected a slight movement which made prisoners of Archer's Brigade, so that the rebel prisoners went to the rear almost at the same time, and their respectful conduct was in itself the highest tribute they could pay to him who had thus fallen. While his body lay in the little house on the Emmetsburg road, which he had passed in such full life only a few short hours before, Major Baird, his Assistant Adjutant General, was practically carrying out his orders in the disposition of the troops as they came up, and General Hofmann, whose Fifty-sixth Pennsylvania had made the first onset, was supported by Wadsworth, himself in the far front, until other regiments could be deployed and the line taken. From the extreme left, where Colonel Chapman Biddle, in charge of the brigade, and Colonel
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
umstances, the agreement between Wellington and Blucher to concentrate their two armies-nearly double the number of Napoleon-far to the rear, in the vicinity of Waterloo, has been esteemed a proof of their great ability. On June 30th, General Meade had sent General Reynolds, who commanded the left wing of our army, to Gettysburg, with orders to report to him concerning the character of the ground there, at the same time ordering General Humphreys to examine the ground in the vicinity of Emmetsburg. But while thus active in his endeavors to ascertain the nature of the several positions where he could fight Lee, he, at the same time, continued to press forward his army, and concentrate it so that he could with ease move it toward any point. On the morning of July 1st, our advance, consisting of the First and Eleventh Corps, under General Reynolds, arrived at Gettysburg, and there found Buford's Division of cavalry already engaged with the enemy. Reynolds, with that quickness of per
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
lowest. We had learned on the night of the 1st, from some prisoners captured near Seminary Ridge, that the First, Eleventh, and Third Corps had arrived by the Emmetsburg road, and had taken position on the heights in front of us, and that reinforcements had been seen coming by the Baltimore road, just after the fight of the 1st.lematical one. My orders from General Lee were to envelop the enemy's left, and begin the attack there, following up, as near as possible, the direction of the Emmetsburg road. My corps occupied our right, with Hood on the extreme right, and McLaws next. Hill's Corps was next to mine, in front of the Federal centre, and Ewellng could stop my men, however, and they commenced their heroic charge up the side of Cemetery Ridge. Our attack was to progress in the general direction of the Emmetsburg road, but the Federal troops, as they were forced from point to point, availing themselves of the stone fences and boulders near the mountain as rallying points
wild whoo! made one continuous song through the sultry noon. Forth from the canopy of smoke and their screen of trees, comes the chosen storming party-Pickett's division of Virginians; supported on the right by Wilcox and on the left by Heth's division under Pettigrew, its own general having been wounded in the head the day before. Unmindful of the fire-sheeted storm into which they march-down into the Valley of the Shadow of Death stride that devoted band. Now, they emerge into the Emmetsburg road, straight on for the coveted heights. On! never blenching, never faltering — with great gaps crashing through them-filling the places of the dead with the living next to die-On! into the jaws of death goes the forlorn hope! They are at the rise — they reach the crest; and then their batteries are suddenly silent! Behind them is the ghastly road, furrowed and ploughed by ceaseless shot, slippery with blood and dotted thick with their writhing, bleeding brothers. Behind them is
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, July, 1863. (search)
we were almost beyond the lines, and were exposed to the enemy's cavalry. At 1 P. M. I met a quantity of Yankee prisoners who had been picked up straggling. They told me they belonged to Sickles's corps (3d, I think), and had arrived from Emmetsburg during the night. About this time skirmishing began along part of the line, but not heavily. At 2 P. M. General Longstreet advised me, if I wished to have a good view of the battle, to return to my tree of yesterday. I did so, and remainehis wagons, and refused to be comforted by General Lee. I joined Longstreet again, and, mounted on Lawley's venerable horse, started at 3 P. M. to ride through the pass. At 4 P. M. we stopped at a place where the roads fork, one leading to Emmetsburg, and the other to Hagerstown. Major Moses and I entered a farm-house, in which we found several women, two wounded Yankees, and one dead one, the result of this morning's skirmish. One of the sufferers was frightfully wounded in the head; the
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIX. October, 1862 (search)
rovement, at all events, on the late mode of sending out spies-they cannot get passports for bribes now, without Smith's adjutant knowing something about it. Heretofore the Plug Uglies might take the bribe, and by their influence with Gen. Winder, obtain his signature to a blank passport. The following was received yesterday: Winchester, Va., Oct. 14, 1862. Hon. G. W. Randolph. The cavalry expedition to Pennsylvania has returned safe. They passed through Mercersburg, Chambersburg, Emmetsburg, Liberty, New Market, Syattstown, and Burnesville. The expedition crossed the Potomac above Williamsport, and recrossed at White's Ford, making the entire circuit, cutting the enemy's communications, destroying arms, etc., and obtaining many recruits. R. E. Lee, General. Thus, Gen. Stuart has made another circle round the enemy's army; and hitherto, every time he has done so, a grand battle followed. Let McClellan beware! A letter, just received from Gen. Lee, says there is n
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Supplement to General Early's Review.-reply to General Longstreet. (search)
es commonly moved, and he determined to give battle. There is a foot note to this statement as follows: This and subsequent revelations of the purposes and sentiments of Lee I derive from General Longstreet, who, in a full and free conversation with the writer after the close of the war, threw much light on the motives and conduct of Lee during this campaign. On pages 340-1, he says: Longstreet, holding the right of the Confederate line, had one flank securely posted on the Emmetsburg road, so that he was really between the Army of the Potomac and Washington, and by marching towards Frederick could undoubtedly have manceuvered Meade out of the Gettysburg position. This operation Gen. Longstreet, who foreboded the worst from an attack on the army in position, and was anxious to hold General Lee to his promise, begged in vain to be allowed to execute. To this there is a foot note as follows: The officer named is my authority for this statement. On page 358 t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
roblematical one. My orders from General Lee were to envelop the enemy's left and begin the attack there, following up as near as possible the direction of the Emmetsburg road. My corps occupied our right, with Hood on our extreme right and McLaws next. Hill's corps was next to mine, in front of the Federal centre, and Ewell ng could stop my men, however, and they commenced their heroic charge up the side of Cemetery Ridge. Our attack was to progress in the general direction of the Emmetsburg road, but the Federal troops, as they were forced from point to point, availing themselves of the stone fences and boulders near the mountain as rallying points If, therefore, we had drawn everything up on the night of the 1st and made a concentrated move on the morning of the 2d by our right flank, so as to seize the Emmetsburg road, we should either have been attacked or we should have dislodged General Meade from his position. The attack was of all things that which we most desired
oceed to our extreme right and attack up the Emmetsburg road. McLaws moved off, and I followed witheceived were to place my division across the Emmetsburg road, form line of battle, and attack. Befoat direction. As soon as I arrived upon the Emmetsburg road, I placed one or two batteries in positt were, a concave line, as approached by the Emmetsburg road. A considerable body of troops was posted in front of their main line, between the Emmetsburg road and Round Top Mountain. This force wasthe attack according to orders, viz.: up the Emmetsburg road, I should have first to encounter and dmportant facts so shortly after reaching the Emmetsburg road, that I considered it my duty to report, General Lee's orders are to attack up the Emmetsburg road. I sent another officer to say that I s, General Lee's orders are to attack up the Emmetsburg road. During this interim I had continued te, General Lee's orders are to attack up the Emmetsburg road. Almost simultaneously, Colonel Fairfa[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg. (search)
and the remainder (Jenkins' and Chambliss' brigades) under my immediate command, was directed to proceed by way of Emmetsburg, Maryland, so as to guard the other flank. I dispatched Captain Blackford, corps engineer, to General Robertson, to inform him of my movement, and direct his co-operation, as Emmetsburg was in his immediate front, and was probably occupied by the enemy's cavalry. It was dark before I had passed the extreme right of our line, and, having to pass through very dense woods,ours, when, having secured a good guide, and it becoming more light, the march was resumed, and just at dawn we entered Emmetsburg. We there learned that a large body of the enemy's cavalry (the citizens said 15,000, which I knew, of course, was exaproceed by way of Cavetown, by which I might intercept the enemy, should he pass through (Eiler's Gap. In and around Emmetsburg we captured sixty or seventy prisoners of war, and some valuable hospital stores en route from Frederick to the army.
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