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Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 134 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 27 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 18 18 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Fort Scott (Kansas, United States) or search for Fort Scott (Kansas, United States) in all documents.

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so at Oxford, Santa Fe, and other polls held just along the border, where they could suddenly concentrate force enough to make the operation a tolerably safe one. But Southern Kansas was still very thinly settled, in part by Missourians; while Fort Scott, a military post and land-office in the heart of that section, afforded a nucleus and a rallying-point for pro-Slavery terrorism. The Missourians, recognizing and acting under the Territorial Legislature and local officers created by the Bordeing and scouting those elections and their fruits, were regarded and treated, not only by the pro-Slavery party on either side of the border, but by the Federal Administration and its instruments in Kansas, as outlaws and criminals. At length, Fort Scott itself was captured Dec. 15, 1858. by Montgomery, Since, Colonel of the First South Carolina (Colored) Volunteers. one of the boldest of the Free-State leaders, who, with 150 men, entered it by night, made temporary prisoners of its digni
seen. Gen. Price, very naturally, did not see fit to await the fulfillment of Gen. Fremont's programme. Though abandoned by McCulloch, with the bulk of the Confederate army, he moved northward from Springfield about the middle of August, receiving reenforcements continually, and, deflecting to the west as he advanced, pushed back a far inferior force of Unionists under Gen. Lane, after a little brush, at the crossing of a stream known as Dry Wood, and sent a detachment to and occupied Fort Scott, on the edge of Kansas, which was found evacuated. Thence, advancing north by east unopposed, he reached Warrensburg on the 10th of September, and, on the 11th, drew up before Lexington. A young city of five or six thousand inhabitants, the capital of Lafayette County, situated on the south bank of the Missouri, 240 miles west of St. Louis, and 50 or 60 from the nearest point on the North Missouri Railroad, or on that portion of the Pacific Road yet completed. Tile river was then at
ckens, Fla., occupied by Lieut. Slemmer, 412; order of Bragg, 436; President's Message, 556; Rebel attack on Santa Rosa Island, etc., 601-602. Fort Pike, seized by Louisiana troops, 412. Fort Pulaski, seized by Georgia troops, 411. Fort Scott, Kansas, captured by Montgomery, 285; occupied by Gen. Price, 585. Fort Smith, Ark., seized by Solon Borland, 488. Fort St. Philip, seized by Louisiana, 412. Fort Sumter, 407; Major Anderson takes possession of; what the Charleston papers unded at Wilson's Creek, 597. Mobile, Ala., declaration of causes, etc., at, 355; 407: seizure of the Federal Arsenal at, 412; surrender of the cutter Cass at. 413. Mobile Advertiser, The, citation from, 459. Montgomery, Col., captures Fort Scott, 185. Monroe, Jas., 75; 108-9-10; 154; 175; 266; 267. Monroe, Thos. B., sr., of Ky., 614; becomes a member of the Rebel Congress and a Senator, 617. Monroe, Thos. B., Jr., 614. Montreal, the sheriff of, tempted to engage in slave-