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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 134 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 27 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 18 18 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fort Scott (Kansas, United States) or search for Fort Scott (Kansas, United States) in all documents.

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. Phillips, at Fort Lincoln, perfecting themselves in drill. On the twenty-sixth of October, Captain Seamen received an order from Major Henning, commanding at Fort Scott, to take such a force as he could raise and proceed to a point on the Osage, Bates County, Mo., and there break up a gang of bushwhackers. We marched from Fortunted men, we sent to the organized militia companies, also to Colonel Adams, commanding the Twelfth regiment, to camp at Fort Lincoln, and to Major Henning, at Fort Scott. We requested the latter to send what reenforcecnents he could along the south side of the Osage River, to Burnett's Ferry. Our intention was to skirmish withses of Union men taken, and the provisions, clothing, and bedding taken from their families. Several urgent requests were made to the military authorities at Fort Scott for aid, and on Sunday last Major Henning ordered Captain Seamen, with a force of four or five companies of blacks, (infantry,) consisting of some two hundred a
ised, by telegraph from Elkhorn, of his progress. The Second and Third brigades of the First division, with my headquarters, were at Cane Hill; the First brigade at Rhea's Mills, eight miles north, where a large supply-train, just arrived from Fort Scott, was halted. My pickets were advanced six miles beyond Cane Hill, on the road leading to Van Buren, and a strong outpost of the Kansas Second established where that road intersects the Cove Creek road, running from Fayetteville to Van Buren,s of the Kansas division occupied Cane Hill, eighteen miles south-west of Fayetteville, the First brigade (Gen. Salomon's) being left eight miles back north (at this point) to protect the large subsistence trains that had recently come in from Fort Scott. For a few days immediately following the Cane lill victory, it was perhaps as quiet there as the telegraphic despatches have been in the habit of reporting it, usually, along the Potomac, during some eighteen months past. But it was a quie