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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 20 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 2 0 Browse Search
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defending the cause of secession and pointing out the way to the success of the southern rebellion.--(Doc. 83.) This morning a young man presented himself at the quarters of one of the Pennsylvania Regiments, near Shuter's Hill, opposite Washington, dressed in a suit of blue navy flannel, surmounted with a lieutenant's epaulettes, and introduced himself as Lieut. Smith of Company A, 6th Massachusetts Regiment. Not being suspected at the time, He was allowed to inspect the works at Fort Ellsworth, and to witness the departure of the Zouaves toward Fairfax. Not until he had safely returned to Washington and been carried by the cars some miles on the road to Baltimore, was it discovered that a secessionist had been in camp.--N. Y. Tribune, July 13. The companies sent to the relief of Col. Smith, at Monroe, Missouri, returned to Hannibal this evening, and report the road unobstructed between Hannibal and Monroe. On arriving at the latter place, they formed a junction with Col
voyages to Savannah since the blockade.--N. Y. Commercial, November 27. Lieutenant George W. Snyder, of the U. S. Engineers, first assistant to General Barnard on the construction of the forts on the line of the Potomac, died at Washington, D. C., to-day, of typhoid fever. He was one of the garrison at Fort Sumter, from its occupation by Major Anderson until its evacuation, and during the bombardment commanded a portion of the men. His gallant conduct elicited the highest praise. Fort Ellsworth and six other fortifications, opposite Washington, were constructed under his direction. He was but twenty-eight years of age, but was one of the most talented members of the engineer corps. He graduated at the head of his class, and was thereupon appointed an instructor at West Point in the engineering department. Subsequently, on entering the army, he was employed in the fortification of Pickens, at Pensacola, and other forts. He had charge of the landing of the first troops at Ann
rmy under Gen. McDowell, into the place about which so much has latterly been written and said. Two or three random shots were fired from the woods as we approached the village, wounding an officer and two privates, but not seriously. These shots were discharged by rebels who were mounted, and who fled before they could be reached. The so-called fortifications of the enemy at Fairfax are about as much like those erected by Corcoran's Irish Regiment at Arlington, and those built at Fort Ellsworth by the New York Zouaves, as a peach is like a mule's head! They are entirely fabulous, comparatively, and are of no account whatever. If such be the character of all the rebel intrenchments, they will occasion us little trouble. Guards of our troops were promptly stationed around the town, and especially about the Court House, of which you have heard so much. The two Rhode Island Regiments, with James's rifled cannon batteries, the New Hampshire Second, the New York Seventy-first, an
all the way; and we took some extra exercise, chasing a bullock or two, straying off into the woods. I think we saved our Uncle Samuel one stout animal, and fairly earned a beefsteak, which is hereby freely waived in behalf of privates A and B, who are probably as hungry as we. As day dawned, we caine up with a female equestrian, probably a nurse, who walked her horse leisurely by the wagons. Soon we observed camps near the road, over which waved the Stars and Stripes; the ramparts of Fort Ellsworth on a hill commanding the road into Alexandria, were occupied by men, busy apparently in placing their guns in range; and at the outer picket near the town, another platoon from the garrison were arguing the point with fugitive soldiers who were asking admittance. Even at this time only the wagons and the disabled men seemed to be allowed to pass: able-bodied soldiers were very properly stopped outside. Our pass was promptly honored as usual. At the first chance for a cup of coffee — a
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Incidents of the retreat after the panic was stopped. (search)
all the way; and we took some extra exercise, chasing a bullock or two, straying off into the woods. I think we saved our Uncle Samuel one stout animal, and fairly earned a beefsteak, which is hereby freely waived in behalf of privates A and B, who are probably as hungry as we. As day dawned, we caine up with a female equestrian, probably a nurse, who walked her horse leisurely by the wagons. Soon we observed camps near the road, over which waved the Stars and Stripes; the ramparts of Fort Ellsworth on a hill commanding the road into Alexandria, were occupied by men, busy apparently in placing their guns in range; and at the outer picket near the town, another platoon from the garrison were arguing the point with fugitive soldiers who were asking admittance. Even at this time only the wagons and the disabled men seemed to be allowed to pass: able-bodied soldiers were very properly stopped outside. Our pass was promptly honored as usual. At the first chance for a cup of coffee — a
e Board of Survey, or inspection report, will be furnished the commissary receiving the condemned stores. X. Payment for the rations saved by companies, as directed in General Orders No. 82, September 23, 1861, from the War Department, will be made only by the officers or agents in charge of the principal subsistence depots within this command. XI. The works in the vicinity of Washington are named as follows: The work south of Hunting Creek, Fort Lyon. That on Shuter's Hill, Fort Ellsworth. That to the left of the Seminary, Fort worth. That in front of Blenker's brigade, Fort Blenker. That in front of Lee's house, Fort Ward. That near the mouth of Four Mile Creek, Fort Scott. That on Richardson's Hill, Fort Richardson. That now known as Fort Albany, Fort Albany. That near the end of the Long Bridge, Fort Runyon. The work next on the right of Fort Albany, Fort Craig. The work next on the right of Fort Craig, Fort Tillinghast. The work next on t
nia side was not much better than on the other. The troops were on the river-banks or on the high ground immediately overlooking them. Few were in condition to fight, and but little had been done in the way of entrenching the approaches. Fort Ellsworth, near Alexandria; Forts Runyon and Allan, at the end of the Long Bridge; Fort Corcoran, at the head of Aqueduct Bridge, with one or two small adjacent batteries, comprised all the works completed on the south side. A small battery at the Mar Mills, in the valley of Four-Mile Run. Gens. Franklin's and Heintzelman's brigades were in front of Alexandria, in the vicinity of the Seminary. Kearny's brigade was at Cloud's Mills, on the Annandale turnpike. One regiment was stationed at Fort Ellsworth, immediately in front of Alexandria. I had thus provided against all eventualities as well as the means in my possession permitted. If the enemy confined himself to a direct advance the probable points of attack were held by eight brigade
's Ferry, Va., 183-190. Emancipation premature, 33 ; how accomplished, 34. Emory, Gen. W. H., at Williamsburg, 321, 322, 324, 325 ; Hanover C. H., 370, 372. Ewell, Gen. R. S., 650. Fairchild, Col., 578. Fairfax Court-House, Va., 224, 225, 515, 518, 519, 526. Fair Oaks, Va., battle of, 377-384. Farnsworth, Col , 340. 341. Farquhar, Capt. F. U., 124. Fisher's creek, Va., 260. Ford, Col., 558. Forsyth, Capt. J. W., 133. Fort Corcoran, Va., 68, 79, 80, 516, 519 536. Fort Ellsworth, Va., 68, 80. Fort Lyon, Va., 96. Fort Macon, N. C., 244, 245. Fort Magruder, Va., 272, 301, 321-325. Fortress Monroe, Va., 102, 155, 163-165, 235, 239, 248, 251-257, 274, 275, 275, 283, 446, 448, 449, 468, 483 498, 499 502 507. Fort Runyon, Va., 68, 80. Fort Sumter, surrenders, 39 ; excitement, 40. Fowler, Lieut.-Col., 521. Frank, Col., 596. Frank, Capt., 599. Franklin, Gen. W. B., at Washington, 1861, 80, 81, 95. 96, 116, 138, 156, 157. In Peninsula, 262, 265 ; West Point, 2
, 1862, and Petersburg, June, 1864 to April, 1865. Fort Richardson lay on the Virginia line of the Washington defenses about halfway between Fort Corcoran and Fort Ellsworth, in front of Alexandria. Its smooth-bore armament consisted of three 24-pounders on siege carriages en barbette, two 24-pounders on barbette carriages en embwater to Alexandria. The nearness of Alexandria, and the fact that it commanded the river, made its occupation a matter of prime importance from the outset. Fort Ellsworth, on Shuter's Hill, one half-mile west of the town, was located and fortified by the column crossing by water. During the eight weeks following the crossing, d for isolated defense. Fort Runyon was overlooked by the heights of Arlington, as was Fort Corcoran, though the latter was better situated than the former. Fort Ellsworth was but a weak field-fortification. The main efforts of the officers were to strengthen the Alexandria, Va. When Brigadier-General Herman Haupt was
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Kansas, 1865 (search)
1865 Dec. 4: Skirmish, Cow Creek near Fort ZarahIOWA--7th Cavalry (Detachment). Jan. 7-11: Scout from Fort EllsworthINDEPENDENT SCOUTS (Detachment). Jan. 15-21: Scout from Fort Larned to Pawnee Fork, Walnut Creek and Smoky Hill RiverINDEPENDENT SCOUTS. Jan. 20: Skirmish, Point of Rocks or Nine Mile Ridge near Fort LarnedCOLORADO--1st and 2d Cavalry (Detachments). Jan. 31: Skirmish near OxfordKANSAS--5th Cavalry (Detachment). Feb. 1: Skirmish, Fort ZarahCOLORADO--2d Cavalry (Co. "C"). Feb. 3-8: Scout from Fort Larned to South Fork Pawnee Creek and Buckner's RanchINDEPENDENT SCOUTS (Detachment). Feb. 12-20: Operations about Forts Riley and LarnedINDEPENDENT SCOUTS. Feb. 16-21: Scout from Fort LarnedINDEPENDENT SCOUTS. March 7: Skirmish near Fort LarnedAttack on train. March 9-15: Scout from Fort Larned to Crooked CreekCOLORADO--2d Cavalry (Detachment). April 22: Affair near Fort ZarahCOLORADO--2d Cavalry (Detachment). May 20: Affair near Pawnee RockCOLORADO--2d Cavalry (Deta
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