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January 12. A party of rebels, belonging to the command of Colonel Hammond, burned the depot and a blacksmith's shop, and took all the goods from the store of Mr. Mustain, at Horse Cave, Ky. They also burned the Woodland Depot at Cave City, the Cave City Hotel, and stables. The citizens at all those points were notified, and escaped to Munfordville, as the rebels stated that they intended to return on Monday night and burn every house that could be used by the Union army in its advance as a hospital or quarters. They also burned up all the hay, oats, and fodder-stacks along the road, and drove off or killed all the cattle, horses, and mules to be found. A nephew of the rebel General Polk was arrested to-day near Blandville, Ky., by one of the National scouting parties. He had despatches in his possession to spies at Columbus, Ky.--N. Y. Herald, January 14. The United States sloop-of-war Pensacola ran the rebel batteries at Cockpit and Shipping Points, on the Potoma
-day the National forces took possession of the fortifications and raised the flag of the United States. One hundred and forty of Morgan's cavalry at noon to-day captured forty-eight freight and four passenger-cars and two locomotives at Cave City, Ky. Morgan supposed the train would contain two hundred and eighty cavalry prisoners, bound northward. The operator at Cave City, however, gave notice of these facts to Bowling Green, and stopped the upward train. Among the captured Nationals wCave City, however, gave notice of these facts to Bowling Green, and stopped the upward train. Among the captured Nationals were Majors Helveti and Coffee, both of Wolford's cavalry, and one other Federal officer and three or four soldiers. The rebels burned all the cars except two, and the locomotive.--Louisville Journal, May 12. The rebel iron-clad steamer Merrimac (Virginia) was blown up by order of her commander at her anchorage off Craney Island, Va.--(Doc. 12.) A letter from Albuquerque, New Mexico, of this date, says: The Texans have continued their retreat to El Paso, and will leave the country ent
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 189.-rebel raid on Glasgow, Ky. (search)
ut that told well that my men were captured. I then retreated five miles on the pike, and sent Lieutenant Chenoweth to Cave City to despatch to General Boyle, and return to where I was, which he did in a surprisingly short time. We left our post all gone. Here I remained gathering up my men and the guns which had been scattered. I shipped a wagon-load of guns to Cave City that evening, and was reenforced about four o'clock. P. M., by Captain Beck, from Munfordville, with twentyfive men, mounted, he having come by Cave City. After giving time to feed his men and rest, we started with sixty men in pursuit of the enemy. Moving out on the Columbia road one mile, we crossed to the Burksville road. This is the road on which the enemy reuld have followed after them, but our horses were rode down--Captain Beck having rode all the way from Munfordville via Cave City that day with his men, and my horses had been in constant use ever since daylight the morning before; so we turned our
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
ell McCook, Ormsby M. Mitchel, George H. Thomas, and Thomas L. Crittenden, acting as major-generals, aided by twenty brigade commanders. These divisions occupied a line across the State, nearly parallel to that held by the Confederates. McCook's, as we have observed, was in the vicinity of Mumfordsville. Brigadier-General William Nelson was about ten miles farther east, with a considerable force, and Mitchel's was held as a reserve to aid McCook in his contemplated attack on Hindman, at Cave City. General Thomas was at Columbia, midway between Bowling Green on the west, and Somerset on the east, and Crittenden was in the extreme eastern part of the State, in the direction of Cumberland Gap. To General Thomas was assigned the duty of attacking the Confederates at Beech Grove and Mill Spring, where, at the middle of January, there were about ten thousand effective men, with nearly twenty pieces of artillery. If successful there, Thomas was to push on over the Cumberland Mountains
May 11, 1862.-affair at Cave City, Ky. Report of H. W. Stager, telegraph operator. Louisville, May 11, 1862. The rebel Col. John Morgan captured a passenger train on Louisville .ad Nashville Railroad at Cave City between 12 and 1 o'clock, taking two officers-Major Coffee, First Kentucky Cavalry, and other name not knoCave City between 12 and 1 o'clock, taking two officers-Major Coffee, First Kentucky Cavalry, and other name not known-and 6 privates prisoners. He burned 45 freight cars and 4 passenger cars and blew up a locomotive. He released all the passengers, and they have returned to Louisville. The train was bound for Nashville. His object was to capture the train from Nashville with rebel prisoners on board; but the train was intercepted and stoppep a locomotive. He released all the passengers, and they have returned to Louisville. The train was bound for Nashville. His object was to capture the train from Nashville with rebel prisoners on board; but the train was intercepted and stopped before reaching Cave City, and returned to Nashville. H. W. Stager. A. Stager.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 229. fight at Munfordsville, Ky. (search)
ll of Company C; making ten killed and twenty-two wounded. A secession account. At dawn on Tuesday morning, Nov. 17th, a body of men consisting in part of Severt's artillery and a fragment of Col. Terry's Rangers was ordered forward from Cave City, near which they were encamped. They proceeded toward Woodsonville, and after they had passed the deep cut on this side of the dirt road bridge, they found a part of the enemy. It was in the out-skirts of Woodsonville. They had learned that adds another page to the glory of our invincible arms. It opens the ball in lower Kentucky. Stirring scenes may be expected hourly in that quarter.--Nashville Banner. Rebel report of the battle. Headquarters advance Guard, C. A., Ky., Cave City, December 19, 1861. sir: At eight o'clock A. M., on the 17th inst., I moved toward Woodsonville for the purpose of breaking up the railroad from the vicinity of that place southward. My force consisted of one thousand one hundred infantry a
be a little injured. All the railroad buildings were destroyed. Some were smoking when we passed. The roads the first day were in splendid order, but much obstructed by trees, which were, however, speedily removed by two companies of mechanics and engineers, who swung their axes with a will, and we were never stopped over fifteen minutes by them. The ponds along the road were filled with dead horses and cattle, as long as any cattle were to be found to fill them. We rested at noon at Cave City, which was very nearly destroyed. On the second day, we started for Bowling Green. The next morning was cold, with about an inch and a half of snow; but we were up betimes and on our way, the Nineteenth Illinois ahead as usual, with her blue flag waving triumphantly. Our road was obstructed, and was filled with signs of the rapid retreat of Hindman's forces. We pushed on vigorously, and made the miles rapidly disappear. Hearing repeatedly that the railroad bridge was destroyed, and
ion, some quartermaster and commissary stores, and one thousand contrabands. Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. Report of Colonel Wilder. Cave City, Ky., Sept. 18, 1862. To J. E. Stacey, A. A.G. and Chief of Staff: sir: I have the honor to report that on September eighth, 1862, according to a special order that day. On Monday, the fifteenth, I assumed command. The enemy had, under the cover of the night, withdrawn from before us — the infantry and artillery to Cave City and the cavalry up the river. Work upon the intrenchments was at once resumed and pushed forward with vigor that day, the night following, and in fact throughou On Tuesday, the sixteenth instant, about half-past 9 A. M. the advance of the enemy attacked our pickets on the south of our works, and from the direction of Cave City. His advance was sternly resisted by companies A, B, and H, Fiftieth Indiana, and part of company K, Seventy-eighth Indiana, under Major Wells, who, as well as
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. Report of Colonel Wilder. Cave City, Ky., Sept. 18, 1862. To J. E. Stacey, A. A.G. and Chief of Staff: sir: I have the honor to report that on September eighth, 1862, according to a special order from General Boyle, I assumed command of the forces at Munfordville, Kentucky. I that day. On Monday, the fifteenth, I assumed command. The enemy had, under the cover of the night, withdrawn from before us — the infantry and artillery to Cave City and the cavalry up the river. Work upon the intrenchments was at once resumed and pushed forward with vigor that day, the night following, and in fact throughou On Tuesday, the sixteenth instant, about half-past 9 A. M. the advance of the enemy attacked our pickets on the south of our works, and from the direction of Cave City. His advance was sternly resisted by companies A, B, and H, Fiftieth Indiana, and part of company K, Seventy-eighth Indiana, under Major Wells, who, as well as
have been doing during the recent eight months, we offer a few notes from our diary; and we think by the time they have read our short history they will say that we have been soldiering in earnest. Our notes may prove very uninteresting, as our opportunities have not been those of a regular correspondent, as we belong to the ranks and know nothing of the movements until we have them to perform, and then we know only what we do and see. September 18, 1863.--Our company was ordered from Cave City back to Munfordville to rejoin the regiment. We remained at Munfordville till the twenty-fourth of September. On the evening of the twenty-fourth we were mounted, and at four o'clock, with three cheers and hundreds of good-byes, we left the camp that had become almost as home, where we lived a cheerful soldier-life the recent ten months. Our stay at Munfordville is the greatest oasis in our soldier-life. There every member of the regiment had often communication with his home, and his d
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