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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
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Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 2 (search)
se propositions do you maintain? I will answer him, that I do not know; but I have received this story, that Diodorus maintained one opinion, the followers of Panthoides, I think, and Cleanthes maintained another opinion, and those of Chrysippus a third. What then is your opinion? I was not made for this purpose, to examine the appearances that occur to me, and to compare what others say and to form an opinion of my own on the thing. Therefore I differ not at all from the grammarian. Who was Hector's father? Priam. Who were his brothers? Alexander and Deiphobus. Who was their mother? Hecuba.—I have heard this story. From whom? From Homer. And Hellanicus also, I think, writes about the same things, and perhaps others like him. And what further have I about the ruling argument? Nothing. But, if I am a vain man, especially at a banquet I surprise the guests by enumerating those who have written on these matters. Both Chrysippus has written wonderfully in his first book about Possibilities
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 12, line 429 (search)
r, with which the wounded me. You see the scar. The old scar still is surely visible! “Those were my days of youth and strength, and then I ought to have warred against the citadel of Pergama. I could have checked, or even vanquished, the arms of Hector: but, alas, Hector had not been born, or was perhaps a boy. Old age has dulled my youthful strength. What use is it, to speak of Periphas, who overcame Pyretus, double-formed? Why tell of Ampyx, who with pointless shaft, victorious thrust EchecluHector had not been born, or was perhaps a boy. Old age has dulled my youthful strength. What use is it, to speak of Periphas, who overcame Pyretus, double-formed? Why tell of Ampyx, who with pointless shaft, victorious thrust Echeclus through the face? Macareus, hurling a heavy crowbar pierced Erigdupus and laid him low. A hunting spear that Nessus strongly hurled, was buried in the groin of Cymelus. Do not believe that Mopsus, son of Ampycus, was merely a prophet of events to come, he slew a daring two-formed monster there. Hodites tried in vain to speak, before his death, but could not, for his tongue was nailed against his chin, his chin against his throat. “Five of the centaurs Caeneus put to death: Styphelus, Bromus, a
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 11, line 749 (search)
he surges glaunce With spindle shanks, (he poynted to the wydegoawld Cormorant) Before that he became a bird, of royall race might vaunt. And if thou covet lineally his pedegree to seeke, His Auncetors were Ilus, and Assaracus, and eeke Fayre Ganymed who Jupiter did ravish as his joy, Laomedon and Priamus the last that reygnd in Troy. Stout Hectors brother was this man. And had he not in pryme Of lusty youth beene tane away, his deedes perchaunce in tyme Had purchaast him as great a name as Hector, though that hee Of Dymants daughter Hecuba had fortune borne to bee. For Aesacus reported is begotten to have beene By scape, in shady Ida on a mayden fayre and sheene Whose name was Alyxothoe, a poore mans daughter that With spade and mattocke for himselfe and his a living gat. This Aesacus the Citie hates, and gorgious Court dooth shonne, And in the unambicious feeldes and woods alone dooth wonne. He seeldoom haunts the towne of Troy, yit having not a rude And blockish wit, nor such a