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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 5: the week of flying fights. (search)
seventeen hundred prisoners. After this defeat, Gordon pushed his retreat to High Bridge, a crossing of the Appomattox five miles below Farmville. Meantime EwellMahone's Divisions following, crossed to the north side of the Appomattox at High Bridge, five miles below Farmville. Our Second Corps closely followed, reaching th Corps had moved from Sailor's Creek at daylight, and at 9.50 had arrived at High Bridge. A singular movement is now put into effect, the purpose of which to ordinaconfronting Longstreet and Gordon on the opposite side of the river, between High Bridge and Farmville, that the Sixth and Twenty-fourth Corps are at hand, and that rps, if he struck quickly, before the Fifth could have got over the river at High Bridge, and the Sixth and Twenty-fourth could have come around from Farmville by th to get across Lee's track. Could our army that morning in easy reach of High Bridge have been rapidly concentrated according to Humphreys's earnest suggestion,
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Battle of Sailor's Creek-engagement at Farmville-correspondence with General Lee-Sheridan Intercepts the enemy. (search)
ement was to get the 6th corps, Wright's, next to the cavalry, with which they had formerly served so harmoniously and so efficiently in the valley of Virginia. The 6th corps now remained with the cavalry and under Sheridan's direct command until after the surrender. Ord had been directed to take possession of all the roads southward between Burkesville and the High Bridge. On the morning of the 6th he sent Colonel Washburn with two infantry regiments with instructions to destroy High Bridge and to return rapidly to Burkesville Station; and he prepared himself to resist the enemy there. Soon after Washburn had started Ord became a little alarmed as to his safety and sent Colonel [Theodore] Read, of his staff, with about eighty cavalrymen, to overtake him and bring him back. Very shortly after this he heard that the head of Lee's column had got up to the road between him and where Washburn now was, and attempted to send reinforcements, but the reinforcements could not get th
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
g June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerulsalem Plank Road June 22-23, 1864. Demonstration north of the James July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkin's House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Crow's House March 31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox C. H. April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. At Burkesville till May 2. March to Washington May 2-13. Grand Review May 23. Duty at Washington till June 30. Mustered out June 30 and discharged July 22, 1865. Regiment lost during service 14 Officers and 147 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 133 Enlisted men by disease. Total 294. 20th Massachusetts Regiment Infantry. Organized at Readville August 29 to September 4, 1
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
es River July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Demonstration north of James at Deep Bottom August 13-20. Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Boydton Road March 30-31. Crow's House March 31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. At Burkesville till May 2. Moved to Washington, D. C., May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June 16-22, thence to Jeffersonville, Ind. Mustered out July 5, 1865. Regiment lost during service 11 Officers and 197 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 186 Enlisted men by disease. Total 397. 8th Michigan Regiment Infantry. Regiment organ
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
-20. Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Poplar Springs Church September 29-October 2. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Reconnoissance to Hatcher's Run December 9-10. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Boydton Road and White Oak Ridge March 29-31. Crow's House March 31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Washington, D. C., May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out at Washington, D. C., June 29, 1865. Regiment lost during service 18 Officers and 138 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 76 Enlisted men by disease. Total 233. 74th New York Regiment Infantry (5th Excelsior Regiment). Organized under authority of the War Department at Camp Scott, State
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Vaughan Road near Hatcher's Run March 29. Crow's House March 31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox C. H. April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. At Burkesville till May 2. March to Washington, D. C., May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. At Ball's Cross Roads till July. Mustered out July 1, 1865her's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House, Petersburg, March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Vaughan Road, near Hatcher's Run, March 29, Crow's House March 31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. At Burkesville May 2. March to Washington May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out June 30, 1865. Regiment lost during service 9 Office
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
stration north of the James at Deep Bottom August 13-20. Strawberry Plains August 14-18. Ream's Station August 25. Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Watkins' House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Hatcher's Run March 29. Boydton Plank Road and White Oak Road March 30-31. Crow's House March 31. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Sailor's Creek April 6. High Bridge and Farmville April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Washington, D. C., May 2-12. Grand Review May 23. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June 17, and there mustered out July 12, 1865. Regiment lost during service 7 Officers and 150 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 182 Enlisted men by disease. Total 342. 37th Wisconsin Regiment Infantry. Organized at Madison, Wis., April 9, 1864. Left State for Washing
of the seventh the pursuit was renewed, the cavalry, except one division, and the Fifth corps moving by Prince Edwards Court-house; the Sixth corps, General Ord's command, and one division of cavalry, on Farmville, and the Second corps by the High Bridge road. It was soon found that the enemy had crossed to the north side of the Appomattox, but so close was the pursuit that the Second corps got possession of the common bridge at High Bridge before the enemy could destroy it, and immediately cHigh Bridge before the enemy could destroy it, and immediately crossed over. The Sixth corps and a division of cavalry crossed at Farmville to its support. Feeling now that General Lee's chance of escape was utterly hopeless, I addressed him the following communication from Farmville: April 7, 1865. General: The result of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 20: Appomattox and after (search)
antagonists. The campaign in the Valley of the Shenandoah had been waged against Early's division of Ewell's corps, and now at the very close of the war the final conflict between them had resulted in the destruction of the corps, so long led by the veteran general of Lee's 3d Army Corps. The result was disastrous also to the Army of Virginia. After the loss of Ewell's corps no other route was left open for the retreat of the Confederate army except to recross the Appomattox River at High Bridge, and make for Lynchburg. This was done and the bridge was burned behind the retreating Confederates. The 6th Corps followed at once but was compelled to wait at Farmville until a new bridge could be thrown across the river. The corps was massed in bivouac just outside the village, and when the bridge was completed it was about midnight, a dark moonless and starless night. When the corps drew out of its bivouac and had fairly entered the village, all the houses of which were closed and
7th, 1864188142499249610 Darbytown Road, October 13th, 1864115416317200 Hatcher's Run and Boydton Road, October 27th and 28th, 101334560854831,284 Fair Oaks, October 27th and 28th, 87426408175701,103 Hatcher's Run, February 5th, 6th, and 7th, 1865610724512477730 Din widdie Court-house, March 30th, 186512238 Five Forks, April 1st, 1865492252676394 Amelia Springs and Court-house, April 5th, 18651421623 Sailors' Creek and Rice's Station, April 6th, 1865101343446117647 Farmville and High Bridge, April 7th, 1865751201059192 Appomattox Court-house, April 9th, 1865142744641?8 Siege and Assaults on Petersburg from June 16th, 1864, to April 2nd, 18651403,07955011,7941213,75119,435 Cavalry Corps, from May 9th, 1864, to April 8th, 18652527070763591,6222,809 This embraces the casualties in various minor engagements, actions, &c., in connection with the operations of the army during the campaigns of 1864 and 1865, such as Black water, Jarrott's Station, Nottaway Bridge, Piney Bra
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