hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Daily Dispatch: September 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 16 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
William A. Crafts, Life of Ulysses S. Grant: His Boyhood, Campaigns, and Services, Military and Civil. 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 1,556 results in 374 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, General Halleck in command-commanding the district of Cairo-movement on Fort Henry- capture of Fort Henry (search)
n command. I followed with one of the later boats and found McClernand had stopped, very properly, nine miles below Fort Henry. Seven gunboats under Flag-officer Foote had accompanied the advance. The transports we had with us had to return to Paducah to bring up a division from there, with General C. F. Smith in command. Before sending the boats back I wanted to get the troops as near to the enemy as I could without coming within range of their guns. There was a stream emptying [sic] in deck near the stern, penetrated and passed through the cabin and so out into the river. We immediately turned back, and the troops were debarked below the mouth of the creek. When the landing was completed I returned with the transports to Paducah to hasten up the balance of the troops. I got back on the 5th with the advance, the remainder following as rapidly as the steamers could carry them. At ten o'clock at night, on the 5th, the whole command was not yet up. Being anxious to commen
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Promoted Major-General of Volunteers-Unoccupied territory-advance upon Nashville-situation of the troops-confederate retreat- relieved of the command-restored to the command-general Smith (search)
been sent for that purpose, reached me after Donelson was invested. I received nothing direct which indicated that the department commander knew we were in possession of Donelson. I was reporting regularly to the chief of staff, who had been sent to Cairo, soon after the troops left there, to receive all reports from the front and to telegraph the substance to the St. Louis headquarters. Cairo was at the southern end of the telegraph wire. Another line was started at once from Cairo to Paducah and Smithland, at the mouths of the Tennessee and Cumberland respectively. My dispatches were all sent to Cairo by boat, but many of those addressed to me were sent to the operator at the end of the advancing wire and he failed to forward them. This operator afterwards proved to be a rebel; he deserted his post after a short time and went south taking his dispatches with him. A telegram from General McClellan to me of February 16th, the day of the surrender, directing me to report in full
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The military situation-plans for the campaign-sheridan assigned to command of the cavalry-flank movements-forrest at Fort Pillow-General Banks's expedition-colonel Mosby-an incident of the Wilderness campaign (search)
lan was abandoned when the limited quantity of supplies possible to take with us was considered. The country over which we would have to pass was so exhausted of all food or forage that we would be obliged to carry everything with us. While these preparations were going on the enemy was not entirely idle. In the West Forrest made a raid in West Tennessee up to the northern border, capturing the garrison of four or five hundred men at Union City, and followed it up by an attack on Paducah, Kentucky, on the banks of the Ohio. While he was able to enter the city he failed to capture the forts or any part of the garrison. On the first intelligence of Forrest's raid I telegraphed Sherman to send all his cavalry against him, and not to let him get out of the trap he had put himself into. Sherman had anticipated me by sending troops against him before he got my order. Forrest, however, fell back rapidly, and attacked the troops at Fort Pillow, a station for the protection of the
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, VI. September, 1861 (search)
. He whispered me to-day, as he beheld Major Tyler doing the honors of his office, that I might just hint at the possibility of his resumption soon of the functions of chief of the bureau. But he said he wanted a few days holiday. September 12 Gen. Pillow has advanced, and occupied Columbus, Ky. He was ordered, by telegraph, to abandon the town and return to his former position. Then the order was countermanded, and he remains. The authorities have learned that the enemy occupies Paducah. September 13 The Secretary, after writing and tendering his resignation, appointed my young friend Jaques a special clerk with $2000 salary. This was allowed by a recent act. September 14 Some of Mr. Walker's clerks must know that he intends giving up the seals of office soon, for they are engaged day and night, and all night, copying the entire letter-book, which is itself but a copy of the letters I and others have written, with Mr. Walker's name appended to them. Long may
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 38 (search)
from a conference with Gen. Butler, at Fortress Monroe, and it is announced that arrangements have been made for an immediate resumption of the exchange of prisoners on the old footing. Thus has the government abandoned the ground so proudly assumed — of non-intercourse with Butler, and the press is firing away at it for negotiating with the Beast and outlaw. But our men in captivity are in favor of a speedy exchange, no matter with whom the agreement is made. Forrest has destroyed Paducah, Ky. There is a little quarrel in progress between the Secretaries of War and the Treasury. Some days ago the Postmaster-General got from the President an order that his clerks should be detailed for the use of the department until further orders. The Secretary of the Treasury made an application to the Secretary of War for a similar detail, but it was refused. Mr. Memminger appealed, with some acerbity, to the President, and the President indorsed on the paper that the proper rule woul
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Chapter 11: Kentucky. (search)
in the Confederate service. On September 5th he began moving his forces northward, violating the neutrality of Kentucky by occupying the town of Hickman, on the Mississippi, within that State. The movement did not pass unobserved; the Union commander at Cairo had, with equal vigilance, been studying the possibilities of the river system in his neighborhood. On the following day, Brigadier-General Grant proceeded, with two gunboats and an infantry force, to take possession of the town of Paducah, at the confluence of the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers with the Ohio — a movement which bore important fruit a few months later. General Polk, on his part still marching northward, reached and occupied Columbus, on the Mississippi, on September 7th. Having hastily procured the endorsement of this step from Jefferson Davis, General Polk, on the 9th, formally notified Governor Magoffin of his presence in Kentucky. By this time also, the Unionists of the State had completed and compa
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Index. (search)
by secessionists, 16; S. Carolina Commissioners treat for delivery of, 27 Nelson, Lieut., William, U. S. N., 131 et seq. New York City, proposition for secession of, 71; war meeting in, 92 New York Seventh Regiment, 103 Norfolk Navy Yard, 83; destroyed, 96 North Carolina, attitude of, with regard to secession, 1, 80 North, its misapprehension of Southern opinion, 71 et seq. O. Ohio levies, 128 Ohio, Military Department of the, 140 Ohio River, 127 P. Paducah, 134 Palmetto flag, 32 Parkersburg, 142 Patterson, General, Robert, 155; map of his campaign, 159; indecision of, 161; Scott's orders to, 163 et seq. Pawnee, the, 110 Pegram, Colonel, 147 Peirpont, F. H., Governor, 145 Pensacola, 38, 79 Pennsylvania, Military Department of, 155 Philippi, 143 et seq.; battle of, 144, 146 et seq. Phillips, Wendell, 76 Pickens, Fort, at Pensacola, 16, 38, 51, 53 Pickens, Franois W., Governor of South Carolina, 5, 32; dem
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
. J. Smith's expeditions will appear in Vol. XXXIX. During the months of March and April this same force under Forrest annoyed us considerably. On the 24th of March it captured Union City, Ky., and its garrison, and on the 24th [25th] attacked Paducah, commanded by Col. S. G. Hicks, Fortieth Illinois Volunteers. Colonel Hicks having but a small force, withdrew to the forts near the river, from where he repulsed the enemy and drove him from the place. On the 13th of April part of this force, ck in the afternoon, when the enemy carried the works by assault, and, after our men threw down their arms, proceeded to an inhuman and merciless massacre — of the garrison. On the 14th General Buford, having failed at Columbus, appeared before Paducah, but was again driven off. For subordinate reports of Forrest's expedition into West Tennessee and Kentucky, see Vol. XXXII, Part I, p. 501. Guerrillas and raiders, seemingly emboldened by Forrest's operations, were also very active in Ken
Montgomery men, irrespective of party, who are loyal to the Government by a vigorous prosecution of this war, and who in no contingency are in favor of secession. --N. Y. Evening Post, August 22. The steamer Samuel Orr, an Evansville and Paducah mail packet, was seized at Paducah, Ky., and taken up the Tennessee River. The officers and crew left her, and went to Cairo, Ill., in skiffs. Her cargo was valued at twenty thousand dollars.--Baltimore American, August 24. In PhiladelphiPaducah, Ky., and taken up the Tennessee River. The officers and crew left her, and went to Cairo, Ill., in skiffs. Her cargo was valued at twenty thousand dollars.--Baltimore American, August 24. In Philadelphia, Pa., the U. S. marshal, Milward, proceeded to the office of the Christian Observer, in Fourth street below Chestnut, and took all the type, paper, and other appurtenances of the place. He also closed up the office, and warned the persons conducting the Observer that, on any attempt to revive the publication, they would be dealt with according to law. The indignation of the people against this sheet was rapidly culminating down to the time of its stoppage, and it was to have been torn out on
one's Headquarters, and a section of a battery was soon provided. The rebels discharged two shells without effect, which were responded to with spherical-case shot, causing a splendid specimen of racing by the rebels. The distance between the two batteries was not less than three-quarters of a mile.--National Intelligencer, Sept. 12. This morning at eleven o'clock, General Grant, with two regiments of infantry, one company of light artillery, and two gunboats, took possession of Paducah, Kentucky. He found secession flags flying in different parts of the city, in expectation of greeting the arrival of the Southern army, which was reported three thousand eight hundred strong, sixteen miles distant. The loyal citizens tore down the secession flags on the arrival of the national troops. General Grant took possession of the telegraph office, railroad depot, and the marine hospital, and issued the following proclamation: I have come among you not as an enemy, but as your
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...