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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. (search)
Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. And now neral Grant had moved from Cairo and occupied Paducah in force on the 6th. Many of the rebel familreas I, the centre, had from the Big Sandy to Paducah, over three hundred miles of frontier; that Mingfield, Missouri. General Grant was then at Paducah, and General Curtis was under orders for Rollthe district, was collecting a large force at Paducah, Cairo, and Bird's Point. General Halleck hadracks: You will immediately repair to Paducah, Kentucky, and assume command of that post. BrigaW. Halleok, Major-General. I started for Paducah the same day, and think that General Cullum wnessee River with unusual vigor. On reaching Paducah, I found this dispatch: headquarters Deary 15, 1862. Brigadier-General Sherman, Paducah, Kentucky: Send General Grant every thing you can spare from Paducah and Smith land; also General Hurlbut. Bowling Green has been evacuated ent
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 9: battle of Shiloh. March and April, 1862. (search)
ed his chief of staff, General Cullum, at Cairo, and me at Paducah, chiefly to expedite and facilitate tile important operatitting away from him, and began to send dispatches to me at Paducah, to be forwarded by boat, or by a rickety telegraph-line u the Tennessee River; transports will also be collected at Paducah. Two gunboats in Tennessee River with Grant. General Graat General Halleck should have been patient. Meantime, at Paducah, I was busy sending boats in every direction — some under was organizing out of the new troops that were arriving at Paducah a division for myself when allowed to take the field, whicary orders from General Halleck, I embarked my division at Paducah. It was composed of four brigades. The First, commanded ck, except chronic cases, which can always be sent down to Paducah. Magnificent plain for camping and drilling, and a milily all having received their muskets for the first time at Paducah. None of them had ever been under fire or beheld heavy co
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 16 (search)
nessee, I went to Cincinnati and Lancaster, Ohio, to spend Christmas with my family; and on my return I took Minnie with me down to a convent at Reading, near Cincinnati, where I left her, and took the cars for Cairo, Illinois, which I reached January 3d, a very cold and bitter day. The ice was forming fast, and there was great danger that the Mississippi River would become closed to navigation. Admiral Porter, who was at Cairo, gave me a small gunboat (the Juliet), with which I went up to Paducah, to inspect that place, garrisoned by a small force, commanded by Colonel S. G. Hicks, Fortieth Illinois, who had been with me and was severely wounded at Shiloh. Returning to Cairo, we started down the Mississippi River, which was full of floating ice. With the utmost difficulty we made our way through it, for hours floating in the midst of immense cakes, that chafed and ground our boat so that at times we were in danger of sinking. But about the 10th of January we reached Memphis, where
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 17 (search)
railroad company to the cause of his country. About this time, viz., the early part of April, I was much disturbed by a bold raid made by the rebel General Forrest up between the Mississippi and Tennessee Rivers. He reached the Ohio River at Paducah, but was handsomely repulsed by Colonel Hicks. He then swung down toward Memphis, assaulted and carried Fort Pillow, massacring a part of its garrison, composed wholly of negro troops. At first I discredited the story of the massacre, because, he should not find you in person, I will simply state that Forrest, availing himself of the absence of our furloughed men and of the detachment with you, has pushed up between the Mississippi and Tennessee Rivers, even to the Ohio. He attacked Paducah, but got the worst of it, and he still lingers about the place. I hope that he will remain thereabouts till General A. J. Smith can reach his destined point, but this I can hardly expect; yet I want him to reach by the Yazoo a position near Gre
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
ed for the campaign were ordered to march for Atlanta, and General Corse, before evacuating his post at Rome, was ordered to burn all the mills, factories, etc., etc., that could be useful to the enemy, should he undertake to pursue us, or resume military possession of the country. This was done on the night of the 10th, and next day Corse reached Kingston. On the 11th General Thomas and I interchanged full dispatches. He had heard of the arrival of General A. J. Smith's two divisions at Paducah, which would surely reach Nashville much sooner than General Hood could possibly do from Florence, so that he was perfectly satisfied with his share of the army. On the 12th, with a full staff, I started from Kingston for Atlanta; and about noon of that day we reached Cartersville, and sat on the edge of a porch to rest, when the telegraph operator, Mr. Van Valkenburg, or Eddy, got the wire down from the poles to his lap, in which he held a small pocket instrument. Calling Chattanooga,