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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
itself on the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States. He then proceeded with his speech, in terms of fervid eloquence. I am reminded, he said, by the transactions in which we are now engaged, of an incident in French history. It was late in the night, at Versailles, that a courtier of Louis XVI., penetrating the bedcham-ber of his master, and arousing him from his slumbers, communicated to him the intelligence—big with gigantic destinies—that the people of Paris, smarting under wrong and falsehood, had risen in their might, and, after a severe contest with hireling troops, destroyed the Bastile. The unhappy monarch, turning upon his couch, said, It is an insurrection. No, Sire, was the reply of the honest courtier, it is a revolution. And such is our Movement to-day. It is a Revolution—not beginning with the destruction of a Bastile, but destined to end only with the overthrow of a tyranny, differing little in hardship and audacity from that wh<
itself on the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States. He then proceeded with his speech, in terms of fervid eloquence. I am reminded, he said, by the transactions in which we are now engaged, of an incident in French history. It was late in the night, at Versailles, that a courtier of Louis XVI., penetrating the bedcham-ber of his master, and arousing him from his slumbers, communicated to him the intelligence—big with gigantic destinies—that the people of Paris, smarting under wrong and falsehood, had risen in their might, and, after a severe contest with hireling troops, destroyed the Bastile. The unhappy monarch, turning upon his couch, said, It is an insurrection. No, Sire, was the reply of the honest courtier, it is a revolution. And such is our Movement to-day. It is a Revolution—not beginning with the destruction of a Bastile, but destined to end only with the overthrow of a tyranny, differing little in hardship and audacity from that wh<
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
earth to-day, as he was before the Caesars. No new dispensation has been granted to nations. It is graven among the pandects of eternity that the nation that will not serve me shall perish. Heaven's code never changes. The decisions of that Court of final Appeals are never reversed. Charles I. of England did not understand this philosophy. His ignorance cost him his head from the window of Palace Hall. Louis XVI. did not understand it; and his head rolled from the guillotine in Paris. So have a whole regal mob of the oppressors of mankind, sooner or later, from Tarquin to Louis, been sent to their doom by the swift judgment of Heaven. Modern nations have followed the same road as ancient empires wherever they have violated the great laws of civic prosperity and endurance. They have gone to ruin over the same beaten track where the dead dynasties of the past had left their bones. No statesman will pretend, be he saint or sinner, that a man or a nation can conten
earth to-day, as he was before the Caesars. No new dispensation has been granted to nations. It is graven among the pandects of eternity that the nation that will not serve me shall perish. Heaven's code never changes. The decisions of that Court of final Appeals are never reversed. Charles I. of England did not understand this philosophy. His ignorance cost him his head from the window of Palace Hall. Louis XVI. did not understand it; and his head rolled from the guillotine in Paris. So have a whole regal mob of the oppressors of mankind, sooner or later, from Tarquin to Louis, been sent to their doom by the swift judgment of Heaven. Modern nations have followed the same road as ancient empires wherever they have violated the great laws of civic prosperity and endurance. They have gone to ruin over the same beaten track where the dead dynasties of the past had left their bones. No statesman will pretend, be he saint or sinner, that a man or a nation can conten
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Ninth: Emancipation of the African race. (search)
chief mourner; and his ovation was a funeral at Buffalo. So, too, with his successor, who left the new-made grave of his only son in Concord, killed in an instant, to be inaugurated at the Capitol, and enter as a mourner, this stately mansion Yes, gentlemen, said Edward, the chief door-keeper, it is all still in the house now. We entered the Green Room; Willie lay in his coffin. The lid was off. He was clothed in his soldier's dress. He had been embalmed by the process of Susquet, of Paris, and thus Willie Wallace Lincoln's body was prepared for its final resting-place in the home of his happy childhood. One more look at the calm face, which still wore its wonted expression of hope and cheerfulness, and we left him to his repose. In the meantime, a measured footfall had come faintly from the East Room, and the tall form of the chief mourner was passing into the sacred place. Is it all well?—All my thanks. Leaving the stricken President in the solemn silence of the deep n
chief mourner; and his ovation was a funeral at Buffalo. So, too, with his successor, who left the new-made grave of his only son in Concord, killed in an instant, to be inaugurated at the Capitol, and enter as a mourner, this stately mansion Yes, gentlemen, said Edward, the chief door-keeper, it is all still in the house now. We entered the Green Room; Willie lay in his coffin. The lid was off. He was clothed in his soldier's dress. He had been embalmed by the process of Susquet, of Paris, and thus Willie Wallace Lincoln's body was prepared for its final resting-place in the home of his happy childhood. One more look at the calm face, which still wore its wonted expression of hope and cheerfulness, and we left him to his repose. In the meantime, a measured footfall had come faintly from the East Room, and the tall form of the chief mourner was passing into the sacred place. Is it all well?—All my thanks. Leaving the stricken President in the solemn silence of the deep n