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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 65 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 20 4 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 17 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 10, 1862., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
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lve months unarmed men against the steady refusal of the department, he would not be surprised at any effort to repress promptly such disingenuous practices. General Johnston's letter, however, evoked no reply as to the other matters involved. The secretary had probably said in a former letter, of December 22d, all that he had to say on the subject. These are his words: Zollicoffer reports himself in almost undisputed possession of the banks of the Cumberland, from the forks near Somerset, all the way down to the Tennessee line, and seems able to guard your right flank, so that your front alone appears to be seriously threatened, and I had hoped you had sufficient force in your intrenched lines to defy almost any front attack. I have not, unfortunately, another musket to send you. We have an immensely valuable cargo of arms and powder in Nassau, blockaded there by a Yankee gunboat, that I am trying to get out. But, if we succeed, it will be too late for your present need
Louisville, and have thrown forward a strong advance to Woodsonville, with which Terry's cavalry had a successful rencounter on the 17th instant, in which we had the misfortune to lose the gallant leader of it. These forces, in heavy masses, are stationed at Woodsonville, Bacon Creek, Nolin, etc. There is also a corps of about 6,000 men at Columbia, which is being rapidly reinforced. There is another considerable force at Lebanon, at the terminus of the Louisville Railroad, and another at Somerset. The banks of Green River from Munfordsville down are unoccupied, as the country is quite rugged, except by a force under General T. L. Crittenden. These dispositions of their troops are in accordance with information received from various sources, and lead to the belief that a forward movement will very soon be made in this direction; but, at present, I can only conjecture whether they will make their attack here, or turn my right, or, relying upon their superiority of numbers, attemp
cribes this point as commanding the converging roads from Somerset and Columbia, as in a fertile and well-stocked country, wost essential route to be guarded is that leading through Somerset and Monticello, as, in my opinion, most practicable for tsed Fishing Creek and reconnoitred the Federal camps near Somerset. On the 8th, at Fishing Creek, the cavalry was fired on erawed and put upon his guard, retired three miles behind Somerset, intrenched himself in a strong position, and called louder's letters correctly estimate the force of the enemy at Somerset at seven infantry regiments and some cavalry, which agreeill allow. . . . I will endeavor to prevent the forces at Somerset and Columbia from uniting. The proximity of the terminusor above. Mill Springs, and lies between our position and Somerset. It is more than thirty miles long, runs in a deep ravinistant from that on the west. There are two crossings to Somerset, seven and eleven miles from here. Crittenden's weekl
, and possibly cross the Tennessee! We were not long left in suspense. Buell dared not attack us in front, but waited for Grant to ascend the Cumberland in our rear. Our right flank was threatened also by a large Federal force under Thomas at Somerset, which was advancing against Crittenden's small force at Beech Grove. Zollicoffer, being but second in command to Crittenden at Beech Grove, had but little influence in the management. Our troops had been almost in a starving condition for some time, and had but scant rations for several months. Crittenden was fully informed of the Federal advance at Columbia and Somerset, but did little to prepare for the attack. In fact, it is said that he was incapable of commanding, from social failings, and did not heed the many warnings of friends, who foresaw that the enemy were bent on surrounding him. On learning that Thomas was at Mill Spring, Crittenden set out to meet Rim, thinking it possible to drive him from his fortified camps.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Holding Kentucky for the Union. (search)
he revocation of the order Carter returned to London, while Schoepf took position soon after at Somerset. in September Colonel John S. Williams had begun to gather a Confederate force at Prestonbucut off by the marching columns. At the same time an expedition from Lebanon, moving by way of Somerset, was to be directed against East Tennessee. Until he was ready to move, he desired to do nothi garrison, had made his appearance on the Cumberland at Mill Springs, a few miles south-west of Somerset, had crossed the river, and after some picket-firing with Schoepf had intrenched himself on theon the north side of the Cumberland, opposite Mill Springs) and about the same distance west of Somerset, with the 9th Ohio and 2d Minnesota of Robert L. McCook's brigade, the 10th Indiana of Manson'swo East Tennessee regiments, and Wetmore's battery still farther to the left, in front. of the Somerset road. Standard's battery and Kenny's remaining Brig.-Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer, C. S. A. Fro
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 9: General view of the campaigns of 1862. (search)
tes may be expected to make their most successful resistance, and the Federalists to find their accidental advantages lost, and their true obstacles beginning. The true strategic difficulties of the Confederates, have ever arisen more from their enemies' command of the water, than from their superior numbers. A review of the crowd of disasters with which the year 1862 opened, will be the best illustration of these reasonings. The first of these was the battle of Mill Spring, or of Somerset, in the southeastern part of Kentucky; where the Confederates, at first victorious, were struck with discouragement by the death of their beloved commander Gen. Zollicoffer, and suffered a defeat. This insulated event was without consequence, save as it showed improved spirit and drill in the Federal soldiery. February 8th, a Federal fleet and army, entering Albemarle Sound in North Carolina, overpowered the feeble armament on land and water, by which the Confederates sought to defend Roa
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, July, 1863. (search)
he afterwards explained to me meant digging fortifications. We arrived at Cumberland at 7 P. M. This is a great coal place, and a few weeks ago it was touched up by Imboden, who burnt a lot of coal barges, which has rendered the people rabid against the Rebs. I started by stage for Johnstown at 8.30 P. M. 11th July, 1863 (Saturday). I hope I may never for my sins be again condemned to travel for thirty hours in an American stage on a used — up plank-road. We changed carriages at Somerset. All my fellowtrav-ellers were of course violent Unionists, and invariably spoke of my late friends as Rebels or Rebs. They had all got into their heads that their Potomac army, not having been thoroughly thrashed, as it always has been hitherto, had achieved a tremendous victory; and that its new chief, General Meade, who in reality was driven into a strong position, which he had sense enough to stick to, is a wonderful strategist. They all hope that the remnants of Lee's army will not
saved were swallowed up in bankruptcy, caused by the failure of the Sciota and Hocking Valley Railroad Company, for which he was fulfilling a contract at the time, and this disaster left him finally only a small farm, just outside the village of Somerset, where he dwelt until his death in 1875. My father's occupation kept him away from home much of the time during my boyhood, and as a consequence I grew up under the sole guidance and training of my mother, whose excellent common sense and cl United States Army. At once I set about preparing for the examination which precedes admission to the Military Academy, studying zealously under the direction of Mr. William Clark; my old teachers, McNanly and Thorn, having disappeared from Somerset and sought new fields of usefulness. The intervening months passed rapidly away, and I fear that I did not make much progress, yet I thought I should be able to pass the preliminary examination. That which was to follow worried me more and gav
that it thrilled all who witnessed the scene; and until the close of the war, when peace separated the surviving officers and men of the battery, that little flag was protected and cherished as a memento of the Perryville campaign. Pursuit of the enemy was not continued in force beyond Crab Orchard, but some portions of the army kept at Bragg's heels until he crossed the Cumberland River, a part of his troops retiring to Tennessee by way of Cumberland Gap, but the major portion through Somerset. As the retreat of Bragg transferred the theatre of operations back to Tennessee, orders were now issued for a concentration of Buell's army at Bowling Green, with a view to marching it to Nashville, and my division moved to that point without noteworthy incident. I reached Bowling Green with a force much reduced by the losses sustained in the battle of Perryville and by sickness. I had started from Louisville on October 1 with twelve regiments of infantry-four old and eight new ones-an
hio, Colonel Vandeveer, made a silent, cautious march to the Salt Works on Fishing Creek, Ky, with the full expectation of capturing a regiment of secesh cavalry, who were guarding the works while some of their men were manufacturing salt. But when they arrived there the workmen and cavalry had gone to their camp. So they made a charge on the Salt Works, breaking the kettles, disabling the pumps, and spreading havoc among the utensils generally; after which they marched back to camp, near Somerset.--Louisville Journal, Jan. 4, 1862. Early this morning two squadrons of Col. Jackson's regiment, under command of Major Murray, left the camp near Calhoun, on a scouting expedition across Green River, Ky. When they arrived at South Carrollton, the squadrons separated, and the first returned toward Calhoun by way of Sacramento, at which place they were surprised by seven hundred rebels, under command of Colonel Forrest. The troops were fired upon by the rebels before they were aware of
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