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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 65 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 20 4 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 10, 1862., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) or search for Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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d rendered his navigation of the river below him precarious, if not entirely obstructed it. On his right front, Gen. Schoepf, with a force of 8,000 men, occupied Somerset; but was content to occupy it, without attempting or desiring to make trouble. But Gen. George H. Thomas, having been ordered Dec. 29, 1861. by Gen. Buell to our forces in that part of Kentucky, resolved to anticipate it; A Rebel letter to the Louisville (Nashville) Courier, says: The enemy in front occupied Somerset with several regiments, and Columbia with an equal force. On the 17th and 18th, it rained so much that Fishing creek could not be crossed; and so the Somerset fantry, six cannon, and two battalions of cavalry, to strike and surprise the three or four Union regiments which he was assured were alone posted between him and Somerset. He struck them as he had expected, but did not surprise them; Gen. Thomas having taken the precaution to send out strong pickets of infantry on the roads leadi
rough Aug. 22. across the Cumberland range, through Big Creek Gap, moving as rapidly as possible, with a very light train ; his men subsisting mainly on green corn — which is scarce enough in that poor, thinly-peopled region — his hungry, foot-sore, dusty followers buoyed up with the assurance of plenty and comfort ahead. His cavalry advance, 900 strong, under Col. J. S. Scott, moving Aug. 13. from Kingston, Tenn., passed through Montgomery and Jamestown, Tenn., and Monticello and Somerset, Ky., to London, where it surprised Aug. 17. and routed a battalion of Union cavalry, inflicting a loss of 30 killed and wounded and 111 prisoners; thence pushing on, making additional captures by the way, to Richmond, Ky.; thence falling back to rejoin Smith, who had not yet come up. The Cumberland Mountains are a broad range of table-land, some 2,000 feet in average height, descending sharply to the upper waters of the Tennessee and Cumberland on either hand, and pierced by a single c
nville, across Dick's river and the Kentucky; abandoning the heart of the State to rapine. Pegram lacked the audacity to continue the pursuit, as well as the force to justify it, or he might, perhaps, have chased Carter and Wolford across the Ohio. But the Rebels turned here to fly, March 27. thus revealing their weakness; and soon found a dangerous force on their hells. They were sharply chased by Wolford's cavalry through Lancaster, Stanford, and Waynesburg, to within three miles of Somerset, where they were brought to bay: March 30. meanwhile, Gen. Q. A. gillmore had joined the pursuit with 250 of the 7th Ohio cavalry and taken command: swelling the Union force to about 1,200 men. The Rebels are stated, in the reports on our side, to have been twice that number — a statement which is not confirmed by any returns, and is probably a gross exaggeration, explained by the efforts of the enemy to diffuse an extravagant idea of their numbers. At all events, they were very easily
and 8 guns from Vaughan at Wytheville, Va., 688. Gillmore, Gen. Quincy A., routs Pegram near Somerset, 427; his plan for bombarding Fort Pulaski adopted, 456; 457; fall of Fort Pulaski due to, 458;le, Tenn., 409. Shenandoah, Va., 605. Shepherdstown, Md., 393. Solemn Grove, N. C., 705. Somerset, Ky., 427. Somerville, Tenn., 616. South Mills, N. C., 80 Spring Hill, Tenn., 284. Springfieln. John J., repels Longstreet at Suffolk, Va., 367. Pegram, Gen., routed by Gillmore near Somerset, Ky., 427; wounded at the Wilderness, 568; killed at Dabney's Mill, Va., 726. Pelouze, Major, Snicker's Gap, occupied by Lee's army, 212. soldiers' vote, 224; for President, 672. Somerset, Ky., Gillmore routs Pegram, 427. Soule, Hon. Pierre, 98; banished, 100. South Mountain, Mdkilled at Richmond, Ky., 215. Wolford, Gen. Frank T., opposes Morgan, 404; pursues Pegram to Somerset, 427; repels Scott's cavalry, 428; is routed at Philadelphia, Tenn., 431. Wood, Gen. T. J.,