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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 3 3 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
e second night in a position which pointed to either flank. The other two corps moved respectively through Shepherdsville and Mt. Washington, to converge upon Bardstown, and halted the second night at Salt River. The enemy's pickets were encountered on all of the roads within a few miles of the city, increasing in strength as the movement progressed, and opposing a sharp opposition at Bardstown and Shelbyville. Polk withdrew his army from Bardstown on the night of the 3d, going through Springfield, and Sill, against a considerable resistance, pushed back the force in front of him toward Frankfort. These measures brought to a hurried completion the inauguration of Provisional Governor Hawes at Frankfort on the 4th, under the supervision of General Bragg. Polk, on his part, was pressed so closely that Hardee, who was bringing up his rear, was compelled to make a stand at Perryville and call for assistance. Assuming that Smith was the object of my attack, and that my right and rear
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 1.5 (search)
On the field of Perryville. condensed from General Gilbert's articles in the Southern bivouac, and revised by him.--editors. by Charles C. Gilbert, Major-General, U. S. V. As the Army of the Ohio, moving from Bardstown, approached Perryville on the 7th of October, 1862, McCook's corps formed the left, Crittenden's the right, and mine — which was moving on the direct road by the way of Springfield, and was ahead of the others — the center. [See maps, pp. 6 and 24.] In my column, R. B. MitchelPs division had the lead; Schoepf followed, and Sheridan brought up the rear. Our advance was vigorously resisted by Wheeler's cavalry, forming the rear-guard of Hardee's corps, which was retiring before us. About 2 o'clock in the afternoon, when the head of the column was nearing the line of Doctor's Creek, a tributary of the Chaplin River, or more properly the Chaplin Fork of Salt River, the enemy, in force, was observed lining the crest of the ridge on the farther bank, obviously with
st Cumberland Gap-If not, it will be needed in Tennessee. There is one regiment at Somer. set. I leave it there at present with the same view. One regiment on the Lexington and Covington Railroad, which passes through a troublesome neighborhood and is important for supplying the Cumberland Gap column. It will be necessary to keep the regiment on that duty for the present. Three regiments of infantry on the railroad from here to Louisville. I have ordered a regiment of cavalry to Springfield, Ky., with detachments from it on the railroads at and this side of Bowling Green. The cavalry not accounted for in the above will be employed on the lines of communication of the army this side of the Cumberland. The artillery also unaccounted for is here in reserve and ready to move forward. The whole force this side of the Cumberland will amount to about 55,000 men, of which one brigade of infantry, two batteries, and a regiment of cavalry I shall leave here for the present. At leas
ng has occurred daily with the enemy's cavalry since then, and it was supposed the enemy would give battle at Bardstown. By troops reached that point on the fourth, driving the enemy's rear guard of cavalry and artillery of the main body to Springfield, whither pursuit was continued. The centre corps, under General Gilbert, moved in the direct road from Springfield to Perrysville, and arrived on the seventh one mile from town, where the enemy was found to be in force. The left column, undeSpringfield to Perrysville, and arrived on the seventh one mile from town, where the enemy was found to be in force. The left column, under Gen. McCook, came upon the Maxville road about ten o'clock yesterday, (the eighth.) It was ordered into position to attack, and a strong reconnoissance directed. At four o'clock I received a request from Gen. McCook for reenforcements, and learned that the left had been seriously engaged for several hours, and that the right and left of that corps were being turned and severely pressed. Reenforcements were immediately sent forward from the centre. Orders were also sent to the right colum
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Kentucky, 1862 (search)
h, MadisonvilleINDIANA--4th Cavalry. Oct. 5: Skirmish, GlasgowKENTUCKY--20th Infantry. Oct. 6: Skirmish, Black Fork(No Reports.) Oct. 6: Skirmish, Burnt Cross Roads(No Reports.) Oct. 6: Skirmish, Fair Ground(No Reports.) Oct. 6: Skirmish, Springfield(No Reports.) Oct. 7: Skirmish, Brown Hill(No Reports.) Oct. 7: Action, Doctor's ForkPENNSYLVANIA--9th Cavalry. Oct. 8: Battle of PerryvilleILLINOIS--Battery "I" 2d Light Arty.; 21st, 24th, 25th, 35th, 36th, 38th, 44th, 59th, 73d, 74th, 75th Dec. 29: Action, Johnson's Ferry or Hamilton's Ford, Rolling ForkOHIO--Battery "C" 1st Light Arty. Dec. 29: Skirmish, BostonINDIANA--10th and 74th Infantry. KENTUCKY--12th Cavalry; 4th and 13th Infantry. OHIO--Battery "C" 1st Light Arty.; 14th Infy. Dec. 30: Skirmish, New HavenILLINOIS--78th Infantry (Co. "H"). Dec. 30: Skirmish, Rolling ForkINDIANA--10th Infantry. Dec. 30: Affair, SpringfieldKENTUCKY--6th and 9th Cavalry (Detachments). Dec. 31: Action, Muldraugh's Hill near New Market 
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
Ohio, to November, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 5th Division (Centre), 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 5th Division, 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 14th Army Corps, to October, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps, to June, 1865. 1st Brigade,3rd Division, 14th Army Corps,to June, 1865. Service. Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-15, 1862. Escort Division trains to Springfield, Ky. March to Munfordsville, Ky., October 12, and duty there till November 30. Expedition to Cavalrye City October 31-November 26. Moved to Bledsoe Creek November 30. Pursuit of Morgan December 22, 1862, to January 2, 1863. March to Nashville, Tenn., thence to Murfreesboro, Tenn., January 3-11, and duty there till June. Expedition to Auburn, Liberty and Alexandria February 3-5. Reconnoissance to Woodbury March 3-8. Action at Vaught's Hill, near Milton, March 20. Ex
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
alk, Chesser's Store, October 9. Capture of Harrodsburg October 11. Moved to Cumberland River and operating against Champ Ferguson till December. Operations against Morgan's Raid in Kentucky December 22, 1862, to January 2, 1863. Springfield, Ky., December 30 (Detachment). Operations against Pegram March 22-April 1. Danville March 22 and 28. Expedition to Monticello and operations in Southeastern Kentucky April 26-May 12. Cumberland River May 9. Pursuit of Morgan July rchard, and Big Rockcastle River, near Mount Vernon, October 18. Pittman's Cross Roads October 19. March to Nashville, Tenn., October 23-November 6, and duty there till December 26. Advance on Murfreesboro, Tenn., December 26-30. Springfield, Ky., December 30 (Detachment). Battle of Stone's River December 30-31, 1862, and January 1-3, 1863. At Murfreesboro till June. Woodbury January 24. Expedition to Woodbury April 2. Snow Hill, Woodbury, April 3. Middle Tennessee
nsient young ladies of the Capitol Hotel. The presentation speech was written, memorized and rehearsed, and I have no doubt every thing would have gone off well but for one thing. Mr. Morgan didn't call; and now, while the dashing horse-thief is making remarkable time out of the State, the wreath is all withered and sere. An Illinois copperhead, present during the siege, indulged largely in fierce rebel talk, and deserves to be ventilated. His name is B. B. Pepper, and he hails from Springfield. It is hoped the people of Sangamon county will put Mr. Pepper in a box when he returns to them, and keep him at home. The loyal people of Kentucky do not want him, and the rebels despise him. Doubts have repeatedly been expressed in regard to Governor Bramlette's soundness on the national goose. No one present during the siege of Frankfort can for a moment doubt that the Governor is thoroughly, heartily, and enthusiastically loyal. The rebels and copperheads bear testimony to his
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
wn for a movement on Louisville. The messages were delivered within forty-eight hours and immediate steps were taken accordingly. General Bragg, having attempted but failed to draw General Buell to an attack, and knowing that he could reach the Ohio river by a practical route further west, began his movement to Bardstown on the 20th and reached there on the 23rd. After a few days spent there, leaving General Polk in command of the army, he made a tour of inspection through Danville via Springfield and Perryville to Lexington, and thence to Frankfort, where, on October 4th, Hon. Richard Hawes, who had been chosen by the council provisional governor to succeed Gov. George W. Johnson, killed at Shiloh, was inaugurated in form. The greater part of General Smith's army was then in the vicinity of the capital. In the meantime General Buell, whose army had all arrived at Louisville on the 29th of September, being fully equipped and reinforced by a large body of troops there, moved on
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
, 1, 81, 2; 83, 3; 86, 13; 91, 1; 94, 7; 96, 3; 100, 1; 117, 1; 135-A Operations about, May 8-21, 1864 55, 2, 55, 3; 81, 1, 81, 2; 83, 3; 94, 7; 96, 3 Spring Creek, Ala. 149, F10 Spring Creek, Ark. 10, 2; 153, G4; 160, F11 Spring Creek, Ga. 46, 1, 46, 2; 58, 1; 59, 3; 71, 7; 97, 3; 144, D7, 144, E2; 145, C1, 145, E1; 147, B13; 149, F10 Spring Creek, Tenn. 30, 2; 34, 4; 57, 2; 97, 1 Springdale, Miss. 71, 15; 154, E11 Springfield, Ga. 135-A Springfield, Ky. 118, 1; 150, B10; 151, H10 Springfield, Mo. 47, 1; 119, 1; 135-A; 160, C13; 171 Springfield, Ohio 135-A; 140, C1; 171 Springfield, Tenn. 24, 3; 30, 2; 118, 1; 135-A; 150, F5 Springfield, W. Va. 82, 3; 100, 1; 136, E4 Springfield Landing, La. 156, B6 Springfield Station, Va. 7, 1 Spring Hill, Ala. 110, 1; 148, E3 Spring Hill, Ga. 101, 21 Spring Hill, Mo. 153, B10; 161, A12 Spring Hill, Tenn. 24, 3; 30, 2; 117, 1; 135-A;
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