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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 44 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
ising two divisions of the Sixteenth and a detachment of the Seventeenth Army Corps, left Vicksburg on the 10th of March and reached the designated point on Red River one day earlier than that appointed by General Banks. The rebel forces at Fort De Russy, thinking to defeat him, left the fort on the 14th to give him battle in the open field; but, while occupying the enemy with skirmishing and demonstrations, Smith pushed forward to Fort De Russy, which had been left with a weak garrison, and Fort De Russy, which had been left with a weak garrison, and captured it, with its garrison, about 350 men, 11 pieces of artillery, and many small-arms. Our loss was but slight. On the 15th he pushed forward to Alexandria, which place he reached on the 18th. On the 21st he had an engagement with the enemy at Henderson's Hill, in which he defeated him, capturing 210 prisoners and 4 pieces of artillery. On the 28th he again attacked and defeated the enemy under the rebel General Taylor at Cane River. A mistake. A. J. Smith's command reached Cotile La
March 15. Owing to the disturbance of the popular mind produced by the enrolment of slaves for the army in Kentucky, Governor Bramlette issued an address to the people of that State, suggesting moderation, and calling upon them to uphold and maintain the Government as constituted, and obey and enforce its just demands, as the only hope of perpetuating free institutions. --Fort De Russy, on the Red River, below Alexandria, La., was captured this day by the combined military and naval forces of the United States, under General A. J. Smith and Admiral D. D. Porter.--(Docs. 96 and 131.)
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
divisions of the Sixteenth Corps under Mower, and Kilby Smith's division of the Seventeenth Corps, the whole under command of Brigadier-General A. J. Smith, landed at Simsport, near the head of the Atchafalaya, and the next morning marched on Fort de Russy. Walker's division of the Confederate army, under General Richard Taylor, which was holding the country from Simsport to Opelousas, at once fell back to Bayou Boeuf, covering Alexandria. A. J. Smith's march was therefore unmolested. He arrived before Fort de Russy on the afternoon of the 14th, and promptly carried the works by assault, with a loss of 34 killed and wounded, capturing 260 prisoners, eight heavy guns, and two field-pieces. Meantime the advance of Porter's fleet had burst through the dam and raft nine miles below, and was thus able to proceed at once up the river, arriving off Alexandria on the 15th. Kilby Smith followed on the transports with the remainder of the fleet, landed at Alexandria on the 16th, and occup
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
Hindman (Acting-Master John Pearce), and Cricket (Lieutenant H. H. Gorringe) were ordered to go ahead and clear the obstructions that were known to exist below Fort De Russy, a strong fortification constructed by the Confederates earlier in the war, recently strengthened, and now armed with heavy guns in casemates protected with railroad iron. Fort De Russy was captured by the navy in the first movement up the Red River in May, 1863, but was afterward abandoned when the army marched to Port Hudson (see Vol. III., p. 592).--editors. These obstructions were reached March 14th, and were found to consist of a row of piles across the river, supported by a secfort the guns of the Union forces were heard, so that for fear of injury to them the fleet could only fire a few rounds at the water-battery. The capture of Fort De Russy was a most gallant feat, General Mower actually riding into the fort at the head of his attacking column. Porter's orders to Phelps to push ahead were delayed
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 6.49 (search)
forces at Berwick Bay. On the 12th of March a column of ten thousand men, composed of portions of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Army Corps under General A. J. Smith, moved down from Vicksburg to Simsport, and advanced with such celerity on Fort De Russy, taking it in reverse, that General Taylor was not allowed time to concentrate and cover this important work, our only means of arresting the progress of the gun-boats. The fall of this work and the immediate movement of the enemy, by means I hoped, by refusing one of them, to fight the other with my whole force. It seemed probable at this time that Steele would advance first. When he reached Prairie d'ane, two routes were open to him: the one to Marshall, The Confederate Fort De Russy, about ten miles below Alexandria. From a sketch made soon after it was captured. crossing the river at Fulton, the other direct to Shreveport. I consequently held Price's infantry, under Churchill, a few days at Shreveport. Steele's hesi
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
ommanding A. P. Cooke, captured Butte à la Rose, with its garrison of sixty men, two heavy guns, and a large quantity of ammunition, and opened the way through the Atchafalaya to the Red River, the Arizona passing through and reaching Admiral Farragut above Port Hudson, on the 2d of May. On the 22d of April Banks moved on from Opelousas toward Alexandria, General William Dwight, of Grover's division, with detachments of cavalry and artillery, leading. Taylor retreated before these to Fort De Russy. That post he also abandoned as Banks came rapidly on, and fled through Alexandria toward Shreveport. On the march — a letter from Governor Moore, of Louisiana, to General Taylor, fell into the hands of General Banks. It contained an order from the Governor for Taylor to retreat slowly to Alexandria, and, if pressed, to retire to Texas. An intercepted letter showed that on the day before the advance of Banks's army from the vicinity of, Brashear City, Taylor had intended to attack
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
had driven into the wilds of Western Louisiana, See page 600, volume II. took heart, and soon reappeared with about four thousand followers, including a large number of Texas cavalry. He reoccupied Alexandria and Opelousas, and garrisoned Fort de Russy, early in June. He then swept rapidly through Fort De Russy. the State, over the route he had been driven a few weeks before, and pushed toward New Orleans, hoping to find it sufficiently weak in defenders to allow him to capture it, or aFort De Russy. the State, over the route he had been driven a few weeks before, and pushed toward New Orleans, hoping to find it sufficiently weak in defenders to allow him to capture it, or at least by his menace to draw Banks from Port Hudson, to defend it. Banks's outposts were drawn into Brashear City, where there seems to have been very little preparation made for a defense of that important interior post, and the vast amount of National property collected there. Even its only railway communication with New Orleans appears to have been strangely undefended, and it was not until word suddenly reached Lieutenant-Colonel Stickney, in command at Brashear, that the Confederates
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
ral A. J. Smith, and, passing up the Red River, capture Fort de Russy, and join Banks at Alexandria. The latter was to marchwas on the Atchafalaya and Red River, from Opelousas to Fort de Russy; Mouton's division, numbering about six thousand men, wuty of removing obstructions in the river, and to amuse Fort de Russy by a feigned. attack until the army should land at Simch 13, 1864. the entire opposing force fell back toward Fort de Russy. Mower, with a brigade, then reconnoitered toward Yellded to land the whole column, and march it overland to, Fort de Russy, a distance of about thirty miles; and at daybreak on trts arrived, on which Smith's troops had re-embarked at Fort de Russy. These landed and occupied the town. General Smith hany that died of disease. The gains were the capture of Fort De Russy, Alexandria, Grand Ecore, and Natchitoches, the openingfederate batteries, when he fell back to the remains of Fort de Russy, and took post there. Banks had also received a dispat
llow, 3.244-3.246; defeated at Tupelo by Gen. A. J. Smith, 3.248; his dash into Memphis, 3.248; repulsed by Gen. Rousseau at Pulaski, 3.416. Fortifications in Charleston harbor, description of, 1.117; anxiety of conspirators respecting, 1.120. Fort Anderson, capture of, 3.492. Fort Barlow, capture of, 2.173. Fort Beauregard, capture of, 2.120. Fort Blunt, Confederates repulsed at, 3.213. Fort Clark, capture of, 2.108. Fort Clinch, found abandoned by Dupont, 2.820. Fort de Russy, capture of, 3.254. Fort Donelson, siege of, 2.206-2.219; battle of, 2.215; surrender of, 2.220; effect of the fall of at home and abroad, 2.222; the author's visit to in 1866, 2.226; attempt of Wheeler to recapture, 3.116. Fort Fisher, expedition against under Gens. Butler and Weitzel and Admiral Porter, 3.476-3.481; second and( successful expedition against, 3.484-3.489; visit of the author to in 1866, 3.481. Fort Gaines, seizure of, 1.175; recapture of, 3.443. Fort Hattera
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
ck Taylor. Neither of these generals had any idea of operating below Alexandria, which was their natural base; for the gun-boats might get up that far very easily, but would find it a difficult matter to proceed further, as was proved in the end. The expedition sent by Farragut was composed of the wooden gun-boats Albatross, Estrella, Lieutenant-Commander A. P. Cooke, and Arizona, Volunteer-Lieutenant-Commander D. P. Upton, all under Lieutenant-Commander John E. Hart. It arrived off Fort de Russy on May 3d, and found the enemy in the act of abandoning the works and removing their guns. Two steamers were engaged in this duty, and two others were moored to the bank alongside the earthworks, with their bows down stream. Lieutenant-Commander Hart at once attacked them with Lieutenant Commander (now Captain) Augustus P. Cooke, U. S. N. his broadside guns and a regular battle commenced, the Confederate steamers returning the fire promptly, and it was kept up on both sides until a d
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