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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 25 23 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Fourth joint debate, at Charleston, September 18, 1858. (search)
acy Did you ever before hear of this new party called the Free Democracy? What object have these Black Republicans in changing their name in every county? They have one name in the north, another in the center, and another in the South. When I used to practice law before my distinguished judicial friend, whom I recognize in the crowd before me, if a man was charged with horse-stealing and the proof showed that he went by one name in Stephenson county, another in Sangamon, a third in Monroe, and a fourth in Randolph, we thought that the fact of his changing his name so often to avoid detection, was pretty strong evidence of his guilt. I would like to know why it is that this great Freesoil Abolition party is not willing to avow the same name in all parts of the State? If this party believes that its course is just, why does it not avow the same principles in the North, and in the South, in the East and in the West, wherever the American flag waves over American soil? A vo
he Federal troops, under Colonel Smith, of the Illinois Sixteenth, near Monroe station, thirty miles west of Hannibal, Mo., embracing 300 of the Iowa Third, 200 of the Illinois Sixteenth, and about 100 of the Hannibal Home Guards, was attacked by 1,600 secessionists, under Brigadier-General Harris. Although the Federals were surprised, they repelled the attack, drove the rebels back, killed four, and wounded several, besides capturing five prisoners and seven horses. Harris retreated to Monroe, where another skirmish occurred, in which the rebels were again repulsed. Smith then took up a position and sent messengers for reinforcements from Quincy.--Baltimore American, July 12.--(Doc. 76 1/2.) The Seventh Massachusetts Regiment, under command of Colonel D. N. Couch, left Taunton, Mass., this afternoon for the seat of war.--N. Y. Evening Post, July 10. The New Orleans True Delta of to-day has two characteristic articles, containing bold denunciations of the rebel leaders.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 6: Affairs at the National Capital.--War commenced in Charleston harbor. (search)
Navy in distant seas. In view of the threatening aspect of affairs, the crew of the Brooklyn was not discharged on her arrival, but was kept in readiness for duty. At the Cabinet meeting whose proceedings compelled Secretary Cass to resign, December 14, 1860. it was proposed to send her with troops to Charleston. The Secretary of the Navy (Toucey), it is alleged, refused to give the order for the purpose, I should have told you that Toucey has refused to have the Brooklyn sent from Monroe. --Autograph Letter of Charles to the Editor of the Charleston Mercury, December 22, 1860, already cited on page 148. and the President yielded; now, under the advice of General Scott and Secretary Holt, orders were given for her to be made ready to start at a moment's notice. This order was revealed to the conspirators. Virginians were ready to seize any vessels that might attempt to leave Norfolk with troops; and the lights of the shore-beacons in Charleston harbor were extinguished, and
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
ruder, with about fifteen thousand effective men, was in Texas, his main body covering Galveston and Houston; Walker's division, about seven thousand strong, was on the Atchafalaya and Red River, from Opelousas to Fort de Russy; Mouton's division, numbering about six thousand men, was between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe; Frederick Steele. and Price, with a force of infantry estimated at five thousand, and of cavalry from seven to ten thousand, held the road from Monroe to Camden and Arkadelphia, in front of Steele. Magruder could spare ten thousand of his force to resist an attack from the east, leaving his fortifications on the coast well garrisoned, while Price could furnish at least an additional five thousand from the north, making, with those in the vicinity of the Red River, an army of from twenty-five to thirty thousand men — a force equal to any that could be brought against them, even with the most perfect unity and co-operation of commands. G
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
The main body covered Galveston and Houston from an anticipated movement from Matagorda peninsula, still held by our troops; Walker's division, numbering 7,000 men, were upon the Atchafalaya and Red Rivers, from Opelousas to Fort De Russy; Mouton's division, between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; while Price, with two heavy divisions of infantry, estimated at 5,000, and a large cavalry force, estimated at from 7,000 to 10,000, held the country from Monroe to Camden and Arkadelphia, confronting Steele. Magruder could spare 10,000 of his force to resist an attack from the east, leaving his fortifications well garrisoned on the coast, while Price could furnish at least an additional 5,000 from the north, making a formidable army of from 25,000 to 30,000 men, equal to any forces that could be brought against them, even with the most perfect unity and co-operation of commands. This estimate of the strength of the enemy was given in my dispatch o
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
was struck twenty-seven times by shot and shell, one shot disabling the starboard engine. But when the Ouichita got into position and opened her broadside, the enemy fled in all directions, leaving their guns on the field, after dragging them some 500 yards from the water. The Confederates lost a great many men in killed and wounded. Ramsey then proceeded a long distance up the river through narrow bayous and shoal cut-offs, destroying grain and provisions of all kinds, nearly reaching Monroe, but was obliged to return owing to the rapidly falling water — not, however, until the object of the expedition had been accomplished. Harrisonburg had always been a troublesome place, from which constant expeditions were fitted out to raid along the Mississippi. The approaches to it had been strongly fortified, four forts on high hills commanding the river for two miles below the town and one mile above. Lieutenant-Commander Ramsey landed a force at this place and burned several of th
ur to one, was constrained to continue his retreat, by Mount Vernon, to Springfield; where Gen. Lyon, who had been delayed by lack of transportation, joined and outranked him on the 10th. Meantime, Gen. Harris, Jackson's Brigadier for north-eastern Missouri, had rallied a considerable force at Paris, near the Mississippi, and hence commenced the work of destroying the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. Col. Smith's Union force attacked him on the 10th at Palmyra, whence Harris fell back to Monroe, fifiteen miles west, where he destroyed much of the railroad property. Here he was again attacked by Smith, and worsted, losing one gun and 75 prisoners. He thereupon disappeared; but continued actively organizing guerrilla parties, and sending them out to harass and plunder Unionists, destroying their property through all this section, until he finally joined Price, with 2,700 men, at the siege of Lexington. In fact, all over Missouri, partisan fights and guerrilla outrages were now the
to repel — as we have seen See pages 57 and 101.--the efforts of our fleets and expeditions, which, after the fall of New Orleans and that of Memphis, assailed it from below and from above respectively and conjointly. Being the chief outlet for the surplus products of the State of Mississippi, connected with Jackson, its capital, 44 miles cast, by a railroad, and thus with all the railroads which traverse the State, as also with the Washita Valley, in northern Louisiana, by a railroad to Monroe, while the Yazoo brought to its doors the commerce of another rich and capacious valley, Vicksburg, with 4,591 inhabitants in 1860, was flourishing signally and growing rapidly until plunged headlong into the vortex of Rebellion and Civil War. Both parties to the struggle having early recognized its importance — Jefferson Davis, in a speech at Jackson, having in 1862 pronounced it indispensable to the Confederacy that the control of the Mississippi should not be surrendered to Federal pow
was in fact but 7,000 and operating upon a line several hundred miles distant, with purposes and results entirely unknown to me. Feb. 5, I was informed by Gen. Steele that, if any advance was to be made, it must be by the Washita and Red rivers; and that he might be able to move his command, by the way of Pine Bluff, to Monroe, for this purpose. This would have united our forces on Red river, and insured the success of the campaign. Feb. 28, he informed me that he could not move by way of Monroe; and March 4, the day before my command was ordered to move, I was informed by Gen. Sherman that he had written to Gen. Steele to push straight for Shreveport. March 5, I was informed by Gen. Halleck that he had no information of Gen. Steele's plans, further than that he would be directed to facilitate my operations toward Shreveport. March 10, Gen. Steele informed me that the objections to the route I wished him to take (by the way of Red river) were stronger than ever, and that he would
Doc. 76 1/2.-battle at Monroe Station, Mo., July 10, 1861. The following particulars of the affair at Monroe, being gathered from parties that were present, may be considered substantially correct. On Monday, Colonel Smith, hearing that the State troops, under General Harris, were encamped near Florida, left Monroe Station when they again retired toward Monroe Station. A short skirmish was here engaged in, without loss to either side. In the mean time, no guard having been left at Monroe, Capt. Owen entered the place with about 200 of the State forces, and burned the depot and some cars. The officers on the Hannibal and St. Joseph road report tnon to bear on the building. Owing to the distance at which they were placed and the unskilful working, they did no execution. During the constant interchange of shots that took place, two men, not connected with either side, but residents of Monroe, were killed. The name of one was Hotchkiss.--St. Louis Republican, July 13.
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