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P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 50 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 8 0 Browse Search
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favors which he received from Julia, the daughter of Augustus, whom he is supposed to have celebrated under the name of Corinna in his Elegies. But that this conjecture is unfounded, is proved (as Aldus Manutius has shown) by Ovid's saying, that hif the guilt of others. His banishment not having taken place till he was fifty years old, although his acquaintance with Corinna commenced when he was about twenty; and his avowed attachment to Corinna, even in those verses where he deplores his misnsistent with the suggestion that he had a criminal intercourse with Julia, or that Julia was shadowed under the name of Corinna. It may be gathered, also, from the whole contexture of the verses that are made to that mistress, that Corinna was not Corinna was not a woman of the highest quality. Whatever his fault was, Augustus continued inexorable, nor could the most submissive importunities and flattering addresses of our poet, though often repeated, get him recalled, or even so much as removed to a better
Elegy V: By Duke 'Twas noon when I, scorch'd with the double fire Of the hot sun and my more hot desire, Stretch'd on my downy couch at ease was laid, Big with expectance of the lovely maid. The curtains but half drawn, a light let in Such as in shades of thickest groves is seen, Such as remains when the sun flies away, Or when night's gone, and yet it is not day. This light to modest maids must be allow'd, Where shame may hope its guilty head to shroud. And now my love Corinna did appear, Loose on her neck fell her divided hair; Loose as her flowing gown, that wanton'd in the air. In such a garb, with such a grace and mien, To her rich bed came the Assyrian queen; So Lais looked when all the youth of Greece With adoration did her charms confess. Her envious gown to pull away I tried, But she resisted still, and still denied; But so resisted that she seem'd to be Unwilling to obtain the victory; So I at last an easy conquest had, Whilst my fair combatant herself betray'd. But when s
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy XII: He curses his letter because it was not answered. (search)
or with my wax for death my warrant seal; Worse than her scorn, what torture can I feel? From combs of Cosica the wax was ta'en, The latent poison was the lover's bane. Bees there from venom'd flow'rs their honey suck, And surely to my wax that venom stuck. Chance on the seal did my misfortune paint, And show'd my doom by the vermilion teint. Curse on the instruments of my disgrace ! May you lie rotting in some filthy place; By carts run o'er may you to bits be torn, And your mishap revenge Corinna's scorn ! The man that first to smooth your surface toil'd, The wooden work with hands impure defil'd; Gibbets and racks should of the wood be made, And the rough tools of all the murd'ring trade. Bats roosted in its branches as it grew, And birds of prey for shelter thither flew: The vulture, and all kind of rav'nous fowl, There hatch their young, and there the om'nous owl. How mad to use such tablets must I be? Curst and ill fated, as their parent tree! Were these fit things soft sentimen
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy XIII: To the Morning, not to make haste. By an unknown hand. (search)
Elegy XIII: To the Morning, not to make haste. By an unknown hand. Aurora, rising from old Tithon's bed, Does o'er the eastern skies her roses spread: Stay, beauteous morn, awhile thy chariot stay, Awhile with lagging wheels retard the day. So may young birds, as often as the spring Renews the year, o'er Memnon's ashes sing. Now I lie folded in Corinna's arms, And all her soul is mine, and all her charms; I now am to her panting bosom press'd, And now, if ever lover was, am bless'd. As yet sweet sleep sits heavy on our eyes, And warbling birds forbid, as yet to rise. Stay, beauteous morning, for to love-sick maids And youths, how grateful are these dusky shades! All stay, and do not, from the blushing east, With dawning glories break our balmy rest. When night's black mantle does those glories hide, The pilot by the stars his ship can guide, And in mid-sea a certain course pursue, As safe as when he has the sun in view. What pleasure in thy light should mortals take? Thou dost the
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy XIV: He comforts his mistress for the loss of her hair by the means she took to beautify it. By an unknown hand. (search)
hy own fair hands was wrought; Nor dost thou suffer for another's fault. How oft I bade thee, but in vain, beware The venom'd essence, that destroy'd thy hair? Now with new arts thou shalt thy pride amuse, And curls, of German captives borrow'd, use. Drusus to Rome their vanquish'd nation sends And the fair slave to thee her tresses lends. With alien locks thou wilt thy head adorn, And conquests gain'd by foreign beauties scorn. How wilt thou blush, with other charms to please, And cry, "How fairer were my locks than these !" By heav'ns, to heart she takes her head's disgrace, She weeps, and covers with her hands her face. She weeps, as in her lap her locks she views; What woman would not weep, such locks to lose! Ah, that they still did on her shoulders flow, Ah, that they now, where once they grew, did grow! Take courage, fair Corinna, never fear, Thou shalt not long these borrow'd tresses wear: Time for your beauty shall this loss repair And you again shall charm with native hair.
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy VI: On the Death of His Mistress's Parrot. By Creech. (search)
l, my present from the east, is dead. Best things are sooner snatch'd by cov'tous fate, To worse she freely gives a longer date; Thersites brave Achilles' fate surviv'd, And Hector fell, whilst all his brothers liv'd. Why should I tell what vows Corinna made? How oft she begg'd thy life, how oft she pray'd ? The seventh day came, and now the Fates begin To end the thread, they had no more to spin; Yet still he talk'd, and when death nearer drew, His last breath said, "Corinna, now adieu!" ThereCorinna, now adieu!" There is a shady cypress grove below, And thither (if such doubtful things we know) The ghosts of pious birds departed go; 'Tis water'd well, and verdant all the year, And birds obscene do never enter there; There harmless swans securely take their rest, And there the single Phoenix builds her nest; Proud peacocks there display their gaudy train, And billing turtles coo o'er all the plain: To these dark shades my parrot's soul shall go, And with his talk divert the birds below; Whilst here his bones
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy VIII: To Corinna's Chambermaid. By the same hand. (search)
's chamber, or the queen of love; Genteel, well-bred, not rustically coy, Not easy to deny desired joy; Thro' whose soft eyes still secret wishes shine, Fit for thy mistress' use, but more for mine; Who, Betty, did the fatal secret see? Who told Corinna you were kind to me! Yet when she chid me for my kind embrace, Did any guilty blush spread o'er my face! Did I betray thee, maid, or could she spy The least confession in my conscious eye ! Not that I think it a disgrace to prove Stol'n sweets, ears when lovers lie. Now, Betty, how will you my oaths requite? Come, pr'ythee let's compound for more delight; Faith, I am easy, and but ask a night. What! start at the proposal? how! deny Pretend fond fears of a discovery ? Refuse, lest some sad chance the thing betray ? Is this your kind, your damn'd obliging way ? Well, deny on; I'll lie, I'll swear no more; Corinna now shall know thou art a whore. I'll tell, since you my fair address forbid, How often, when, and where, and what we did!
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy XII: The Poet rejoices for the favours he has received of his mistress. (search)
Elegy XII: The Poet rejoices for the favours he has received of his mistress. Io Triumphe! I have won the prize, For in my arms the fair Corinna lies. Nor jealous husband, nor a guardian's care, Nor door defended with a double bar, Could fence against a lover's artifice, For in my arms the fair Corinna lies. With reason of my victory I boast, The conquest gain'd, and yet no blood is lost; I scal'd no walls, I pass'd no ditch profound, Safe were my wars, and all without a wound. My only work aCorinna lies. With reason of my victory I boast, The conquest gain'd, and yet no blood is lost; I scal'd no walls, I pass'd no ditch profound, Safe were my wars, and all without a wound. My only work a charming girl to gain; The pleasure well rewards the little pain. Ten years the Greeks did in one siege employ, But levell'd were, at length, the walls of Troy; What glory was there by th' Atrides won, So many chiefs before a single town! Not thus did I my pleasant toils pursue, And the whole glory to myself is due; Myself was horse and foot, myself alone The captain and the soldier was in one, And fought beneath no banner but my own. Whether by strength I combated, or wile, Fortune did ever o
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy XIII: To Isis. A prayer that the goddess would assist Corinna, and prevent her miscarrying. (search)
Elegy XIII: To Isis. A prayer that the goddess would assist Corinna, and prevent her miscarrying. With cruel art Corinna would destroy The ripening fruit of our reCorinna would destroy The ripening fruit of our repeated joy. While on herself she practises her skill, She's like the mother, not the child, to kill. Me she would not acquaint with what she did, From me a thing, whlks around Canope's walls, Who Memphis visit'st, and the Pharian tower, Assist Corinna with thy friendly powers. Thee by thy silver Sistra I conjure, A life so preciee thy votaries pray For speedy help, thy wanted help delay. Lucina, listen to Corinna's pray'r; Thy votary she, and worthy of thy care. I'll with my off'rings to th bless, In words inscrib'd, I'll on thy shrine express:- "Ovid, the servant of Corinna, pray'd The goddess here, the teeming dame to aid." Ah, goddess! of my humble my vow. If frighted as I am, I may presume Your conduct to direct in time to come, Corinna, since you've suffer'd thus before, Ah, try the bold experiment no more!
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy XVII: He tells Corinna he will always be her slave (search)
Elegy XVII: He tells Corinna he will always be her slave If there's a wretch, who thinks it is a shame, To serve a lovely and a loving dame: If such a slave he loads with infamy, I'm willing he should judge as hard of me; I'm willing all the world should know my shame If Venus will abate my raging flame. Let me a fair and gentle mistress have, And then proclaim aloud that I'm her slave. Beauty is apt to swell a maiden's mind, And thus Corinna is to pride inclin'd: But as she is above all maiden's fair, What's pride in them is insolence in her; Less fair I wish she was, or knew it less; How learnt she, she is lovely by her face! Her mirror tells her so, sheghtest dames Would in my verse immortalize their names. My muse the place of an estate supplies, And none that know her worth, her wealth despise. Some tempted by Corinna's spreading fame, In envy rob her, and usurp her name; What would they give, d'ye think, to be the same ? But neither could Eurotas, nor the Po, With poplar shade
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