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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 24 4 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 12, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Bladensburg (Maryland, United States) or search for Bladensburg (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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r in Philadelphia Press Sept. 5] If there is anything in human skill, artillery and destructive ordnance, I do not see how Washington can be taken. Wherever you look forts are seen. They command every hill, ford, bridge and ferry. From Bladensburg to Alexandria, from Alexandria to Chain Bridge, from Chain Bridge to Bladensburg, is one complete and unbroken line of defences. It would be as difficult to cross the Potomac within range of any of these points as it would have been to evade Bladensburg, is one complete and unbroken line of defences. It would be as difficult to cross the Potomac within range of any of these points as it would have been to evade the flaming sword of the guardian angel. Under their guns our army is now resting — gradually accumulating strength and preparing for another campaign. No one, however, anticipates an attack upon Washington from the Potomac. The generally accepted military theory is that the rebel armies will attempt to engage our troops at Fairfax, and, while diverting their attention, make a movement by way of Leesburg or Harper's Ferry, force a crossing at these points, occupy Maryland, and excite the