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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 123 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 100 62 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 55 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 20 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 20 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 20 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. You can also browse the collection for Cumberland (Maryland, United States) or search for Cumberland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 25: retreat to Virginia. (search)
y destroyed by the enemy's cavalry. The advance of the enemy resulted in a sharp engagement between a portion of our cavalry and a part of his troops on the Boonsboro road. In the position near Hagerstown, my division was posted across the Cumberland road on the southwest of the town, but on the next day it was moved further to the right so as to rest its right on the Hagerstown and Williamsport road, where it remained until just before dark on the 12th. In the meantime Meade's army, now rfor crossing the Potomac below Harper's Ferry, and threw his army into Loudoun, while General Lee prepared to intercept his march by crossing his army over the Blue Ridge into Culpeper. It having been ascertained that a force had moved from Cumberland in Maryland to the mouth of Back Creek west of Martinsburg, on the afternoon of the 20th, my division was ordered to move across North Mountain and then down Back Creek for the purpose of intercepting that force, while another division should h
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 30: Averill's raid and the winter campaign. (search)
it had been previously cut by Fitz. Lee, dislodging a guard from the latter place, and also in collecting a considerable number of cattle and sheep, with which he returned to Moorefield in two or three days. The, enemy, however, had moved from Cumberland with a large force of infantry and cavalry, and also a brigade of cavalry from Martinsburg to intercept, but he succeeded in passing in safety between the columns sent against him. McNeil's company and part of Gilmor's battalion had been sent wood lot of them. The morning after Rosser's return I made preparations to retire with the prisoners, plunder, cattle, and sheep in our possession, and as we were moving out of Moorefield, the enemy's force consisting of Kelly's command from Cumberland and Averill's brigade of cavalry came in view on the opposite banks of the river, and opened with artillery. Thomas' brigade, which had moved across to the valley of the South Fork, and commenced retiring, was brought back a short distance and
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 36: campaign in Maryland and Virginia. (search)
Mountain, and running northeast along its western base, passes through that mountain, four or five miles from Strasburg, and, then making a circuit, empties into the North Fork of the Shenandoah, about two miles below Strasburg. The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad crosses the Potomac at Harper's Ferry, and passing through Martinsburg in Berkeley County, crosses Back Creek near its mouth, runs up the Potomac, crossing the South Branch of that river near its mouth, and then the North Branch to Cumberland in Maryland. From this place it runs into Virginia again and, passing through Northwestern Virginia, strikes the Ohio River by two stems, terminating at Wheeling and Parkersburg respectively. There is a railroad from Harper's Ferry to Winchester, called Winchester & Potomac Railroad, and also one from Manassas Junction on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, through Manassas Gap in the Blue Ridge, by Front Royal and Strasburg to Mount Jackson, called The Manassas Gap Railroad, but both o
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 43: the burning of Chambersburg. (search)
yment of such a sum would have the effect of causing the adoption of a different policy. McCausland was also directed to proceed from Chambersburg towards Cumberland, Maryland, and levy contributions in money upon that and other towns able to bear them, and if possible destroy the machinery of the coal pits near Cumberland and thCumberland and the machine shops, depots and bridges on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad as far as practicable. On the 29th, McCausland crossed the Potomac near Clear Spring above Williamsport, and I moved with Rodes' and Ramseur's divisions and Vaughan's cavalry to the latter place, while Imboden demonstrated with his and Jackson's cavalry towaring the lapse of time which has occurred and the result of the war, I see no reason to regret my conduct on this occasion. He then moved in the direction of Cumberland, but on approaching that town, he found it defended by a force under Kelly too strong for him to attack, and he withdrew towards Hampshire County in Virginia, a
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 50: operations in 1865. (search)
s a severe one, and all material operations were suspended until its close. Late in February. Lieutenant Jesse McNeil, who was in command of his father's old company, with forty or fifty men of that company and Woodson's, made a dash into Cumberland, Maryland, at night and captured and brought off Major Generals Crook and Kelly, with a staff officer of the latter, though there were at the time several thousand troops in and around Cumberland. The father of this gallant young officer had perforCumberland. The father of this gallant young officer had performed many daring exploits during the war, and had accompanied me into Maryland, doing good service. When Sheridan was at Harrisonburg in October, 1864, Captain McNeil had burned the bridge at Edinburg in his rear, and had attacked and captured the guard at the bridge at Mount Jackson, but in this affair he received a very severe wound from which he subsequently died. Lieutenant Baylor of Rosser's brigade, who was in Jefferson County with his company, made one or two dashes on the enemy's outpos
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
l (U. S. A.), 158 Cox's House, 210, 220, 223 Coxe, Dr. (U. S. A.), 49 Craig's Creek, 328, 329 Crampton's Gap, 385, 386 Creigh, 380 Crittenden's House, 95, 96 Crook, General (U. S. A.), 370, 375, 379, 396, 398, 399, 406, 411, 417, 424, 425, 430, 443, 444, 461 Crooked Creek, 93 Cross Keys, 75 Crutchfield, Colonel, 176 Culpeper County, 285, 316, 317 Culpeper Court-House, 93, 94, 95, 96, 100, 101, 106, 165, 192, 237, 253, 277, 284, 302, 303, 316, 343, 407, 433 Cumberland, 282, 284, 338, 368, 402, 404, 461 Curtin, Governor, 257, 261 Custer, General (U. S. A.), 457, 458 Cutshaw's Battalion, 408, 413, 433, 435, 449 Cutt's Battalion, 198 Dabney, Major, 78 Dams, 59, 60, 63, 72, 80, 81, 109 Dance, Captain, 241, 307, 308, 310, 311, 313, 314, 315 Daniel, General, 346 Daniel, Major J. W., 187, 310, 314, 349, 359, 473, 474, 479, 480 Danville, 104 D'Aquin, Captain, 176, 180 Darien, 260 Darkesville, 283, 413 Davis, Eugene, 4