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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 123 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 100 62 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 55 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 20 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 20 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 20 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Cumberland (Maryland, United States) or search for Cumberland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Confederate Navy (search)
Merrimac, after being burned almost to the water-line, was saved after the Federals had left, and the Confederate authorities, under the direction of John M. Brooke, late lieutenant, United States navy, immediately started the reconstruction of the wreck on plans that were new to naval warfare. On the 8th of March, in the following year, the armored Merrimac, rechristened the Virginia, raised the hopes of the Confederacy, and closed the day of the wooden battle-ship by the sinking of the Cumberland and the destruction of the Congress in Hampton Roads, Virginia. The hopes she had roused, however, were shattered on the day following by the advent of Ericsson's Monitor. A number of other Federal ships were seized after the opening of hostilities, among which were the revenue cutters Aiken, Cass, Washington, Pickens, Dodge, McClelland, and Bradford. All of these boats were fitted out for privateering as quickly as possible, and went to sea with varying fortunes. The Aiken was rechr
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), First expeditions of the Federal Navy (search)
rders on the 26th of August, 1861. It was composed of the Minnesota (flagship) under command of Captain G. J. Van Brunt; the Wabash, under command of Captain Samuel Mercer; the Monticello, the Susquehanna, the Pawnee, the Harriet Lane, and the Cumberland. In addition there were the chartered transport steamers Adelaide and George Peabody, and the ocean-going tug Fanny. These vessels had in tow a number of schooners and surf-boats to be used in landing a small body of troops, less than a thousae heavy surf. But three hundred or so succeeded in reaching dry land, a rather forlorn end to the land expedition, as it had no supplies and the ammunition was soaked through. But in the mean time, the Wabash got under way, and towing the old Cumberland with the Minnesota following, led in toward Fort Clark. Soon the battle was on between the land and sea. Flag-Officer Stringham deserves great praise for the way he handled his small squadron; ships were kept in constant movement, and, though
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
e Federal squadron: the old Congress and the Cumberland well out in the stream, and farther down towThe Congress was just off the point, and the Cumberland a short distance above it. It was soon seen ress and made for the latter's consort. The Cumberland's broadside was across the The cheese box made for the starboard side of the towering Cumberland, receiving a heavy broadside and replying withe Merrimac steamed on and crashed into the Cumberland just forward of her fore channels. Like somith difficulty that she did so; in fact, the Cumberland was sinking steadily by the time she had worAmerican heart beat high with pride. As the Cumberland sank, even while the waters were entering he the Beaufort had opened the action that the Cumberland's keel rested on the bottom; then, with her e had to be abandoned. she had against the Cumberland for two reasons: there would be no sense in hot off. The ram was left in the side of the Cumberland. One anchor, the smoke-stack, and the steamp[4 more...]
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
terwards rear-admiral) sailed from Hampton Roads in the first naval expedition of the war. It achieved the first victory for the Federal cause, capturing Forts Hatteras and Clark at Hatteras Inlet on August 29th. Commodore Stringham, a veteran of the old navy, had with him four of the old ships of live oak in which American officers and men had been wont to sail the seas; and the forts at Hatteras Inlet were no match for the 135 guns which the Minnesota (flagship), Wabash, Susquehanna, and Cumberland brought to bear upon them, to say nothing of the minor armament of the Pawnee, Harriet Lane, and Monticello. But before another naval expedition could be undertaken, many of the gallant officers had to come down from their staunch old ships to command nondescript vessels purchased for the emergency, whose seaworthiness was a grave question. Yet these brave men never inquired whether their vessels would sink or swim, caring only to reach the post of danger and serve as best they could the
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
rch 1, 1862. U. S. gunboats Tyler, Lieut. Gwin, commanding, and Lexington, Lieut. Shirk, on an expedition up the Tennessee River, engaged and silenced a Confed. battery at Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. March 6, 1862. U. S. ironclad Monitor, Lieut. Worden, sailed from New York for Fort Monroe. March 8, 1862. Destruction of the U. S. sloop-of-war Cumberland and the frigate Congress, in action with the Confed. ironclad Merrimac, in Hampton Roads, Va. 120 men were lost on the Cumberland, and 121 on the Congress. March 9, 1862. Combat of the U. S. ironclad Monitor and the Confed. ironclad Merrimac, in Hampton Roads, Va. March 11, 1862. Occupation of St. Augustine, Fla., by Federal naval forces. March 12, 1862. Occupation of Jacksonville, Fla., by Federal forces from the U. S. gunboats Ottawa, Seneca, and Pembina, under command of Lieut. T. H. Stevens. March 17, 1862. Federal gunboats and mortars, under Foote, began the investment of and att