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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 68 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 52 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 46 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 45 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Westminster (Maryland, United States) or search for Westminster (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
rly the next morning, and, with his left at Westminster, occupy the railroad terminating at that pl Mills, on the road between Littlestown and Westminster. The Sixth Corps was ordered to move to Ma Stuart, with a large cavalry force, was in Westminster last night, and moved towards Gettysburg—su and Baltimore. Hence it marched direct on Westminster, reaching that place at 5 P. M. on June 29, remained strung out between that place and Westminster. Early on June 30 the cavalry was off agrains, except ambulances and ammunition, to Westminster and south of the railroad, as ordered. I ring sent the Third Brigade (Huey's) back to Westminster, to assist in guarding the wagon trains of ct the trains of the army and guard them to Westminster, where he could refit. Without replacing Bington, I shall fall back to my supplies at Westminster. I will endeavor to advise you as often asry and Quartermaster depots and supplies at Westminster will be transferred to Frederick. The Co[5 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
ear. I think there were about twentyfive guns with my trains at Westminster. I only had field-guns on the field. In reference to the re-at present at Gettysburg, two corps by the road to Taneytown and Westminster, and, after crossing Pipe creek, deploy towards Middleburg. Thesary, the trains and impedimenta will all be sent to the rear at Westminster. Corps commanders, with their officers commanding artillery, ons for the orderly and proper position of the trains in rear of Westminster. All the trains will keep well to the right of the road in movi trains ordered to Union Bridge, in these events will be sent to Westminster. General headquarters will be, in case of this movement, at Frie you here before going to the front. The trains will all go to Westminster and Union Bridge, as ordered. Daniel Butterfield, Major Generae between me and Washington, I shall fall back to my supplies at Westminster. I will endeavor to advise you as often as possible. In the
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix Y (search)
his movements. I have delayed attacking to allow the Sixth Corps and parts of other corps to reach this place and rest the men. Expecting a battle, I ordered all my trains to the rear. If not attacked, and I can get any positive information of the position of the enemy which will justify me in so doing, I shall attack. If I find it hazardous to do so, or am satisfied the enemy is endeavoring to move to my rear and interpose between me and Washington, I shall fall back to my supplies at Westminster. I will endeavor to advise you as often as possible. In the engagement yesterday the enemy concentrated more rapidly than we could, and towards evening, owing to the superiority of numbers, compelled the Eleventh and First Corps to fall back from the town to the heights this side, on which I am now posted. I feel fully the responsibility resting on me, but will endeavor to act with caution. George G. Meade, Major-General. As soon as the Sixth Corps had in the main arrived, and