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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 4 0 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 4 0 Browse Search
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-morrow sufficiently well as to steam under one boiler. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. M. Hobby, First Assistant Engineer, in charge. Lieutenant-Commander F. A. Roe, Commanding U. S. Steamer Sassacus. [Indorsement.] Agawam, May 16, 1864. The attention of the Navy Department is respectfully called to the gallant conduct of Lieutenant-Commander Roe, and that of the officers whom he recommends for promotion. S. P. Lee, Acting Rear-Admiral. Report of Lieut.-Comchief engineer's report. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, W. W. Queen, Lieutenant-Commander, commanding. Captain M. Smith, U. S..N., Commanding Officer in the Sounds of North Carolina. [Indorsement.] Agawam, May 16, 1864. Lieutenant-Commander Queen, his officers and men, appear to have done well their part in this gallant action. S. P. Lee, Acting Rear-Admiral. Report of Engineer H. H. Stewart. United States steamer Wyalusing, Albemarle
ite Winthrop's farm, at Ten Hills, and there done something in the fishing business; but we very soon find him, by his agent, engaged in building a bridge across Mistick River, at the place where the great bridge now stands. There could have been no motive for his building such a bridge, at such a time, and at his own expense, unless his men and business were in that neighborhood. That his operations were not confined to one spot appears from the fact that he had a fishing establishment at Agawam, by Merrimack, where, Aug. 8, 1631, some hostile Indians rifle the wigwam where Mr. Cradock's men kept to catch sturgeons, taking away their nets, biskets, &c. In the records of the General Court, held at Boston, Nov. 7, 1632, we have the following record: Mr. Mathew Cradock is fined £ 4 for his men being absent from training divers times. This was remitted, probably on account of the impossibility in a fisherman of being on. shore at any given period. At a General Court held at Boston,
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
combined mortar fleets of Davis and Porter. July 4, 1862. Confed. gunboat Teaser captured on James River by U. S. steamer Maratanza. On the deck of the Agawam The easy attitudes of the acting ensign, to the left of the gun, and the volunteer acting-master with him, do not suggest the storm through which the ship on which they stand, the Federal gunboat Agawam, passed in the spring of 1864. Their vessel was called upon to cooperate in Grant's great military movement that was to bring the war to a close. In February, Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, commanding the North Atlantic squadron, was ready to assist General Butler with gunboats in the in the James to prevent the Confederate gunboats from coming down, the Virginia and her consorts came down to reconnoiter the character of the obstructions. The Agawam, under Commander A. C. Rhind, was lying below Battery Dantzler, with several monitors. They were engaged by the fortification and by the Confederate gunboats con
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agawam, (search)
Agawam, The Indian name of Ipswich, Mass.; settled in 1633; incorporated under the present name in 1634. See Boston; Massachusetts.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Southampton, (search)
Southampton, A town in Suffolk county, N. Y., on the south shore of Long Island. It is noted as the oldest English settlement in the State; was known by the Indians as Agawam; settled by colonists from Massachusetts in 1640; passed under the jurisdiction of Connecticut in 1645; and has belonged to New York since 1664, when it was granted to the Duke of York. The town is also noted for having been occupied by the British during the Long Island campaign in the Revolutionary War, and for possessing the remains of a defensive work of that time.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ward, Nathaniel 1578-1652 (search)
d, Nathaniel 1578-1652 Author; born in Haverhill, Suffolk, England, about 1578; graduated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, in 1603; practised law and preached; became a member of the Massachusetts Company in 1630, and emigrated to the colony in 1634, where he was pastor at Agawam till 1637; took part in the settlement of Haverhill in 1640; returned to England in 1646, and was author of Body of liberties; The simple Cobbler of Agawam, etc. He died in Shenfield, Essex, England, in October, 1652.d, Nathaniel 1578-1652 Author; born in Haverhill, Suffolk, England, about 1578; graduated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, in 1603; practised law and preached; became a member of the Massachusetts Company in 1630, and emigrated to the colony in 1634, where he was pastor at Agawam till 1637; took part in the settlement of Haverhill in 1640; returned to England in 1646, and was author of Body of liberties; The simple Cobbler of Agawam, etc. He died in Shenfield, Essex, England, in October, 1652.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
amount $979,828.30. The following is the war record of each city and town in the county:— Agawam Incorporated May 17, 1835. Population in 1860, 1,698; in 1865, 1,665. Valuation in 1860, $6t, a justice of the peace, upon the petition of Hinsdale Smith, and twelve other legal voters of Agawam, on the 4th of May; at which it was voted to appropriate five hundred dollars to furnish arms, earily contributed to aid recruiting, and to those who had furnished substitutes for the army. Agawam furnished one hundred and seventy-two men for the war, which was a surplus of ten over and above63, $1,919.62; in 1864, $2,060.74; in 1865, $1,313.22. Total amount, $6,719.14. The ladies of Agawam formed a Soldiers' Relief Society in October, 1861. They met once a week during the war, and mah one hundred and eight men, West Springfield with eleven, Westfield with ten, Chester with ten, Agawam with seven, and Holland and Monson with two each. Springfield furnished twenty-five hundred
Index. A. Abington 536 Acton 367 Acushnet 116 Adams 60 Agawam 294 Alford 62 Amesbury 172 Amherst 331 Andover 175 Arlington (see West Cambridge) 467 Ashburnham 603 Ashby 369 Ashfield 254 Ashland 371 Athol 604 Attleborough 118 Auburn 606 B. Barnstable 27 Barre 607 Becket 65 Bedford 372 Belchertown 332 Bellingham 482 Belmont 373 Berkley 122 Berlin 609 Bernardston 256 Beverly 177 Billerica 375 Blackstone 611 Blandford 296 Bolton 613 Boston 582 Boxborough 377 Boxford 180 Boylston 616 Bradford 182 Braintree 483 Brewster 31 Bridgewater 538 Brighton 378 Brimfield 298 Brookfield 616 Brookline 485 Buckland 267 Burlington 381 C. Cambridge 382 Canton 490 Carlisle 391 Carver 540 Charlestown 393 Charlemont 259 Charlton 618 Chatham 33 Chelmsford 399 Chelsea 591 Ches
Stimpson, Jefferson,38Boston, Ma.Jan. 25, 1864Jan. 25, 1864, rejected recruit. Stone, Calvin,27Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Feb. 15, 1864, re-enlistment. Stone, Calvin,29Boston, Ma.Feb. 16, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Stone, Royal W.,33Rowe, Ma.Aug. 30, 1864Jan. 30, 1865, disability. Sullivan, Daniel,35Boston, Ma.Jan. 30, 1864Transferred Aug. 27, 1864, to 165th N. Y. V. Sullivan, Michael H.,20Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Sweet, George D.,21Agawam, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Sweet, George W.,34Taunton, Ma.Sept. 2, 1864June 11, 1865, expiration of service. Tate, James C.,36Charlestown, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 11, 1864, expiration of service. Tate, John M.,19Charlestown, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Tate, Moses F.,47Charlestown, Ma.July 31, 1861Died Aug. 10, 1862, New Orleans, La. Taylor, John,33Quincy, Ma.July 31, 1861May 20, 1863, disability. Thayer, Frederick L.,28Taunton, Ma.Se
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
oria died. American 1607. Landing at Jamestown. 1608. John Smith's True relation. 1620. Landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth. 1620. William Bradford's Hitory of Plymouth plantation. 1626. George Sandys's Translation of the first fifteen books of Ovid's Metamorphoses. 1630-1648. John Winthrop's History of New England. 1640. The Bay Psalm book by Richard Mather, John Eliot, etc. 1640. (The first book printed in America.) 1647. Nathaniel Ward's The simple Cobbler of Agawam. 1650. Anne Bradstreet's The Tenth Muse lately sprung up in America. 1662. Michael Wigglesworth's The day of doom. 1664. New Amsterdam became New York. 1673-1729. Samuel Sewall's Diary. 1675. King Philip's War. 1682. Philadelphia founded by Penn. 1689. Cotton Mather's Memorable Providences 1702. Cotton Mather's Magnalia 1706. Franklin born. 1729. William Byrd's History of the dividing line. 1732. Washington born. 1732. Franklin's Poor Richard's almanac b
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