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looked up the law in regard to my cases, and studied each point with great avidity, so that I substantially began the study of law then. I soon became proficient in the law of evidence, especially in the rules of pleading in criminal process. My studies, therefore, lasted frequently into the night, and I often called for my horse at the stable for a ride, after the hour of twelve had struck. This went on until the autumn of 1839, when a vacancy occurred in a small academy in the town of Dracut, across the Merrimack River, and the trustees asked me to take charge of the school. For my services I was to receive the tuition paid by the pupils, and that depended upon the number of scholars. It was a queer school. There were twenty-one scholars, about sixteen of whom were boys. The large portion of them were pupils who had found cause to leave the schools in Lowell, generally not because of their virtues. They ignored all discipline, and had routed the former preceptor. I, by hab
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 2: early political action and military training. (search)
Chapter 2: early political action and military training. Courtship and marriage Weds Miss Sarah Hildreth, of Dracut their four children why the youngest was sent to West Point a War every generation the Butler coat of arms Mrs. Butler during the Rebellion political course: governing principle and belief early campaign for shorter hours in Lowell mills hostility of manufacturers rise of the Democratic Free-soil Coalition State election of 1851 whoever votes the Ben. Butlehat portion of my life for whose pursuits I have had the greatest fondness, and I shall describe them in a continuous narrative later on. In the year 1839 I made the acquaintance of Fisher Ames Hildreth, the only son of Dr. Israel Hildreth, of Dracut, a town adjoining Lowell on the north side of Merrimack River. That acquaintance ripened into an affectionate friendship which terminated only with his death thirty years afterwards. Dr. Hildreth had a family of seven children, six of them be
orts to, 757. Dodge, Capt., Geo. S., faithful services at Bermuda Hundred, 899. Dodge, Colonel, telegram from, 784; prepared to ship troops on Roanoke expedition, 784. Douglas, Stephen A., as candidate for presidential nomination in 1860, 135, 138, 143, 145; views of slavery, 146,147,148; reference to, 982. Downing, Maj., Jack, incident of President Jackson, 976, 981. Dow, Col., Neal, stands by his men and Butler, 344; report regarding Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 369. Dracut, Mass., teaches school in, 73; home of future wife, 78. Draper, Colonel, raid into Virginia and North Carolina, 617-618. Drury's Bluff, battle of, 663, 666; in reference to, 833, 855; anecdote of, 891-892. Dubow, Colonel, reference to, 723. Dumas, Matthew, on the battle of Marengo, 865. Duncan, Gen. J. H., report on Porter's bombardment, 360, 361, 369; reference to, 371. Dupont, Captain (Admiral), 181,183. Duryea, Col. A., at Big Bethel, 267-272. Durant, Hon. Thomas J.,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Varnum, James Mitchell 1748- (search)
Varnum, James Mitchell 1748- Military officer; born in Dracut, Mass., Dec. 17, 1748; graduated at Rhode Island College (now Brown University) in 1769, and became a lawyer in East Greenwich, R. I. In 1784 he was commander of the Kentish Guards, from the ranks of which came General Greene and about thirty other officers of the Revolution. He was made colonel of the 1st Rhode Island Regiment in January, 1775, and soon afterwards entered the Continental army, becoming brigadier-general in February, 1777. He was at Red Bank (Fort Mercer), in command of all the troops on the Jersey side of the Delaware, when the British took Philadelphia; and it was under his direction that Major Thayer made his gallant defence of Fort Mifflin (q. v.). General Varnum was at Valley Forge the following winter; took part in the battle of Monmouth (June 28, 1778) ; joined Sullivan in his expedition to Rhode Island, serving under the immediate orders of Lafayette, and resigned in 1779, when he was chosen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Varnum, Joseph Bradley 1818-1874 (search)
of the New York legislature in 1849-51 and speaker in the latter year. His publications include The seat of government of the United States, and The Washington sketch-book. He died in Astoria, N. Y., Dec. 31, 1874. Legislator; born in Dracut, Mass., Jan. 29, 1750; brother of James M. Varnum; was an active patriot during the Revolution, both in the council and in the field; member of Congress in 1795-1811; speaker of the tenth and the eleventh Congresses; and United States Senator in 181born in Dracut, Mass., Jan. 29, 1750; brother of James M. Varnum; was an active patriot during the Revolution, both in the council and in the field; member of Congress in 1795-1811; speaker of the tenth and the eleventh Congresses; and United States Senator in 1811-17. He had been made major-general of militia at an early day, and at the time of his death, in Dracut, Mass., Sept. 21, 1821, was the oldest officer of that rank in Massachusetts, and also senior member of the United States Senate.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
I have no doubt two thousand dollars were subscribed for these purposes, and it was expended under their direction. Dracut Incorporated Feb. 26, 1701. Population in 1860, 1,881; in 1865, 1,905. Valuation in 1860, $962,723; in 1865, $1,109,30, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 6th of May, at which it was voted to pay each man belonging to Dracut who has gone, or may go, to assist the Government of the United States in the maintenance of the Union, ten dollars a monOne thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same, and two thousand dollars to raise and equip a military company in Dracut. November 5th, The action of the selectmen in paying Edward Coburn thirty dollars was approved, he having been wounded iunty in gold, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow an additional sum of eleven hundred and twenty-five dollars. Dracut furnished two hundred and eighteen men for the war, which was a surplus of eleven over and above all demands. One was a
40 Charlestown 393 Charlemont 259 Charlton 618 Chatham 33 Chelmsford 399 Chelsea 591 Cheshire 66 Chester 299 Chesterfield 334 Chicopee 300 Chilmark 164 Clarksburg 68 Clinton 619 Cohasset 491 Colerain 260 Concord 401 Conway 261 Cummington 335 D. Dalton 69 Dana 621 Danvers 184 Dartmouth 124 Dedham 493 Deerfield 262 Dennis 35 Dighton 125 Dorchester 497 Douglas 622 Dover 500 Dracut 402 Dudley 624 Dunstable 404 Duxbury 542 E. East Bridgewater 543 Eastham 37 Easthampton 336 Easton 127 Edgartown 166 Egremont 71 Enfield 339 Erving 264 Essex 187 F. Fairhaven 130 Falmouth 38 Fall River 133 Fitchburg 625 Florida 73 Foxborough 501 Framingham 405 Franklin 502 Freetown 137 G. Gardner 628 Georgetown 188 Gill 265 Gloucester 191 Goshen 341 Gosnold 168 Grafton 630
ce was engaged in a war with the Indians, representing that in the month of July last past, he was commissionated and appointed to be Colonel of all the forces in the western frontiers of Middlesex and Essex, together with the town of Brookfield, by his Honor the Lieutenant Governor, and that he had visited all the stations at great personal expense, and at the hazard of his life; he reported the number of men now in the service of this Government in the towns following, viz.: Dunstable, 40; Dracut, 12; Almsbury, 10; Haverhill, 12; Groton, 14; Lancaster, 14; Turkey-Hills, 12; Rutland, 25; Brookfield, 10; total, 149. Ibid., LXXII. 169-172. At a later period, Rev. Ammi-Ruhamah Cutter (a Cambridge man), H. C. 1725, having been dismissed from his charge at North Yarmouth, served his country as Captain several years before his death, which occurred at Louisburg in March, 1746. Cutter Family, 55-59. The names of a few non-commissioned officers and privates also, during these troublou
minister at Marblehead, d. 3 Feb. 1849, a. 66; Benjamin Dixon, grad. H. C. 1810, a physician in Lowell, d. here 7 Feb. 1853, a. 63; Mary, m. Willard Buttrick of Dracut 28 April 1799; Elizabeth, d. here unm. 6 Aug. 1873, a. 85; Susan, d. here unm. 6 Oct. 1875, a. 85. Abiah, m Jonathan Sanders 24 Oct. 1669. Mary, m. Thomas Thwnn, bap. here 3 Ap. 1698); Mary, bap. 11 Dec. 1698, m. Thomas Dana 22 Jan. 1718-19, and d. 10 Oct. 1739; Thomas, bap. 15 Dec. 1700, grad. H. C. 1718, minister at Dracut, d. 18 Mar. 1765. Josiah the f. was a Captain and served in the war against the Indians; he was in command at Groton 21 July 1706, when Nathaniel Healy of Newtohen he sold the estate to Samuel Goffe. Mr. Read was a tanner, and had previously resided in Boston. He removed hence, was in Dunstable 5 Mar. 1686-7, and d. at Dracut about 1710. He had one dau. who was the wife of Mr. Samuel Whiting 5 Oct. 1710. 2. James, m. Sarah Batson 12 Aug. 1714; she d. 25 Nov. 1721, and he m. Mary Ol
ersmith, was elected Register of Deeds in 1795, and soon removed here. He remained in office until his death, 29 Sept. 1821. The names of his children, recorded here, were Lydia, d. 25 Sept. 1796; Joanna, d. 21 Oct. 1837, a. 44; and Joseph, b. July 1799, and d. 2 Oct. 1799. Besides these, he had, Samuel; John, grad. H. C. 1805, minister at Marblehead, d. 3 Feb. 1849, a. 66; Benjamin Dixon, grad. H. C. 1810, a physician in Lowell, d. here 7 Feb. 1853, a. 63; Mary, m. Willard Buttrick of Dracut 28 April 1799; Elizabeth, d. here unm. 6 Aug. 1873, a. 85; Susan, d. here unm. 6 Oct. 1875, a. 85. Abiah, m Jonathan Sanders 24 Oct. 1669. Mary, m. Thomas Thwing 19 May 1731. Join, m. Tabitha Kidder 3 May 1759. Barstow, George (Bearstow, Baistow, and Baisto, on Town and Probate Records), d. here 18 Mar. 1653-4. His w. Susanna, who was dau. of Thomas Marrett of Camb., d. 11 Ap. 1654. They left two children, Margaret, aged four years, and George aged two years, who were taken into th
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