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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 2 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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Your search returned 20 results in 7 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ames, Oakes, 1804-1873 (search)
Ames, Oakes, 1804-1873 Manufacturer; born in Easton, Mass., Jan. 10, 1804; received a public school education; entered his father's workshop and became thoroughly familiar with the manufacture of shovels and picks. Subsequently he became a member of the firm of Oliver Ames & Sons. During the gold excitement in California and in Australia this firm had an enormous trade with miners, and during the Civil War it furnished the government with extensive supplies of shovels and swords. When the Union Pacific Railroad was being built the firm held large contracts which afterwards were transferred to a corporation known as the Credit Mobilier of America, of which Oakes Ames became one of the largest stockholders. In 1862-73 he was a member of Congress from Massachusetts. His connection with the Credit Mobilier, including an allegation of having improperly given stock to several members of Congress, was investigated by a committee of the House of Representatives and he was censured b
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), La Farge, John 1835- (search)
Couture and William M. Hunt, studied painting. He began his career by decorative work and by painting religious subjects; devoting his early years principally to painting flowers and landscapes and to illustrating magazines and books. He next took up mural painting, nearly all of which was of a religious character. Later he devoted his whole time to the making of stained glass windows, for which he invented the method known as American in Europe. This method entirely changed the old process of the glass stainer. His work in this line has been done principally in churches and residences in New York, Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Washington, and other cities, and probably his most notable achievements are the Battle window in the Harvard Memorial Hall, and the Ames Memorial window, in Easton, Mass. He became a member of the National Academy of Design in 1869, and in 1900 was president of the Society of American Artists. He is author of Lectures on art; Letters from Japan, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tupper, Benjamin 1738-1792 (search)
Tupper, Benjamin 1738-1792 Military officer; born in Stoughton, Mass., in August, 1738; was a soldier in the French and Indian War, and afterwards taught school in Easton. He was very active in the siege of Boston, and was colonel of a Massachusetts regiment early in 1776. In August of that year he commanded the gunboats and galleys in the Hudson River; served under Gates in the Northern army in 1777; was in the battle of Monmouth the next year; and before the end of the war was made a brigadier-general. Tupper was one of the originators of the Ohio Land Company, and was appointed surveyor of Ohio lands in 1785. In suppressing Shays's insurrection (q. v.) he was distinguished. He settled at Marietta in 1787, and became judge in 1788. He died in Marietta, O., in June, 1792.
Company A, Union Light Guards, Canton. Officers: Ira Drake, of Stoughton, captain; Henry U. Morse and Walter Cameron, of Canton, lieutenants. At this time, Lieutenant Cameron was in New Orleans; and John McKay, Jr., of Canton, was chosen to fill the vacancy. Lieutenant Cameron, however, soon after returned home, and joined his company at Fortress Monroe. Company B, Light Infantry, Easton. Officers: Milo M. Williams, captain; Linton Waldron and William E. Bump, Jr., lieutenants,—all of Easton. Company C, Light Infantry, Braintree. Officers: Cephas C. Bumpus, captain; James T. Stevens and Isaac P. Fuller, lieutenants,—all of Braintree. Company D, Light Infantry, Randolph. Officers: Horace Niles, captain; Otis S. Wilbur and H. Frank Wales, lieutenants,—all of Randolph. Company E, Light Infantry, South Abington. Officers: Charles F. Allen, captain; Lewis Soule and John W. Mitchell, lieutenants,—all of South Abington. Company F, Warren Light Guards, Foxborough. Officers
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
63, $1,713.00; in 1864, $1,893.12; in 1865, $1,167.24. Total amount in four years, $6,622.62. Easton Incorporated Dec. 21, 1725. Population in 1860, 3,067; in 1865, 3,087. Valuation in 1860, $vice. A committee was appointed with authority to pay aid to the soldiers' families residing in Easton, at their discretion. July 11th, The town voted to raise by taxation three thousand dollars, toongest, as well as the freest, government of the world. Resolved, That we, the inhabitants of Easton, deeply sensible of the importance of a speedy compliance with the President's late call, althouars to each volunteer, to fill the quota of the town, whether he is an inhabitant of the town of Easton or otherwise. 1863. No action appears to have been necessary by the town, in its corporate cain 1864, $4,800.00; in 1865, $2,800.00. Total amount in four years, $20,505.59. The ladies of Easton deserve honorable mention, and great credit, for important and valuable services rendered to the
eb. and d. 2 Mar. 1737-8; John, b. 24 Feb. 1738-9, d. in Auburn, 26 Feb. 1812; Sarah, b. 29 Nov. 1740, d. young; Henry, b. 17 Nov. 1742; Sarah, b. 1 July 1744; Lydia, b. 22 May 1746; Solomon, b. 13 Aug. 1748, d. at Edenton, N. C.; Mary, b. 12 Aug. 1751, m. Amos Binney of Hull, and was mother of the late Amos Binney, Navy Agent at Boston. Rev. Mr. Prentice was dismissed from his charge at Grafton 10 July 1747, on account of his favoring the preaching of Whitefield. He afterwards preached in Easton a few years, then in Bellingham, then in Hull from 1768 to 1772, and afterwards returned to Grafton, where he d. 22 May 1773, a. 68. [For most of the particulars in this paragraph, I am indebted to Binney's History of the Prentice Family.] 17. Samuel, s. of Solomon (9), m. Elizabeth Cook 23 Dec. 1736, and had Lydia, b. 11 Mar. 1737-8, m. Samuel Whitney of Wat. 15 Jan. 1765; Elizabeth, b. 2 Ap. 1741, d. here unm. 10 Aug. 1817. Samuel the f. res. in Wat. and d. between 30 Sept. and 6 Nov
eb. and d. 2 Mar. 1737-8; John, b. 24 Feb. 1738-9, d. in Auburn, 26 Feb. 1812; Sarah, b. 29 Nov. 1740, d. young; Henry, b. 17 Nov. 1742; Sarah, b. 1 July 1744; Lydia, b. 22 May 1746; Solomon, b. 13 Aug. 1748, d. at Edenton, N. C.; Mary, b. 12 Aug. 1751, m. Amos Binney of Hull, and was mother of the late Amos Binney, Navy Agent at Boston. Rev. Mr. Prentice was dismissed from his charge at Grafton 10 July 1747, on account of his favoring the preaching of Whitefield. He afterwards preached in Easton a few years, then in Bellingham, then in Hull from 1768 to 1772, and afterwards returned to Grafton, where he d. 22 May 1773, a. 68. [For most of the particulars in this paragraph, I am indebted to Binney's History of the Prentice Family.] 17. Samuel, s. of Solomon (9), m. Elizabeth Cook 23 Dec. 1736, and had Lydia, b. 11 Mar. 1737-8, m. Samuel Whitney of Wat. 15 Jan. 1765; Elizabeth, b. 2 Ap. 1741, d. here unm. 10 Aug. 1817. Samuel the f. res. in Wat. and d. between 30 Sept. and 6 Nov