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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
ant by the Charleston bonfire and its imitations at the North—the town meetings in Boston, New Lib. 5.145. York, Philadelphia and elsewhere, all concentrating their indignation and malice on the imported travelling incendiary. At a convention in Lynn on August 5, a stone meant for Mr. Thompson was thrown through the window and struck a lady in the audience. The next evening he lectured again, and was mobbed by three hundred disturbers, from whom he only escaped by accepting Ms. Aug. 7, 1835,s, happily made an opening through the crowd, and drove at a tremendous speed for Leverett Street. But many of the rioters followed even with superior swiftness, and repeatedly attempted to arrest the progress of the horses. James N. Buffum, of Lynn, was sitting in his buggy on Court Street as the struggling carriage approached. The horses drew off to the side nearest the buggy, and, in doing so, the hubs of the two vehicles came so close together as to brush off the rioters from one side.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
Liberator, but aiming to write regularly for the paper. Since the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society he had attended four others, to each of which a word must be given. One was the quarterly meeting of the same Society at Lynn, March 28, memorable for the maiden speech, in the anti-slavery cause, of Wendell Phillips, Son of John Phillips, the first mayor of Boston; a graduate of Harvard College in the class of 1831. He had studied law, as has been already noticed (aorn at Seabrook, N. H., in 1789. His parents, Joseph and Lois Philbrick, were Quakers; the father, a farmer, being a preacher in that denomination. His schooling was finished at the academy in Sandwich, Mass., and he began his business career in Lynn, after marrying in 1816 Eliza, only daughter of Edward and Abigail Southwick, of Danvers. His sympathy with Mary Newhall's New Light movement led to the sectarian disownment of himself and wife. As already noted (ante, 1.145), he was one of the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
ic and martyr times. So it must be with you here, as a matter of dire and unavoidable necessity; because it is not to be supposed that the jacobinical spirit of slavery and the atrocious spirit of prejudice are less prevalent here than they were in distant New England ( History of Pennsylvania Hall, p. 71). When she sat down, Esther Moore (a Friend) Ante, 1.398. made a few remarks, then Lucretia Mott, and finally Abby History of Penn. Hall, pp. 126, 127. Kelley, a noble young woman from Lynn. Her speech so affected Theodore D. Weld that, at the close of the meeting, he urged her to take the field as an anti-slavery lecturer; and, laying his hand upon her shoulder, he said, in his vehement way, Abby, if you don't, God will smite you! She obeyed his voice (and her own internal prompting) in the spring of 1839. The meeting broke up about 10 o'clock, and we all got safely home. The next day, the street was thronged with profane ruffians and curious spectators—the women, howe
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
their support from such associations, and to endeavor to bring the members of them to repentance for the sin of stopping their ears at the cry of the poor. At Lynn, on March 10 and 11. 1840, before a large and Lib. 10.46, 47. enthusiastic assembly gathered in quarterly meeting of the Essex County Anti-Slavery Society, Mr. Gaer resolutions, bearing the stamp of the editor of the Liberator, and anticipating Mr. Seward's famous dictum as to an irrepressible conflict, were also adopted at Lynn, in these words: Resolved, That Freedom and Slavery are natural and Lib. 10.46. irreconcilable enemies; that it is morally impossible for them to endure toe sub-treasury (Lib. 10.179). that this influence has increased, is increasing, and cannot be destroyed, except by the destruction of slavery or the Union. The Lynn resolutions against a Third Party found a special motive in the call for another convention to Lib. 10.31. nominate Presidential candidates (again at Albany) on A
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
th dismay some of our professed anti-slavery friends. Cowards! not to know that truth is mightier than error, and that it is darkness, and not light, that is afraid of investigation. Several of our subscribers have already discontinued their papers on account of the publication of the call in the Liberator, and more, I suppose, will soon follow their Lib. 10.167. example. The New Hampshire Panoply, Vermont Chronicle, New York Observer, Zion's Herald, Boston Transcript, Greenfield Gazette, Lynn Puritan, American Sentinel, etc., etc., are out in full blast about it. They attribute it all to me, of course; some of them insisting that my name is appended to the call. You will see, in the next Liberator, what they have said. This Lib. 10.177, 183. will be the occasion of a fresh attack upon my devoted head, and also upon the Liberator, to crush it. But, truly, none of these things disturb me. I can smile at Satan's rage, and face a frowning world, for my trust is in the Lord, and Chr
Bartlett, William Francis, 1.330. Bassett, William [b. Lynn, Mass., Mar. 4, 1803; d. there June 21, 1871], at Peace Conventott, 394; to speak on India, 388. Boyce, James P. [b. Lynn, Mass., 1805; d. there, 1885], 2.228. Boyle, James, Rev., leport, Mass., Oct. 14, 1842], 1.16, 18; learns shoemaking in Lynn, 27; to Baltimore with his mother, 31, apprenticed at shoem Baptist choir, 29; pet cats, 30, 221; learns shoemaking in Lynn, 30; voyage to Baltimore with his mother, 31, return to New.319, 320. Lethem, Matthew, 2.398. Lewis, Alonzo [b. Lynn, Mass., Aug. 28, 1794; d. Jan. 21, 1861], poet and teacher, 1.2ttendance and singing, 27; visit to Nova Scotia, removal to Lynn, 27, to Baltimore with the Newhalls, 31; a nurse again, 32,., 1800; d. Philadelphia, Aug. 1, 1884], 2.353. Puritan (Lynn), 2.424. Purvis, Robert [b. Charleston, S. C., Aug. 4, 1sination, 490, 517, 2.4, and kidnapping, 1.49, 519, 2.3; to Lynn with G., 1.491; assailed by P. Sprague, 497, 510, 516; give