Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Sheffield, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Sheffield, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnard, Frederick Augustus porter, 1809-1889 (search)
Barnard, Frederick Augustus porter, 1809-1889 Educator; born in Sheffield, Mass., May 5, 1809; was graduated at Yale College in 1828; president of the University of Mississippi in 1856-58, and chancellor in 1858-61. In 1861, on account of the Civil War, he resigned his offices in the university. He was president of Columbia F. A. P. Barnard. College, New York City, in 1864-88. At various times he held responsible appointments under the United States government, and was a member of many scientific and literary societies. He was a strong advocate of the higher education of women, and was instrumental in founding the women's Annex to Columbia College, which afterwards was given his name, and in 1900 was made a part of Columbia University. Among his works are Letters on College government; Report on collegiate education; Art culture; History of the American coast survey; University education; Undulatory Theory of light; Machinery and processes of the industrial Arts, and appar
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnard, John gross, 1815-1882 (search)
Barnard, John gross, 1815-1882 Military engineer: born in Sheffield, Mass., May 19, 1815; was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1833, and entered the engineer corps. He was made captain in 1838; major in 1858; brevet brigadier-general of volunteers in 1861; lieutenant-colonel of regulars in 1863; brevet major-general of volunteers in 1864; brevet brigadier-general and brevet major-general of regulars, March, 1865; and colonel of the corps of engineers, regular army, Dec. 28, the same year. During the war with Mexico he fortified Tampico, and made surveys of the battle-fields around the capital. In 1850-51 he was chief engineer of the projected Tehuantepec Railroad; and in 1855-56 he was superintendent of the United States Military Academy. He was chief engineer of the Army of the Potomac, 1861-62; also chief engineer of the construction of the defences of the national capital from September, 1862, to May, 1864. He was chief engineer of the armies in the field
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fellows, John 1733-1808 (search)
Fellows, John 1733-1808 Military officer; born in Pomfret, Conn., in 1733; was in the French and Indian War (q. v.); was a member of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress in 1775; led a company of minute-men to Cambridge after the skirmish at Lexington, and was made brigadiergeneral of militia in June, 1776. He commanded a brigade in the battles of Long Island, White Plains, and Bemis's Heights, and was very active in the capture of Burgoyne, October, 1777. After the war he was high sheriff of Berkshire county. He died in Sheffield, Mass., Aug. 1, 1808.