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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. (search)
Rhodes; G, 1st R. I., Capt. George W. Adams; M, 5th U. S., Capt. James McKnight. Ninth Army Corps, This corps participated in the Wilderness and Spotsylvania campaigns, under the direct orders of Lieut.-Gen. U. S. Grant, until May 24th, 1864, when it was assigned to the Army of the Potomac. Major-General Ambrose E. Burnside. Provost Guard: 8th U. S., Capt. Milton Cogswell. first division, Brig.-Gen. Thomas G. Stevenson. First Brigade, Col. Sumner Carruth: 35th Mass., Maj. Nathaniel Wales; 56th Mass., Col. Charles E. Griswold; 57th Mass., Col. William F. Bartlett; 59th Mass., Col. J. Parker Gould; 4th U. S., Capt. Charles H. Brightly; 10th U. S., Maj. Samuel B. Hayman. Second Brigade, Col. Daniel Leasure: 3d Md., Col. Joseph M. Sudsburg; 21st Mass., Lieut-Col. George P. Hawkes; 100th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Matthew M. Dawson. Artillery: 2d Me., Capt. Albert F. Thomas; 14th Mass., Capt. J. W. B. Wright. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Robert B. Potter. First Brigade, Col. Zenas R. Bl
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
and two boys, of whom the first-born son became the third of the name in the family. He died in 1790, at the age of ninety, having been the husband of Mary Eggleston, (who preceded him twelve months to the spirit world,) for the long period of sixty-five years. Mary, the eldest child of this marriage, remained a spinster till her death at the age of one hundred. John, the third, was born November 4, 1728; married Hannah Owen in 1758; John Owen, the ancestor of Hannah, was a native of Wales. He was among the first settlers of Windsor, where he was married in 1650. was the father of John, Frederick, Owen, and Abiel Brown; and the honored grandfather of Captain John Brown, the hero of Kansas and Harper's Ferry. John Brown, the third, at the outbreak of the revolutionary war, was chosen Captain of the West Simsbury (now Canton In 1806, West Simsbury, with a narrow strip of New Hartford, was incorporated, by act of legislature, into a township named Canton.) trainband; and, in
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: the child and his ancestors. (search)
and two boys, of whom the first-born son became the third of the name in the family. He died in 1790, at the age of ninety, having been the husband of Mary Eggleston, (who preceded him twelve months to the spirit world,) for the long period of sixty-five years. Mary, the eldest child of this marriage, remained a spinster till her death at the age of one hundred. John, the third, was born November 4, 1728; married Hannah Owen in 1758; John Owen, the ancestor of Hannah, was a native of Wales. He was among the first settlers of Windsor, where he was married in 1650. was the father of John, Frederick, Owen, and Abiel Brown; and the honored grandfather of Captain John Brown, the hero of Kansas and Harper's Ferry. John Brown, the third, at the outbreak of the revolutionary war, was chosen Captain of the West Simsbury (now Canton In 1806, West Simsbury, with a narrow strip of New Hartford, was incorporated, by act of legislature, into a township named Canton.) trainband; and, in
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
s repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $179.62; in 1862, $746.57; in 1863, $785.00; in 1864, $658.80; in 1865, $200.00. Total amount, $2,569.99. Wales Incorporated September 18, 1762. Population in 1860, 677; in 1865, 696. Valuation in 1860, $277,868; in 1865, $254,600. The selectmen in 1861 were Warren Se citizens who had voluntarily expended of their own private means to encourage recruiting, to pay bounties to volunteers, and to furnish aid to their families. Wales furnished eighty-two men for the war, which was a surplus of nine over and above all demands. Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropri Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $155.00; in 1862, $891.12; in 1863, $1,362.21; in 1864, $1,202.46; in 1865, $750. Total amount, $4,360.79. The ladies of Wales were active and liberal on behalf of the soldiers from the beginning to the end of the war, and every few weeks sent to the army hospitals, for the sick and wound
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
te aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $86.57; in 1862, $724.00; in 1863, $1,115.00; in 1864, $1,330.00; in 1865, $478. Total amount, $3,733.57. The ladies of Marion, we are briefly informed, contributed money and clothing for the sick and wounded. Marshfield Incorporated March 2d, 1640. Population in 1860, 1,870; in 1865, 1,810. Valuation in 1860, $729,709; in 1865, $853,777. The selectmen in 1861 were Daniel Stevens, John Baker, Wales R. Cleft; in 1862 and 1863, Daniel Stevens, Charles P. Wright, Charles W. Macomber; in 1864 and 1865, Luther Hatch, George M. Baker, Henry P. Oakman. The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Luther Hatch. The town-treasurer during the same period was Daniel Stevens. 1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters relating to the war was held on the 1st of May, at which the town voted to raise five thousand dollars to be regarded as a war fund for the defence of our ri
efield) 450 Southwick 316 Spencer 678 Springfield 318 Sterling 679 Stockbridge 104 Stoneham 452 Stoughton 522 Stow 454 Sturbridge 681 Sudbury 455 Sunderland 286 Sutton 682 Swampscott 245 Swanzey 156 T. Taunton 158 Templeton 684 Tewksbury 457 Tisbury 168 Tolland 320 Topsfield 246 Townsend 458 Truro 51 Tyngsborough 460 Tyringham 106 U. Upton 686 Uxbridge 687 W. Wakefield 450 Wales 321 Walpole 524 Waltham 461 Ware 359 Wareham 577 Warren 689 Warwick 288 Washington 108 Watertown 463 Wayland 466 Webster 690 Wellfleet 54 Wendell 289 Wenham 249 West Bridgewater 578 West Brookfield 695 Westborough 692 West Boylston 694 West Cambridge (Arlington) 467 Westfield 323 Westford 469 Westhampton 361 Westminster 696 West Newbury 250 Weston 469 Westport 160 West Roxbury 525 West
. Moses G. Cobb, and was made first sergeant on the night of his enlistment. After three years of service, he was made fourth lieutenant and later received command of the battery. During his term of command he made this battery famous for its efficiency and perfect organization. I resigned from my command in 1860, said Colonel Nims in an interview some years since, and my last appearance with it, my last parade in fact, was on the occasion of the review on Boston Common by the Prince of Wales, the late King Edward, who was on a visit to America. Then came the Civil War. The battery with which Colonel Nims had been connected was among the first to volunteer and although he was not a member he rendered efficient aid in equipping and drilling the men, accompanying them as far as New York when they started on active service. Just as he took the train, a prominent official said to him, Nims, we will have six guns ready for you when you return. The organization of the 2d Massach
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. (search)
ned control of it. Two weeks after the publication of Whittier's first poem, a second, in blank verse, entitled The Deity, appeared, with an editorial Underwood's Life of Whittier, p. 396. paragraph declaring that his poetry bore the stamp of true poetic genius, which, if carefully cultivated, would rank him among the bards of his country. Other pieces followed, on such themes as The Vale of the Merrimack, The Death of Alexander, The Voice of Time, The Burial of the Princess Charlotte of Wales, To the Memory of William Penn, The Shipwreck, Paulowna, Memory, Benevolence, etc., but they are so little above mediocrity that it is not easy to see wherein Mr. Garrison so instantly discovered the stamp of genius and the presage of future distinction as a poet; and Mr. Whittier has never deemed them worth including in his collected poems. The copy of the Free Press containing his first poem was flung to the boy Whittier by the carrier or postrider, one day, while he was helping his unc
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 2: school days and early ventures (search)
wing graphic sketch, which would do credit to riper years, is a youth of only sixteen years, who we think bids fair to prove another Bernard Barton, of whose persuasion he is. His poetry bears the stamp of true poetic genius, which, if carefully cultivated, will rank him among the bards of his country. Other poems — or versified contributions — bore such a wide range of titles as The Vale of the Merrimack, The death of Alexander, The voice of time, The Burial of the Princess Charlotte of Wales, To the Memory of William Penn, The Shipwreck, Paulowna Memory, and the like; but it is impossible now to find in these the traces of genius which Garrison saw, or thought he saw; nor has their author preserved any of the above, except the first two, even in the appendix to his Riverside edition. Later, when Garrison edited The Journal of the Times at Bennington, Vt., he printed in it four poems by Whittier, and wrote of him, Our friend Whittier seems determined to elicit our best panegyr
e regiments which had served near the coast, various engagements took place, in one of which, at Kinston, N. C., the 23d Mass. (March 14, 1865), as previously stated, was involved and lost a few men. During a part of the above events a portion of the 9th Corps, under Brig.-Gen. R. B. Porter, was assigned to the Department of the Ohio, commanded by Maj.-Gen. A. E. Burnside. It included the 36th Mass. Infantry (Maj. A. A. Goodell), the 29th (Maj. Charles Chipman), the 35th (Maj. Nathaniel Wales) and the 21st (Lieut.-Col. G. P. Hawkes). They had many toilsome marches and small engagements in Kentucky, Tennessee and Mississippi, having been transferred from North Carolina and having set out from Baltimore on March 24, 1863, to take part in the advance on Jackson, Miss., and the siege of Knoxville, Tenn. In the former attack several companies of the 36th Mass. did active duty as skirmishers on June 11 before the city, their colonel being in command of the brigade; and on the evacuatio
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