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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Ancestry-birth-boyhood (search)
o died when I was sixteen years old, knew only back to his grandfather. On the other side, my father took a great interest in the subject, and in his researches, he found that there was an entailed estate in Windsor, Connecticut, belonging to the family, to which his nephew, Lawson Grant-still living — was the heir. He was so much interested in the subject that he got his nephew to empower him to act in the matter, and in 1832 or 1833, when I was a boy ten or eleven years old, he went to Windsor, proved the title beyond dispute, and perfected the claim of the owners for a consideration-three thousand dollars, I think. I remember the circumstance well, and remember, too, hearing him say on his return that he found some widows living on the property, who had little or nothing beyond their homes. From these he refused to receive any recompense. My mother's father, John Simpson, moved from Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, to Clermont County, Ohio, about the year 1819 [1817], taki
purchase arms, writes to the Governor, I am detained till this forenoon for despatches from the British minister. I learn that he has telegraphed to Halifax for a fleet to go to Washington to protect him and save the archives of their Government. I believe it. Before leaving New York, Mr. Boutwell succeeded in obtaining an order from General Wool upon the ordnance officer at the United-States Arsenal at Watertown, for four thousand stand of arms. These arms were what were known as the Windsor rifle, and had the sword bayonet. Upon the receipt of Mr. Boutwell's telegram to forward provisions to General Butler at Annapolis by armed steamer, Governor Andrew consulted John M. Forbes, and put the matter in his charge. On the afternoon of the same day, he addressed the following letter to Governor Andrew:— Boston, April 25, 1861. To His Excellency Governor Andrew. Sir,—Having reference to the letter of Hon. George S. Boutwell, I beg leave to say, that, after you showed it me
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
y the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $451.64; in 1862, $2,045.27; in 1863, $2,734.01; in 1864, $4,300.00; in 1865, $2,400.00. Total amount, $11,930.92. Windsor Incorporated July 2, 1771. Population in 1860, 839; in 1865, 753. Valuation in 1860, $337,275; in 1865, $303,324. The selectmen in 1861 were James Whitmars appointed to confer with the authorities of the adjoining towns to agree upon some uniform plan of recruiting. The town voted to pay each volunteer credited to Windsor, while in the service, eight dollars a month, and to furnish him with a uniform and equipments, not to exceed in cost twenty-five dollars; also, to provide for thactice was to leave these matters with a committee, with full powers to act as they thought best for the interest of the service and the best good of the town. Windsor furnished ninety-eight men for the war, which w s a surplus of thirteen over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money
isbury 168 Tolland 320 Topsfield 246 Townsend 458 Truro 51 Tyngsborough 460 Tyringham 106 U. Upton 686 Uxbridge 687 W. Wakefield 450 Wales 321 Walpole 524 Waltham 461 Ware 359 Wareham 577 Warren 689 Warwick 288 Washington 108 Watertown 463 Wayland 466 Webster 690 Wellfleet 54 Wendell 289 Wenham 249 West Bridgewater 578 West Brookfield 695 Westborough 692 West Boylston 694 West Cambridge (Arlington) 467 Westfield 323 Westford 469 Westhampton 361 Westminster 696 West Newbury 250 Weston 469 Westport 160 West Roxbury 525 West Springfield 325 West Stockbridge 109 Weymouth 529 Whately 290 Wilbraham 327 Williamsburg 362 Williamstown 111 Wilmington 471 Winchendon 698 Winchester 473 Windsor 113 Winthrop 600 Wrentham 531 Woburn 474 Worcester 699 Worthington 364 Y. Yarmouth 55
nearly so important as this, but both Hooker and Governor Winthrop were great men, and too discreet to indulge in a controversy that would breed schism and bitterness. Some objections were raised to removing a candlestick, but the candlestick would not stay. In the course of the year 1635 began the exodus from the Charles River to the Connecticut. In June, 1636, Mr. Hooker went with most of his congregation and founded Hartford, while the congregations of Dorchester and Watertown founded Windsor and Wethersfield. The exodus from the New Town was so great that of the families dwelling there in January, 1635, not more than eleven are known to have remained until the end of 1636. But the places of those who departed were filled without delay. In the autumn of 1635, Rev. Thomas Shepard arrived from England with his congregation, and forthwith the meeting-house and the dwellings of the old company were occupied by the new. The next year saw the little colony convulsed by the relig
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Index. (search)
d Harvard Memorial Biographies, 242; refers to Helen Hunt, 244-46; honors received, 252; at Mt. Auburn, 256, 257; and Thomas Hughes, 258, 259; and Woman's Suffrage, 263, 265, 270; and Emily Dickinson, 268; and Philological Convention, 271, 272; on T. G. Appleton, 272-74; in Europe in 1872, 275-77; in Chester, 275, 276; at London, 276, 277; in Europe in 1878, 278-302; at Aldershot review, 278, 279; in London, 279-83, 286-88, 294; in France, 283-85; at Reading, 285; at Oxford, 286, 290-92; at Windsor, 288; in Scotland, 293, 294; in Normandy, 297-99; in Germany, 300, 301; in Switzerland, 301,302; in Europe in 1897, 303, 304; in England, 303; in London, 303; in Paris, 303; in Scotland, 304; in Europe in 1901, 304-20; in Tangier, 304-08; in Granada, 308, 309; in Italy, 309-16; in Venice, 314-16; in the Tyrol, 316-18; in English Lake region, 319, 320; returns to Cambridge to live, 321; effects of Civil War, 322, 323; and Matthew Arnold, 323, 324; and Cleveland campaign, 324, 325; at home of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
Peregrine Bingham, author of Treatise on the Law of Infancy and Coverture. He invited Sumner to dine in Dec., 1838, at 34 Mecklenburgh Square; and on another occasion when Charles Austin was to be his guest. the reporter,—a most able man, and friend of Jeremy Bentham,—to meet Austin and some of the philosophical Radicals; to-morrow with Talbot, John Chetwynd Talbot, 1806-1852. He married a daughter of Lord Wharncliffe, and was Attorney-General to the Prince of Wales, and Recorder of Windsor. the son of Earl Talbot, to meet undoubtedly a Tory party; next day (being Sunday) to breakfast and pass the day with Roebuck, and to dine with Leader, the member for Westminster, to meet Lord Brougham and Roebuck; the next to dine with Sir Robert Inglis, the most distinguished Tory now in town; then with Sir Gregory Lewin; then with Cresswell, Theobald, Warren (Diary of a Physician), &c. I cannot content myself by a bare allusion to my dinner at Guildhall and to my day at Windsor. I was i
also owned the opposite corner, south of Winthrop Street. He was a Deputy in the General Court, 3 Mar. 1635-6, removed to Connecticut with Hooker, and settled at Windsor, where he d. 1670, having had children, John, Thomas, and Mary. Mr. Allen sustained a high rank among his fellow colonists; held several town offices, and served House, having sold the homestead, in 1794, to the Corporation of Harvard College. In 1805 he erected the house now standing at the S. W. corner of Hampshire and Windsor streets, where he subsequently resided. When the great speculations in land commenced, about 1802, he sold large portions of his estate, united with others in la chil. were Hannah, b. 22 July 1745, m. John Haskell of Hardwick, and d. 4 Sept. 1831; Millecent, b. 20 Jan. 1747, m. Denison Robinson of Hardwick, and d. at Windsor, Mass., 5 July 1798; Robert, b. 2 Oct 1748, a physician in Amherst, m. wid. Esther Guernsey, and d. 10 Mar. 1835; Prudence, b. 18 Feb. 1750, m. Joshua Clark, and d.
state at the westerly corner of Dunster Street and Harvard Square. Alexander, John, by w. Beatrix, or Beatrice, had Martha, b. 16 July 1668 ; Deliverance, b. 17 Jan. 1671; and Elizabeth, b. 16 Sept. 1674. Allen, Matthew, was here in 1632, and in 1635 he owned the estate at the N. W. corner of Winthrop and Dunster streets. He also owned the opposite corner, south of Winthrop Street. He was a Deputy in the General Court, 3 Mar. 1635-6, removed to Connecticut with Hooker, and settled at Windsor, where he d. 1670, having had children, John, Thomas, and Mary. Mr. Allen sustained a high rank among his fellow colonists; held several town offices, and served as Juror, Deputy, Magistrate, and Assistant, in the Colony government. He was also appointed by the Colony, in 1660 and 1664, one of the Commissioners of the United Colonies,-an office fully equal in dignity and importance to that of Senator in the Congress of the United States. Hinman and Hazard. Ames, Joanna, was buried 23 De
by the marsh, southerly by School Street and westerly by a line passing through the centre of the Brick Meeting-house lot, nearly parallel with Columbia Street. About 1782 he removed to Tewksbury, but returned about 1796, and resided several years in the house on Plymouth Street, recently destroyed, familiarly known as the Cholera House, having sold the homestead, in 1794, to the Corporation of Harvard College. In 1805 he erected the house now standing at the S. W. corner of Hampshire and Windsor streets, where he subsequently resided. When the great speculations in land commenced, about 1802, he sold large portions of his estate, united with others in laying out streets for a great city, and gave to the Town the school-house lot at the corner of Windsor and School streets, and to the proprietors of the Brick Meeting-house the easterly half of the square on which that house stood. He was Town Clerk, 1769-1780, and Town Treasurer, 1777, 1778. It is remarkable, that the office of T
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