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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Vicksburg during the siege. (search)
of contention in all the subsequent discussions on the responsibility of failure. It directed the latter to come up, if practicable, on the rear of McPherson at Clinton at once. All the strength you can quickly assemble should be brought. Time is all important. This was put into Pemberton's hands at 7 o'clock on the morning of generals sent sustained the execution of the order; others said nay. General Pemberton concluded that he would obey the order in this wise: he would set off for Clinton, which was twelve miles east, by moving on Dillon's, which was eight miles south. By this route he might break the communications of the enemy, and force them to attack. If his luck was good, he might proceed to Clinton, or else take advantage of any improved posture of affairs that the movement might bring about. On the morning of the 15th, the three divisions set out on their march, being compelled to make a tedious detour because of the destruction by flood of a bridge over Baker's cr
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Movement against Jackson-fall of Jackson-Intercepting the enemy-battle of Champion's Hill (search)
ones. McPherson was ordered at daylight to move on Clinton, ten miles from Jackson; Sherman was notified of myase a union became necessary. McPherson reached Clinton with the advance early on the 13th and immediately dvantageous one in any event. With one division at Clinton he was in position to reinforce McPherson, at Jackseneral Sherman is between us with four divisions at Clinton. It is important to establish communication, that amp; Crocker bivouacked just in Hovey's rear on the Clinton road. Sherman with two divisions, was in Jackson, es and military factories. I rode in person out to Clinton. On my arrival I ordered McClernand to move early s superior, which I have shown were to attack us at Clinton. This, indeed, I knew he could not do; but I felt 16th a repetition of his order to join Johnston at Clinton, he concluded to obey, and sent a dispatch to his c's trains occupying the roads. I was still back at Clinton. McPherson sent me word of the situation, and expr
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 27 (search)
on. D. M. Lewis, Sparta, Ga., writes that he will cut his wheat on the 28th (to-morrow), and both for quality and quantity he never saw it equaled. They have new flour in Alabama; and everywhere South the crops are unprecedented in amount. To-morrow is election day. For Congress, Col. Wickham, who voted against secession, opposes Mr. Lyons. But he has fought since! We have a letter from Gen. Jos. E. Johnston, dated at Calhoun, Miss., 16th inst. He says the enemy on the railroad at Clinton numbered 25,000. We got our baggage out of Jackson before it was abandoned. Pemberton marched to Edward's Station with 17,000 men. Gen. Johnston himself had 7500, and some 15,000 more were on the way to him. We had 3000 at Port Hudsonbeing over 40,000 which he meant to concentrate immediately. I think Vicksburg ought to be safe. Our government has been notified that, if we execute the two officers (selected by lot) in retaliation for the execution of two of our officers in Kentucky,
patch to General Pemberton, which was received on the 14th: I have lately arrived, and learn that Major-General Sherman is between us with four divisions at Clinton. It is important to reestablish communications, that you may be reinforced, if practicable. I come up on his rear at once. To beat such a detachment would be o At this point your nearest communication would be through Raymond. The movement commenced at I P. M. on the 15th. General Pemberton states that the force at Clinton was an army corps, numerically greater than his whole available force in the field; that the enemy had at least an equal force to the south, on my right flank, why move to that point with about six thousand. Pemberton reversed his column to return to Edward's Depot and take the Brownsville road, so as to proceed toward Clinton, on the north side of the railroad, and sent a reply to General Johnston to notify him of the retrograde movement. Just as the reverse movement commenced, the en
rr's and Hovey's divisions marched through Raymond in a heavy rain-storm — the former to Forest Hill Church, within six miles of General Sherman's position, at Jackson — the latter to a creek within four miles of General McPherson's position, at Clinton. This was the most fatiguing and exhausting day's march that had been made. That night I received a despatch from Major-General Grant, informing me that the enemy had retreated from Jackson, and was probably attempting to reach Vicksburgh inivisions, and by nine and a half o'clock on the fifteenth, General Osterhaus's division had seized Bolton Station, capturing several prisoners, and driving the balance of the enemy's picket away. General Hovey's division soon after came up from Clinton, and both divisions were disposed to meet any attack that might come from the enemy known to be in front. During the day an active reconnoissance was pushed by Colonel Mudd, chief of cavalry of my corps, up to the enemy's picket-line, and at so
inate than there seemed reason to expect. The enemy marched out the bulk of his force on the Clinton road, and engaged McPherson's corps about two and a half miles from the city. A small force of move. McPherson was ordered to retrace his steps early in the morning of the fifteenth on the Clinton road. Sherman was left in Jackson to destroy the railroads, bridges, factories, work-shops, arhich had moved that day on the same road to within one and a half miles of Bolton. On reaching Clinton, at forty-five minutes past four P. M., I ordered McClernand to move his command early the nextnamely, May fourteenth, pushed on to Jackson by the lower road, McPherson's corps following the Clinton road. We communicated during the night, so as to arrive at Jackson about the same hour. Durf the town. On the morning of the sixteenth I received a note from General Grant, written at Clinton, reporting the enemy advancing from Edward's Depot, and ordering me to put in motion one of my
Mississippi River, move through Louisiana and Arkansas. Accordingly, after resting about two hours, we started south-west on the Liberty road, marched about fifteen miles, and halted until daylight on the plantation of Dr. Spurlark. The next morning we left the road and threatened Magnolia and Osyka, where large forces were concentrated to meet us; but instead of attacking those points, took a course due south, marching through woods, lanes, and byroads, and striking the road leading from Clinton to Osyka. Scarcely had we touched this read when we came upon the Ninth Tennessee cavalry, posted in a strong defile, guarding the bridges over Tickfaw River. We captured their pickets, and attacking, drove them before us, killing, wounding, and capturing a number. Our loss in this engagement was one man killed, and Lieutenant-Colonel William D. Blackburn and four men wounded. I cannot speak too highly of the bravery of the men upon this occasion, and particularly of Lieutenant-Colonel
) a despatch informing him of my arrival, and of the occupation of Clinton by a portion of Grant's.army, urging the importance of reestablish that it was McPherson's corps (four divisions) which marched from Clinton. I have no certain information of the other: both skirmished verye. This road runs nearly parallel with the railroad. In going to Clinton we shall leave Bolton's Depot four miles to the right. I am thus e receipt of your instructions to move and attack the enemy toward Clinton. I deemed the movement very hazardous, preferring to remain in poo believe that Sherman, who advanced in heavy order of battle from Clinton, could not besiege, but would be compelled to make an immediate aseavy cannonade from the batteries near the Canton and south of the Clinton roads. The missiles reached all parts of the town. An assault, tnth, when I learned that there were four divisions of the enemy at Clinton, distant twenty miles from the main body of General Pemberton's fo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
quarters at Bovina, 8 miles from that place; that the Seventeenth Corps (McPherson's) had moved that day from Raymond to Clinton, 9 or 10 miles from Jackson, on the road to Vicksburg. He added that General Maxey's brigade from Port Hudson was expecn order in writing was sent without delay to General Pemberton by Captain Yerger, who volunteered to bear it, to move to Clinton at once and attack a Federal. corps there, the troops in Jackson to cooperate; to beat that detachment and establish coouncil of war, which he informed of that intention, and consulted upon the measure to be substituted for the movement to Clinton. It was decided to move southward to a point on the road by which General Grant's forces had advanced, which would haveo measures in consequence. Soon after sunrise on the 16th he received an order from me, the second one, to march toward Clinton that our forces might be united. He made preparations to obey it, and, in acknowledging it, described the route he inte
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
ones. McPherson was ordered at daylight to move on Clinton, ten miles from Jackson. Sherman was notified of mcase a union became necessary. McPherson reached Clinton with the advance early on the 13th, and immediatelyvantageous one, in any event. With one division at Clinton, he was in position to reenforce McPherson at Jackseneral Sherman is between us with four divisions at Clinton. It is important to establish communication, that mp. Crocker bivouacked just in Hovey's rear on the Clinton road. Sherman, with two divisions, was in Jackson,s, and military factories. I rode in person out to Clinton. On my arrival I ordered McClernand to move early s superior, which I have shown were to attack us at Clinton. This, indeed, I knew he could not do, but I felt 16th a repetition of his order to join Johnston at Clinton, he concluded to obey, and sent a dispatch to his c's trains occupying the roads. I was still back at Clinton. McPherson sent me word of the situation and expre
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