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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 6 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Decatur (Mississippi, United States) or search for Decatur (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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of passenger and freight-cars, beside a train which he had taken, with 159 prisoners, two hours before. Thus provided, he had uncontested possession of 100 miles of the Memphis and Charleston road before night, or from Stevenson on the east to Decatur on the west; seizing five more locomotives at Stevenson, and pushing on so far west as Tuseumbia, whence he sent an expedition so far south as Russelville, Ala., capturing and appropriating Confederate property on all hands, without the loss of of 72 killed and wounded, 350 prisoners, and 2 guns; while his own loss was inconsiderable. He was soon compelled, by the gathering of Rebel forces around him, to abandon Tuscumbia and all south of the Tennessee, burning the railroad bridges at Decatur and Bridgeport, but holding firmly and peaceably all of Alabama north of that river. Had he been even moderately reenforced, he would have struck and probably could have destroyed the great Rebel armories and founderies in Georgia, or have capt
force in the States bordering on the Mississippi being now mainly engaged in the defense of Vicksburg and the Yazoo valley, Grant had determined to retaliate one of the destructive cavalry raids of Morgan, Forrest, and Van Dorn. To this end, Col. B. H. Grierson, with a cavalry brigade, 1,700 strong, composed of the 6th and 7th Illinois and 2d Iowa, starting April 17. Lagrange, Tennessee, swept rapidly southward, through Ripley, New Albany, Pontotoc, Clear Spring, Starkville, Louisville, Decatur, and Newton, Miss.--thus passing behind all the Rebel forces confronting and resisting Grant — until, having passed Jackson, he turned sharply to the right, and made his way W. S.W. through Raleigh, Westville, Hazlehurst, and Gallatin, to Union C. H., back of Natchez; thence zigzagging by Bogue Chito to Greensburg and Clinton, La., and so to Baton Rouge; May 2. having traversed more than 600 miles of hostile territory in 16 days; crossing several considerable rivers by ferriage, burning
misled ; and, when the pursuit was actually commenced, the scent was too cold. Grierson followed to Holly Springs, and then desisted; Forrest getting safely away with more men and better horses than he led into Tennessee. Gen. Sherman, with four divisions of Hurlbut's and McPherson's corps, and a brigade of cavalry under Winslow, low, moved Feb. 3, 1864. eastward from Vicksburg through Jackson, crossing Pearl river on pontoons, and advancing through Brandon, Morton, Hillsboroa, and Decatur, across the Octibbeha and Tallahaha, to Meridian Feb. 14-16.--a railroad junction on the eastern border of the State--destroying a vast amount of railroad property, bridges, trestles, track, locomotives, cars, &c., &c. Lt.-Gen. Polk, with French's and Loring's divisions and Lee's cavalry, fell back before our army ; skirmishing occasionally, but making no serious resistance; retreating at last behind the Tombigbee. Yet the expedition, though scarcely resisted, and doing vast damage to