hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 100 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 18 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 14 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 8 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 329 results in 44 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Vicksburg during the siege. (search)
ackson by Pemberton, whose headquarters were at Edwards' Depot. On the 30th of April, General Sherman, commant; but the Thirteenth shortly turned off toward Edwards' Depot; while the Seventeenth, followed by the Fifteennemy is apparently moving in heavy force toward Edwards' Depot, on Southern Railroad. The movable army of Pems of Forney and M. L. Smith in loco, was now at Edwards' Depot, eighteen miles east of Vicksburg; and headquaover Baker's creek, which runs a little east of Edwards' Depot, in a southwesterly course, to the Big Black rromptly entered. McClernand, who had been near Edwards' Depot, having received orders to that effect, joined o march to Bolton's Depot, eight miles east of Edwards' Depot. Returning to Edwards' Depot, General PembertoEdwards' Depot, General Pemberton formed his line of battle-remaining, General Johnston contends, for five hours in front of a single Federal iate orders than did General Loring from his at Edwards' Depot, an act of independence for which General Johns
comply at once with your order. On the same day General Pemberton, after his arrival at Edward's Depot, called a council of war of all the general officers present. He placed General Johnston's General Johnston. General Pemberton then sent the following despatch to General Johnston: Edward's Depot, May 14, 1863. I shall move as early to-morrow morning as practicable, with a column of s situated on the main road leading from Raymond to Port Gibson, seven and a half miles from Edward's Depot. The object is to cut the enemy's communications and to force him to attack me, as I do notpositive information that he was daily increasing his strength. I also learned, on reaching Edward's Depot, that one division of the enemy (A. J. Smith's) was at or near Dillon's. On the morning oy move to that point with about six thousand. Pemberton reversed his column to return to Edward's Depot and take the Brownsville road, so as to proceed toward Clinton, on the north side of the rai
nd a half miles of Bolton. On reaching Clinton, at forty-five minutes past four P. M., I ordered McClernand to move his command early the next morning toward Edward's Depot, marching so as to feel the enemy, if he encountered him, but not to bring on a general engagement unless he was confident he was able to defeat him; and alsonemy's cavalry disappear over the hill. General Grant in person was with my column at the time, and ordered me to camp there one division (Steele's) on the Edward's Depot road, aud the other (Tuttle's) toward Raymond. Whilst there we heard that the enemy had met General McPherson near Raymond, and was defeated. Next morningled in the stores of the town. On the morning of the sixteenth I received a note from General Grant, written at Clinton, reporting the enemy advancing from Edward's Depot, and ordering me to put in motion one of my divisions toward Bolton, and to follow with the other as soon as I had completed the work of destruction ordered.
south of the Big Black, apparently toward Edwards's Depot, which will be the battle-field, if I canfive thousand) and of Vicksburgh, were at Edwards's Depot — the General's headquarters at Bovina; tnton, ten miles west of Jackson, between Edwards's Depot and ourselves. I was aware that reenforced a letter from General Pemberton, dated Edwards's Depot, May fourteenth, (Thursday,) five forty Pur march will be on the road leading from Edwards's Depot, in the direction of Brownsville. This rat once with my whole available force from Edwards' Depot. In directing this move I do not think yor Baker's Creek, three or four miles from Edwards's Depot, and of his having been compelled to withr eight miles east of the Big Black, near Edwards's Depot. On May nineteenth, General Pemberton'dvance beyond (east of) the Big Black, to Edwards's Depot. After the receipt of the order in violaCreek was fought three or four miles from Edwards's Depot. The presence of the enemy was reported [2 more...]
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 6 (search)
ver, finding his position turned, he abandoned it, after spiking his guns and blowing up his magazine, and marched to Hankinson's Ferry, to cross the Big Black there. General Loring, coming to his assistance with a division from Jackson, by Edwards's Depot, sent a detachment to hold Grindstone Ford, and turned to join him at the ferry. All their troops crossed the river that day unmolested, and rejoined General Pemberton. To divert General Pemberton's attention from his real design, Gener where they waited for Sherman's troops until the 8th. The army then moved forward on two parallel roads, the Thirteenth on one, the Seventeenth on the other, abreast, the Fifteenth following on both; the Thirteenth turned into the road to Edwards's Depot, however, while the Seventeenth kept that to Jackson, followed at an interval of a few miles by the Thirteenth. On the 5th, as Lieutenant-General Pemberton's dispatches subsequent to that of the 1st had contained no reference to the move
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
s apparently moving in heavy force toward Edwards's Depot, on Southern Railroad. McClernand's ThirGeneral Pemberton's active forces were at Edwards's Depot, and his headquarters at Bovina; that McP General Grant's army was to the south of Edwards's Depot, I inferred that McPherson's corps had beral Pemberton, dated four miles south of Edwards's Depot, eight o'clock A. M., May 16th, saying thd been ordered peremptorily to march from Edwards's Depot to attack him in rear. He determined, thode to the camp of his army just south of Edwards's Depot, and convened a council of war, composed ed on the road leading from Livingston to Edwards's Depot. Supposing that the Army of Mississippi to give battle to the enemy, and expected Edwards's Depot to be the battle-field. Early on the enridge's, with the floating-bridge, near Edwards's Depot. The cavalry, under General W. H. Jacksoned to move on the morning of the 5th, by Edwards's Depot, to the south of the road-thinking, from [1 more...]
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
Grant's report. when it was between Fourteen-mile Creek and his camp, near Edwards's Depot, and Sherman's and McPherson's corps were at and near Raymond. On all thoe Federal army had passed to the east of General Pemberton's position near Edwards's Depot, and, consequently, that that army must defeat General Pemberton's before free to return to the chosen ground See first supplemental report. near Edwards's Depot, on which his matured plans were to have been executed. His army could haieutenant-General Pemberton's startling disclosure, that his movement from Edwards's Depot See General Pemberton's report, p. 44. in violation of my orders, and inh a force as that which Lieutenant-General Pemberton afterward placed near Edwards's Depot, used for this object, and directed with vigor, would have had all reasonailes from Livingston, and retired rapidly toward Vicksburg by Bolton's and Edwards's Depots. Soon after the middle of the month, Major-General Lee arrived at the
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
apparently moving his heavy force toward Edwards's Depot, on Southern Railroad. With my limited ctive operations. The command arrived at Edwards's Depot on the 13th, and was placed in position, patch was addressed to General Johnston: Edwards's Depot, May 14, 1863. I shall move as early ood, for the purpose of returning toward Edwards's Depot to take the Brownsville road, and then tohat the advance movement of the army from Edwards's Depot, on the afternoon of the 15th of May, wastention to make any forward movement from Edwards's Depot, but to have there awaited an attack fromenemy, should he attack me in position at Edwards's Depot. To await and draw on this attack I had t, and, as soon as possible, proceeded to Edwards's Depot, where I arrived at about twelve o'clock,cksburg), I had swelled my little army at Edwards's Depot to seventeen thousand five hundred (it mudetermined to advance from my position at Edwards's Depot, and thus abandon the line of the Big Bla[21 more...]
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 14 (search)
he next day on the Clinton road to make junction with McClernand, and I was ordered to remain one day to break up railroads, to destroy the arsenal, a foundery, the cotton-factory of the Messrs. Green, etc., etc., and then to follow McPherson. McPherson left Jackson early on the 15th, and General Grant during the same day. I kept my troops busy in tearing up railroad-tracks, etc., but early on the morning of the 16th received notice from General Grant that a battle was imminent near Edwards's Depot; that he wanted me to dispatch one of my divisions immediately, and to follow with the other as soon as I had completed the work of destruction. Steele's division started immediately, and later in the day I followed with the other division (Tuttle's). Just as I was leaving Jackson, a very fat man came to see me, to inquire if his hotel, a large, frame-building near the depot, were doomed to be burned. I told him we had no intention to burn it, or any other house, except the machine-sh
two pioneer corps, and making a force of less than twenty thousand fighting men. I am thus particular in giving numbers, since our force has been everywhere overstated, and if any credit is due for what was accomplished, or blame ascribed for shortcomings, let praise or blame be awarded understandingly. A brief diary of events, marches, etc., will convey some idea of our trip. February third, marched seventeen miles, crossing the Big Black at the old railroad bridge, and camped near Edwards's Depot. Weather fine and troops in good condition. General Hurlbut is crossing Big Black at Messenger, on the old Jackson road, six miles above our crossing. February fourth, marched fourteen miles and camped beyond Champion Hills. Some skirmishing with the enemy. February fifth, marched to-day fifteen miles, and camped two miles west of Jackson. Had sharp skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry, losing some seven men killed, thirty wounded, and thirteen prisoners. The enemy's loss was
1 2 3 4 5