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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 109 45 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 82 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 81 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 66 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 58 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 50 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 42 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.35 (search)
nder General Pope, at Farmington, which withdrew without giving serious battle. On May 30, Beauregard completed in a masterly manner his evacuation of Corinth. We marched always ready for battle, but were never attacked nor closely followed. We marched about twelve miles per day 'till we reached Tupelo, where Beauregard halted the army in order of battle, and remained unmolested 'till August, when Bragg moved his army to Chattanooga, and Price, in September, moved the Army of the West to Iuka. The author overestimates the Confederate army at Chickamauga. General Bragg stated his loss in killed and wounded at 18,000 men, and as two-fifths of his whole army, which was less than 50,000 of all arms. Bragg had no reserves, but fought his whole army, including Forest's cavalry, which, to the number of about 6,000, fought on foot. The battle of Chickamauga was the fiercest of the war. Rosecranz fought stubbornly, as he always did, and Thomas no where more signally evinced his be
n Railroad, so important on account of its extension through Eastern Tennessee and Virginia, must be properly guarded from Iuka to Tuscumbia, and even to Decatur, if practicable. Columbus must either be left to be defended to the last extremity bcommanding) is moving by cars to-day (20th March), and Statham's brigade (Crittenden's division). The brigade will halt at Iuka, the regiment at Burnsville; Cleburne's brigade, Hardee's division, except regiment, at Burnsville; and Carroll's brigade,byville, ordered on. To-morrow, Breckinridge's brigade will go to Corinth; then Bowen's. When these pass Tuscumbia and Iuka, transportation will be ready there for the other troops to follow immediately from those points, and, if necessary, from y. Jefferson Davis. On the 25th of March General Johnston completed the concentration of his troops. On that day he wrote to the President from Corinth, My force is now united, holding Burnsville, Iuka, and Tuscumbia, with one division here.
, April 30, 1862101,051 note.-Owing to the absence of returns of a uniform date, the above figures have been taken from such returns as are on file bearing date nearest to the time desired. Distances. By Land.Miles. From Corinth to Iuka. 23 From Corinth to Burnsville.10 From Corinth to Chewalla11 1/2 From Corinth to Bethel23 From Corinth to Purdy22 From Corinth to Eastport30 From Corinth to Wynn's Landing21 From Corinth to Farmington5 From Corinth to Hamburg19 From Corinth to Monterey11 From Corinth to Pittsburg23 From Corinth to Savannah30 Iuka to Eastport8 Burnsville to Wynn's15 Bethel to Purdy4 Bethel to Savannah23 Monterey to Purdy15 Monterey to Farmington9 On Tennessee River going down.Miles. From Chickasaw to Bear Creek1 From Bear Creek to Eastport1 From Eastport to Cook's Landing1 From Cook's Landing to Indian Creek21 From Indian Creek to Cook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From
e to the two strategic points, Chamberlain and Corinth (according to the map). Having brigades of observation at Purdy and Iuka, the two points threatened by the enemy from the Tennessee River, I also addressed you a letter on the same subject througn that way, we would be certain not to march on Crump's Landing or Pittsburg, when, perhaps, we ought to move on or toward Iuka or Eastport. The great desideratum is to be thoroughly prepared wheresoever and whenever required, on positive informatiowill form a garrison for the post and depot of Corinth. VI.-Strong guards will be left at the railroad-bridges between Iuka and Corinth, to be furnished in due proportions from the commands at Iuka, Burnsville, and Corinth. VII.-Proper guardsIuka, Burnsville, and Corinth. VII.-Proper guards will be left at the camps of the several regiments of the forces in the field; corps commanders will determine the strength of these guards. VIII.-Wharton's regiment of Texas Cavalry will be ordered forward at once, to scout on the road from Mon
n the march to form a junction of his forces with mine, was called on to send at least a brigade by railroad, so that we might fall on and crush the enemy should he attempt to advance from under his gunboats. The call on General Johnston was promptly complied with. His entire force was also hastened in this direction; and by the first of April our united forces were concentrated along the Mobile & Ohio Railroad from Bethel to Corinth, and on the Memphis & Charleston Railroad from Corinth to Iuka. It was then determined to assume the offensive, and strike a sudden blow at the enemy in position, under General Grant, on the west bank of the Tennessee, at Pittsburg, and in the direction of Savannah, before he was reinforced by the army under General Buell, then known to be advancing for that purpose by rapid marches from Nashville and Columbia. About the same time General Johnston was advised that such an operation conformed to the expectations of the President. By a rapid and v
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
and virtually neutralize the two Confederate armies,--my sole force left available for the protection of that important railway, exclusive of General Polk's forces at Columbus and elsewhere, would be but 2500 men under Chalmers, in the quarter of Iuka, with 3000 men recently arrived at Corinth from New Orleans, under Ruggles. With a view to avoiding such a catastrophe as the enforced permanent separation of our two armies, I urged General Johnston, about the 22d of February, to abandon his , and, as second in command, to supervise the task of organization. By the 27th of March the last of General Hardee's corps reached the vicinity of Corinth,--about 8000 men,--while Crittenden's division of 5000 men was halted at Burnsville and Iuka, eastward of Corinth. The order of organization, signed by General Johnston, was published on the 29th of March. Based on my notes, it had been drawn up by Colonel Jordan, and subdivided the armies of Kentucky and Mississippi, now united, into t
gallant fight, that had but one serious resulthe was forced to withdraw. That result was the loss of the ram Arkansas--which went down to co-operate with this movement. Her machinery became deranged, and there was only the choice of surrendering her to the enemy, or of sending her the road that every Confederate iron-clad went sooner, or later-and she was blown up. But the gloom was only to grow deeper and deeper, with thickening clouds and fewer gleams of light. After the fight at Iuka, in which that popular darling had been defeated and forced to fall back before superior numbers, Price had combined his army with that of Van Dorn; and on the 3d of October, the latter led them to another wild and Quixotic slaughteringstand-ing out among the deeds even of that stirring time, in bold relief for brilliant, terrible daring, and fearful slaughter-but hideous in its waste of life for reckless and ill-considered objects. The forces of the enemy at Corinth were in almost impregnab
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance of Van Dorn and Price-Price enters Iuka --battle of Iuka (search)
Advance of Van Dorn and Price-Price enters Iuka --battle of Iuka At this time, September 4th, I3th of September General Sterling Price entered Iuka, a town about twenty miles east of Corinth on osecrans had previously had his headquarters at Iuka, where his command was spread out along the Mem a point on the road about seven miles west of Iuka. From there his troops were to march by the noforce moved on the Fulton road which comes into Iuka further east. This plan was suggested by Rosec It looked to me that, if Price would remain in Iuka until we could get there, his annihilation was f Van Dorn had moved against Corinth instead of Iuka I could have thrown in reinforcements to the nuer midnight from Jacinto, twenty-two miles from Iuka, saying that some of his command had been delays Corners], the point where the Jacinto road to Iuka leaves the road going east. He here turned nor was soon brought to me that our troops were in Iuka. I immediately rode into town and found that t[2 more...]
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The campaign against Vicksburg-Employing the freedmen-occupation of Holly Springs-Sherman ordered to Memphis-Sherman's movements down the Mississippi-Van Dorn captures Holly Springs-collecting forage and food (search)
er than all the others attacked by him put together. Murphy was also warned of Van Dorn's approach, but made no preparations to meet him. He did not even notify his command. Colonel Murphy was the officer who, two months before, had evacuated Iuka on the approach of the enemy. General Rosecrans denounced him for the act and desired to have him tried and punished. I sustained the colonel at the time because his command was a small one compared with that of the enemy — not one-tenth as largice's possession I looked upon as an oversight and excused it on the ground of inexperience in military matters. He should, however, have destroyed them. This last surrender demonstrated to my mind that Rosecrans' judgment of Murphy's conduct at Iuka was correct. The surrender of Holly Springs was most reprehensible and showed either the disloyalty of Colonel Murphy to the cause which he professed to serve, or gross cowardice. After the war was over I read from the diary of a lady who acc
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Condition of the Army-rebuilding the Railroad- General Burnside's situation-orders for battle-plans for the attack-hooker's position- Sherman's movements (search)
pi. Knowing the difficulty Sherman would have to supply himself from Memphis, I had previously ordered supplies sent from St. Louis on small steamers, to be convoyed by the navy, to meet him at Eastport. These he got. I now ordered him to discontinue his work of repairing roads and to move on with his whole force to Stevenson, Alabama, without delay. This order was borne to Sherman by a messenger, who paddled down the Tennessee in a canoe and floated over Muscle Shoals; it was delivered at Iuka on the 27th. In this Sherman was notified that the rebels were moving a force towards Cleveland, East Tennessee, and might be going to Nashville, in which event his troops were in the best position to beat them there. Sherman, with his characteristic promptness, abandoned the work he was engaged upon and pushed on at once. On the 1st of November he crossed the Tennessee at Eastport, and that day was in Florence, Alabama, with the head of column, while his troops were still crossing at East
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