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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 109 45 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 82 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 81 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 66 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 58 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 50 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 42 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Iuka (Mississippi, United States) or search for Iuka (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 2 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
erates. Price learned as soon as he got into Iuka that though Rosecrans had sent three divisions bout 6500 men was advanced to within 6 miles of Iuka and directed to be ready to attack the next mor. by C. S. Hamilton, Major-General, U. S. V. Iuka is a little village on the Memphis and Charlest Iuka. A regiment of Union troops stationed at Iuka evacuated the place, leaving a considerable quaile Ord, with a similar column, was to approach Iuka from the west. This he did, taking position wiere he was to await Rosecrans's attack. From Iuka southward ran two parallel roads, some two milefield of Corinth. The opposing forces at Iuka, Miss. September 19th, 1862. The composition, lat 5 A. M., with 9000 men, on Price's forces at Iuka. After a march of 18 miles attacked them at 4:t 8000 men, was marching from Corinth direct on Iuka, and was within four or five miles of the battlds. This was before the battle of Iuka. After Iuka I was ordered to command the district, and Gene[24 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
r Guntown and Baldwyn, Miss., with 15,000 to 20,000 men, moved up to Iuka about the 12th of September, intending to follow me; and, as he repos had not crossed the Tennessee River, he concluded to withdraw from Iuka toward my [his] old encampment. His withdrawal was after the hot bais concentration, following the precipitate withdrawal of Price from Iuka, portended mischief to the Union forces in west Tennessee, numberingct occupying the vicinity of the Memphis and Charleston railway from Iuka to Memphis, a stretch of about a hundred and fifteen miles, and locaemphis eastward toward Corinth, whence it extends eastwardly through Iuka, crosses Bear River and follows the Tuscumbia Valley on the south siude the college grounds. This was before the battle of Iuka. After Iuka I was ordered to command the district, and General Grant moved his hll seemed to be about ended when a heavy fire from fresh troops from Iuka, Burnsville, and Rienzi, who had succeeded in reaching Corinth, pour