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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 109 45 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 82 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 81 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 66 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 58 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 50 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 42 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Iuka (Mississippi, United States) or search for Iuka (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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He left at midnight on the twenty-eighth. with nine hundred chosen horsemen, splendidly equipped for fighting or running. The two battalions were composed of the Second Michigan and Second Iowa. His first point, by a very circuitous route, was Iuka — a beautiful town, looking like a New-England village, containing one thousand inhabitants, and is a resort for invalids, on account of its splendid chalybeate springs. From Iuka he crossed to Eastport and Fulton, thence by the Tuscumbia and JacIuka he crossed to Eastport and Fulton, thence by the Tuscumbia and Jacinto road to Cartersville, to Padens, and from there struck the head-waters of the Tombigbee River, and crossed to Boonville, on the Mobile Railroad. His movements were made with such boldness and celerity, that they were supposed by the people to be rebel cavalry. Upon approaching the place, a large train of cars containing three thousand infantry were on the track. The Colonel wisely kept in the bushes until they moved off — only sent his men above and clipped the telegraph-wires, that tell
ediately in readiness and proceed, provided with three days cooked rations for the men and one day's for the animals, with as much secrecy as possible, from his camp in the vicinity of Farmington, across the Memphis and Charleston Railroad east of Iuka, to the head-waters of the Tombigbee, thence to bear north of west so as to strike the Mobile and Ohio Railroad at some point near Booneville, and destroy the track in the most effective possible manner, so as to prevent the passage of trains at lhe met and forcing them to show him the way, their persons being sufficient guarantee that they would act in good faith. The brigade crossed the Mobile and Ohio Railroad with daylight on the morning of the twenty-eighth, some two miles east of Iuka, and twenty miles from Farmington, and pushed ten miles further to the south, when they rested. Late in the afternoon the march was resumed, and continued until daybreak the next day, for a distance of nearly forty miles, to the head-waters of th
. Official report of General Grant. Iuka, Miss., September 20, 1862. To Major-General Halleeve they have any superiors. In our advance on Iuka, and during the action, they ably performed thele of my experience on the late battle-field at Iuka. It had been known as early as the tenth day from Grant (who was then only seven miles from Iuka) to the effect that he (Grant) was waiting for After the evacuation seven guns were found in Iuka, which the rebels had abandoned; among them werearly morning, and that his rear-guard had left Iuka but a few moments previous. Without the leasadvance of Gens. Grant and Ord's column reached Iuka, and halted in the town. Had they been but a f Cooper: I wrote you a short communication from IuKa, announcing its peaceable capture on the fourth digressing. We held peaceable possession of Iuka one day, and on the next day were alarmed by thto Corinth, but as soon as Price retreated from Iuka, Gen. Ord was sent to Corinth by Grant, and Van[19 more...]
the nineteenth instant, to attack the enemy at Iuka. One half-mile west of Barnett's, the advancedle of my experience on the late battle-field at Iuka. It had been known as early as the tenth dayfollowing morning at four o'clock A. M., toward Iuka, where Price had concentrated his forces. At tickets of the enemy about seven miles south of Iuka. As the pickets were driven in we advanced. Aon the twelfth, we silently wended our way from Iuka, leaving the destinies of the town in the hands Rosecrans became aware that Price had occupied Iuka in force, and was endeavoring to cross the Tenn from Grant (who was then only seven miles from Iuka) to the effect that he (Grant) was waiting for rdingly moved forward until within two miles of Iuka, when the enemy were discovered posted on a broearly morning, and that his rear-guard had left Iuka but a few moments previous. Without the leas Cooper: I wrote you a short communication from IuKa, announcing its peaceable capture on the fourth[12 more...]
rmation of the Major-General commanding the District, the following report of the battle of Corinth: preliminaries. The rumors which followed the battles of Iuka were that Price had marched to the vicinity of Ripley, and was being joined by Van Dorn with all the available rebel forces in North-Mississippi for the purpose ofress Creek. To be prepared for eventualities, Hamilton's and Stanley's divisions were placed just beyond Bridge Creek, the infantry outposts were called in from Iuka, Burnsville, Rienzi and Danville, and the outpost at Chewalla retired to New-Alexander, and strengthened by another regiment and a battery, early on the morning ofixteenth, is entitled to great praise. He rode along the line of his regiment amid the storm of bullets, encouraging his brave boys, who had so lately suffered at Iuka, to remember their duty, and, although severely wounded, remained with his regiment until it marched off the field. Majors Cunningham, of the Fifteenth, and Pur
nt favorable for the purpose, to storm the formidable obstacle to his entrance into the town. The hour arrived, and, according to programme, Price opened with his artillery. In less than fifteen minutes the rattle of small arms was heard in the same direction, and Lovell, supposing that every thing was going on as well with Price as with himself, moved forward, and the fight became general. It seems, however, that during the night Rosecrans had received eight thousand reenforcements from Iuka, Rienzi, and Jacinto, and that immediately after Price commenced his cannonading the Yankees, who before were greatly superior to us in force, had thrown a heavy column against Price's right and centre. It was this sound of musketry which led to the supposition on the right that Price had engaged the enemy with infantry, according to plan. The fight continued with great severity, the enemy gradually forcing Price's right, while his left was advancing, one of his brigades having actually s