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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 109 45 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 82 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 81 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 66 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 58 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 50 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 42 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Iuka (Mississippi, United States) or search for Iuka (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
e most important occasions, to cut the Chattanooga Railroad east of Corinth. Ascending the Tennessee with the gun-boats as far as Eastport, Sherman proceeded thence in the direction of the railroad and destroyed the Big Bear Creek bridge east of Iuka. The Confederates thus lost, never to recover it, this important line of communication. The junction of Van Dorn and Beauregard, however, caused a similar movement on the part of the Federal troops, which until then had been operating on the rige Second Iowa and the Second Michigan, commanded by two officers, both destined to rapid advancement-Lieutenant-colonel Hatch and Colonel Philip Sheridan, who is now lieutenant-general of the army. and making a large circuit reached the village of Iuka on the 28th, where he bivouacked. Bearing to the right, he struck the Mobile and Ohio Railway near Booneville on the night of the 29th, and waited in the woods for daylight. On the 30th, at two o'clock in the morning, learning that the town of B
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Kentucky (search)
ecrans extended as far as the Tennessee through Iuka; it was scattered in small posts, so as to cove that lay there. Before the war the village of Iuka was frequented by the rich families of Mississim and try to hem in his enemy in the village of Iuka. To effect this he ordered Rosecrans to quit ts menacing that place. The general attack upon Iuka was fixed for the following day, the 19th. Rosigence, was unable to reach the neighborhood of Iuka till three or four o'clock in the afternoon of in the middle of the night; and when he entered Iuka, he only met the advance of Rosecrans, which wa had accumulated there. After the capture of Iuka, Grant found himself without the means of pursuatter having replaced Little, who was killed at Iuka), which formed Price's corps, and Lovell's divi plan, too complicated, like that of Grant's at Iuka, was but imperfectly carried out. At the firudences, he had turned Price's movement against Iuka to good account. Rosecrans, through his persis[5 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—Tennessee. (search)
ilway track, all the secondary lines would have been abandoned, as well as the stations of Bolivar, Jackson in Tennessee, Iuka, and even the fortifications of Corinth, whose works would have been destroyed, and the depots evacuated. Halleck did notition. He had unfortunately entrusted this post to Colonel Murphy, who had already exhibited great weakness in abandoning Iuka at the approach of Price. All the garrisons were on their guard except that of Holly Springs. This village had become authorities had committed a serious error in thus dividing their forces. If, instead of fighting the fruitless battles of Iuka and Corinth, and massing a large army under Pemberton in front of Grant, they had left the task of harassing the latter en which was entering Tennessee after the battle of Perryville and the other of which had been repelling the attacks against Iuka and Corinth, were therefore closely connected. They covered each other mutually, and Grant could not be at ease regarding