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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 55 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 37 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 25 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance of Van Dorn and Price-Price enters Iuka --battle of Iuka (search)
my of the Mississippi stationed at Corinth, Rienzi, Jacinto and Danville. There were at Corinth also [T. A.] Drd from his position south of Corinth by way of the Jacinto road. A small force was to hold the Jacinto road wJacinto road where it turns to the northeast, while the main force moved on the Fulton road which comes into Iuka further easuarters simultaneously. Troops enough were left at Jacinto and Rienzi to detain any cavalry that Van Dorn mighiving a dispatch from Rosecrans after midnight from Jacinto, twenty-two miles from Iuka, saying that some of hihat the rear of his column was not yet up as far as Jacinto. He said, however, that he would still be at Iuka at Barnets [Barnett's Corners], the point where the Jacinto road to Iuka leaves the road going east. He here te Fulton road. While still moving in column up the Jacinto road he met a force of the enemy and had his advancng the message was compelled to move west nearly to Jacinto before he found a road leading to Burnsville. This
ent would be followed of course by a maneuvre on the part of the enemy, now (at Tupelo under General Braxton Bragg, either to meet Buell or frustrate his designs by some counteroperation, I was expected to furnish, by scouting and all other means available, information as to what was going on within the Confederate lines. To do the work required, necessitated an increase of my command, and the Seventh Kansas Cavalry was therefore added to it, and my picket-line extended so as to cover from Jacinto southwesterly to a point midway between Rienzi and Booneville, and then northwesterly to the Hatchie River. Skirmishes between outposts on this line were of frequent occurrence, with small results to either side, but they were somewhat annoying, particularly in the direction of Ripley, where the enemy maintained a considerable outpost. Deciding to cripple if not capture this outpost, on the evening of July 27 I sent out an expedition under Colonel Hatch, which drove the enemy from the tow
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
wn headquarters, and Rosecrans was ordered to concentrate his two divisions at Jacinto, and to move thence upon Iuka, in order to flank Price and cut off his retreating made, Price learned about 2 P. M. (September 19th) that his pickets on the Jacinto road had been driven in, and that Rosecrans was advancing on that road in forcwith his whole force, thus leaving the Fulton road open. A rapid march from Jacinto (Hamilton's division leading, Sanborn's brigade in the advance) brought Rosecrollowing day, September 21st, our troops were back in their old encampments at Jacinto. Just two weeks later, the same divisions and brigades were measured against ecrans says ( Official Records, Vol. XVII., Pt. I., p. 74) that we moved from Jacinto at 5 A. M., with 9000 men, on Price's forces at Iuka. After a march of 18 milley's divisions, which had been watching to the south and south-west from near Jacinto to Rienzi, were closed in toward Corinth within short call. Railway Statio
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
ing the 27th, 28th, 29th, and 30th of September, the breastworks were completed joining the lunettes from College Hill on the left. A thin abatis made from the scattering trees, which had been left standing along the west and north fronts, covered the line between Robinett and the Mobile and Ohio; thence to Battery Powell the line was mostly open and without rifle-pits. To meet emergencies, Hamilton's and Stanley's divisions, which had been watching to the south and south-west from near Jacinto to Rienzi, were closed in toward Corinth within short call. Railway Station and Tishomingo Hotel, Corinth. From a War-time photograph. On the 28th I telegraphed to General Grant at Columbus, Kentucky, confirmation of my report of Price's movement to Ripley, adding that I should move Stanley's division to Rienzi, and thence to Kossuth, unless he had other views. Two days later I again telegraphed to General Grant that there were no signs of the enemy at Hatchie Crossing, and that m
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
rd from the vicinity of Tupelo, with about twelve thousand troops. He reached Jacinto on the 10th of September, when Murphy and his little force fled toward Corinthne thousand troops, through a drenching rain, and all bivouacked that night at Jacinto, on the Mobile and Ohio railway, nearly twenty miles southward from Iuka. On d heights, at a cross-road connecting the highways running from the village to Jacinto and Fulton respectively. There Hamilton formed a line of battle and advanced round. this little sketch shows the appearance of the battle-ground and the Jacinto road in front of the position of the Eleventh Ohio battery, looking toward Iuknd gullied ways, with all the skill of an experienced man. We passed along the Jacinto road to the crest of the hill on which the Eleventh Ohio battery was planted. Immediately after their junction at Ripley, a point about half way between Jacinto and Holly Springs, Price and Van Dorn prepared to march upon Corinth, the key
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
s town, we cut a new road. We passed through Jacinto and bivouacked 1½ miles east of it. June i road, our lines extending on the Ripley and Jacinto road toward Dick Smith's; the right of the ri to Burnsville, I pushed two companies toward Jacinto. The main road is a good one. Found the enemy's pickets 4 miles from Jacinto, Miss., in considerable force. Learning unquestionably there was ding officer of the cavalry forces at or near Jacinto will report at once in person to General Van an Dorn, independently of the regiment now at Jacinto already ordered to report to the latter offican Dorn, independently of the regiment now at Jacinto already ordered to report to the latter officington from the south, viz: The Danville, old Jacinto, and the Jacinto roads. In obedience to instJacinto roads. In obedience to instructions then received from you, general, I moved to the attack of the enemy at Farmington. Your ono force of the enemy has gone as far east as Jacinto. They have cut roads through the woods in ev[3 more...]
orps, will have the country around Rienzi and Jacinto carefully examined with reference to the mostrinth, Miss., May 5, 1862. From Corinth to Jacinto and Fulton, good; too far to eastward. Fro House and Danville, good. From Corinth to Jacinto, via Kossuth and Danville, good. From Rien a dispatch from Colonel Bradfute, commanding Jacinto, saying the enemy, 2,000 strong is advancing ned, but in General Bragg's handwriting. Jacinto, Miss., May 29, 1862. General Maury: General: . W. R. Bradfute, Colonel, Commanding Forces Jacinto. P. S.--My command 409 strong. [Indoavalry stationed so as to guard the road from Jacinto or Iuka to Fulton? Your obedient servant, ve cavalry at Marietta and out on the road to Jacinto and Fulton. No infantry at Fulton. Earl Van t the intersection of the roads from Iuka and Jacinto. Captain Falkner's company, of Brewer's batt of orders given, I shall promptly direct the Jacinto and Carrollville road picketed by a company o[9 more...]
ould be spared to reenforce him. Ord was to move on Iuka from the north; while Rosecrans, with Stanley's, was to rejoin his remaining division, under Hamilton, at Jacinto, nine miles south of Burnsville, thence advancing on Price from the south. This concentration was duly effected; Sept. 18. and Gen. Grant, who had now reached Burnsville, was advised that Rosecrans would attack Iuka, 19 1/2 miles from Jacinto, between 2 1/2 and 4 1/2 P. M. next day. Rosecrans moved accordingly, at 3 A. M, Sept. 19. in light marching order, duly advising Gen. Grant; and was within 7 1/2 miles of Iuka at noon, having been driving in the enemy's skirmishers for the precluded their reciprocal support, but advanced slowly — Hamilton's division in front — up to a point two miles from Iuka, where a cross-road connected that from Jacinto, on which lie was moving, with the road leading south-east-ward from Iuka to Fulton; where, at 4 P. M., the Rebels were found drawn up in force, holding a strong
Vicksburg, Miss. 11 Place unknown 2 Jackson, Miss. 2     Present, also, at Corinth; Hatchie River; Port Gibson; Raymond. notes.--Organized at Burlington, in July, 1861, leaving the State on August 11th. During the rest of the year and in the following winter it was on active duty in Missouri. In March, 1862, it engaged in the operations around New Madrid, Mo., after which it was stationed for a few months in various places in the Southwest. In August, 1862, it encamped at Jacinto, Miss., leaving there, September 18th, for Iuka, where it fought the next day under Rosecrans. It was then in Sanborn's (1st) Brigade of Hamilton's Division, and sustained the heaviest loss of any regiment in that battle, its casualties amounting to 37 killed, 179 wounded, and 1 missing; among the killed were five line officers. General Rosecrans said officially, that the glorious Fifth Iowa bore the thrice-repeated charges of the rebel left with a valor and determination seldom equalled, nev
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 12 (search)
for Eastport, with the purpose to cross the Tennessee River in the direction of Nashville, in aid of General Bragg, then in full career for Kentucky. General Grant determined to attack him in force, prepared to regain Corinth before Van Dorn could reach it. He had drawn Ord to Corinth, and moved him, by Burnsville, on Iuka, by the main road, twenty-six miles. General Grant accompanied this column as far as Burnsville. At the same time he had dispatched Rosecrans by roads to the south, via Jacinto, with orders to approach Iuka by the two main roads, coming into Iuka from the south, viz., the Jacinto and Fulton roads. On the 18th General Ord encountered the enemy about four miles out of Iuka. His orders contemplated that he should not make a serious attack, until Rosecrans had gained his position on the south; but, as usual, Rosecrans had encountered difficulties in the confusion of roads, his head of column did not reach the vicinity of Iuka till 4 P. M. of the 19th, and then his
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