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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 55 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 37 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 25 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Jacinto (Mississippi, United States) or search for Jacinto (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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He left at midnight on the twenty-eighth. with nine hundred chosen horsemen, splendidly equipped for fighting or running. The two battalions were composed of the Second Michigan and Second Iowa. His first point, by a very circuitous route, was Iuka — a beautiful town, looking like a New-England village, containing one thousand inhabitants, and is a resort for invalids, on account of its splendid chalybeate springs. From Iuka he crossed to Eastport and Fulton, thence by the Tuscumbia and Jacinto road to Cartersville, to Padens, and from there struck the head-waters of the Tombigbee River, and crossed to Boonville, on the Mobile Railroad. His movements were made with such boldness and celerity, that they were supposed by the people to be rebel cavalry. Upon approaching the place, a large train of cars containing three thousand infantry were on the track. The Colonel wisely kept in the bushes until they moved off — only sent his men above and clipped the telegraph-wires, that tell
ivision, the Eleventh brigade leading, marched from Jacinto on the morning of the nineteenth instant, to attacktle of Iuka. On the eighteenth you concentrated at Jacinto; on the nineteenth you marched twenty miles, drivin the Twenty-Sixth regiment Missouri Vols., near Jacinto, Miss., September 26, 1862. I am a Cincinnatian, aly superior force upon our little army encamped near Jacinto. We received orders to strike tents, load the wagonteers. Cincinnati Commercial account. Jacinto, Miss., Sept. 22, 1862. Eds. Com.: When last I wrotrnsville, when they were ordered to proceed to near Jacinto, and await orders. In the mean while our brigade (ral Rosecrans would move with part of his corps via Jacinto, and attack the enemy on the flank, while the balanbattalion at Burnsville, one at Roney's Mill on the Jacinto and Corinth road. Colonel Lee, with the Seventh Ka of rebel surgeons. Gen. Rosecrans then marched to Jacinto, and on the twenty-first of September established h
eport that my division, the Eleventh brigade leading, marched from Jacinto on the morning of the nineteenth instant, to attack the enemy at Iroud of the battle of Iuka. On the eighteenth you concentrated at Jacinto; on the nineteenth you marched twenty miles, driving in the rebel issippi, camp of the Twenty-Sixth regiment Missouri Vols., near Jacinto, Miss., September 26, 1862. I am a Cincinnatian, although I was appg with a greatly superior force upon our little army encamped near Jacinto. We received orders to strike tents, load the wagons with all comg. Missouri Volunteers. Cincinnati Commercial account. Jacinto, Miss., Sept. 22, 1862. Eds. Com.: When last I wrote you it was frofurther than Burnsville, when they were ordered to proceed to near Jacinto, and await orders. In the mean while our brigade (O.) remained inice, while General Rosecrans would move with part of his corps via Jacinto, and attack the enemy on the flank, while the balance of his colum
made, and the troops at nine o'clock on the morning of the third occupied the positions shown on the accompanying map. Hamilton on the right, Davidson the centre, McKean on the left, with an advance of three regiments of infantry and a section of artillery under Colonel Oliver on the Chewalla road, at or near Alexander's, beyond the rebel breastworks. The cavalry were disposed as follows: (See map accompanying Colonel Wiezner's report.) A battalion at Burnsville, one at Roney's Mill on the Jacinto and Corinth road. Colonel Lee, with the Seventh Kansas and a part of the Seventh Illinois at Kossuth and Boneyard, watching the rebels' right flank; Colonel Hatch and Captain Wilcox on the east and north fronts, covering and reconnoitring. The reasons for these dispositions flow obviously from the foregoing explanations of our ignorance of the north-westerly approach, and of the possibility that the rebels might threaten us on the Chewalla and attack us by the Smith's Bridge road on our
purpose, to storm the formidable obstacle to his entrance into the town. The hour arrived, and, according to programme, Price opened with his artillery. In less than fifteen minutes the rattle of small arms was heard in the same direction, and Lovell, supposing that every thing was going on as well with Price as with himself, moved forward, and the fight became general. It seems, however, that during the night Rosecrans had received eight thousand reenforcements from Iuka, Rienzi, and Jacinto, and that immediately after Price commenced his cannonading the Yankees, who before were greatly superior to us in force, had thrown a heavy column against Price's right and centre. It was this sound of musketry which led to the supposition on the right that Price had engaged the enemy with infantry, according to plan. The fight continued with great severity, the enemy gradually forcing Price's right, while his left was advancing, one of his brigades having actually succeeded in enterin