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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 55 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 37 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 25 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Jacinto (Mississippi, United States) or search for Jacinto (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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r near Rienzi, will follow the movements of the army when they pass Rienzi, with his entire force. IV. The commanding officer of the cavalry forces at or near Jacinto will report at once, in person to General Van Dorn, for orders, and will, until further orders, receive all of his orders from General Van Dorn. V. The commandgiment to report to Major-General Polk, one to Major-General Hardee, one to General Bragg, and one to Major-General Van Dorn, independently of the regiment now at Jacinto, already ordered to report to the latter officer. 12. After the departure of the troops from the intrenched line, a sufficient number of drums from each brigadment to report to Major-General Polk and one to Major-General Hardee, one to General Bragg and one to Major-General Van Dorn, independently of the regiment now at Jacinto, already ordered to report to the latter officer. 7. After the departure of the troops from the intrenched lines, a sufficient number of drums from each brigad
xt morning towards Pocahontas, which place we reached on the first of October. From all the information I could obtain, the following was the situation of the Federal army at that time: Sherman at Memphis, with about six thousand men; Hurlbert, afterwards Ord, at Bolivar, with about eight thousand; Grant (headquarters at Jackson), with about three thousand; Rosecrans at Corinth, with about fifteen thousand; together with the following outposts, viz.: Rienzi, twenty-five hundred; Burnville, Jacinto, and Iuka, about six thousand. At important bridges, and on garrison duty, about two or three thousand, making in the aggregate about forty-two thousand (42,000) men in West Tennessee. Memphis, Jackson, Bolivar, and Corinth were fortified, the works mounting siege guns, the outposts slightly fortified, having field-pieces. Memphis, Bolivar, and Corinth are in the arc of a circle, the chord of which, from Memphis to Corinth, makes an angle with due east line about fifteen degrees south.
e with all his available force, after leaving a sufficient force at Rienzi and Jacinto, to prevent the surprise of Corinth from that direction. Major-General Ord report, these figures may not be accurate. General Rosecrans was moving from Jacinto eastward, with about nine thousand men, making my total force with which to at was to move up the Fulton and Eastport road; the other, under Stanley, on the Jacinto road from Barnett's. On the eighteenth General Ord's command was pushed for commence the attack, and draw their attention that way while I move in on the Jacinto and Fulton road, and crushing in their left, cut off their retreat eastward. I propose to leave, in ten minutes, for Jacinto, whence I will despatch you by line of vedettes to Burnsville. Will wait a few minutes to hear from you before I was left in charge of Brigadier-General T. J. McKean. The southern front from Jacinto to Rienzi was under the charge of Colonel DuBois, with a small infantry and ca