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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 90 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 84 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 78 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 74 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 48 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 38 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 36 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 30 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 29 3 Browse Search
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177, 238,286,320,350,381,393,403 Pickett, George E., 407 Pine Mountain, Ga., 404 Pittsfield, Mass., 44 Pleasant Valley, Md., 346 Poems: The Army Bean, 137-38; The Army mule in time of peace, 297; The charge of the mule brigade, 295-97; The substitute, 216; The sweet little man, 26-28; We've drank from the same canteen, 223-24 Point of Rocks, Va., 392 Polk, Leonidas, 404 Pontoons, 381-91 Poolesville, Md., 244,404 Pope, John, 37, 71 Poplar Grove, Va., 393 Port Gibson, Miss., 370 Prentiss, Benjamin M., 301 Preston, N. D., 139 Rations, 108-42,206,226,291,320 Readville, Mass., 44-45 Reams Station, Va., 208,325-27 Revere Copper Company, 270 Reynolds, Thomas, 307 Richmond, 57, 139, 198, 230, 286, 313,320,358,364,391 Rip Raps, Va., 156, 162 Robertson's Tavern, Va., 134, 307 Rome, Ga., 400 Roxbury, Mass., 37-38,270 Saint Augustine, Fl., 248 Saint Louis, Mo., 279 Savannah, Ga., 384 Sawtelle, Charles G., 355 Sayler's Creek,
the Confederate armies in the east as reported by rebel pickets Vicksburg closely invested by General Grant Federal troops in southwest Missouri Federal supply train detained by high water at Neosho River Federal supplies running short at Fort Gibson high water in Grand River Indian women report heavy firing in the vicinity of Cabin Creek General Cabell on the east side of Grand River, near Cabin Creek, with artillery the suspense a National salute fired in honor of Independence day t Cabin Creek gallant charge of the colored regiment total rout of the enemy how the Federal troops crossed Cabin Creek under fire General Cabell unable to join General Cooper's division on account of high water arrival of supply train at Fort Gibson. The rebel pickets shouted across the river on the 24th instant, that our commissary train was on the way down, and that Colonel Dodd was commanding the escort to it, which is composed of two infantry regiments and four pieces of artillery.
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Vicksburg during the siege. (search)
ifications. On April 30th the four divisions of McClernand's corps crossed, and on the 1st of May moved, and in brief time encountered the Confederate command of General Bowen, consisting of the brigades of Green and Tracy, four miles from Port Gibson. The Confederates were choice men, and fought gallantly against great odds; but on the next day General Bowen was forced out of Port Gibson, and retired across the suspension bridge of the Bayou Pierre to Grand Gulf. His stay here was transiPort Gibson, and retired across the suspension bridge of the Bayou Pierre to Grand Gulf. His stay here was transient, seeing that his flank was almost immediately turned. On the 3d he marched to Hankinson's Ferry, on the Big Black, and there met Loring and his division, sent from Jackson by Pemberton, whose headquarters were at Edwards' Depot. On the 30th of April, General Sherman, commanding the Fifteenth Corps, after a slight feint on Haines' Bluff, on the Yazoo, returned to Milliken's Bend and proceeded to the main body. On the 8th, the three corps met at Willow Spring, where McClernand and McPherso
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Recollections of Grant. (search)
rshal replied: Over the river! Over the river! Ah! that night we slept with our guns in our hands; and another night, and another, saw more than one of our division camped beyond and over the river — in that last tenting-ground where the reveille was heard no more forever. I next saw Grant on May 18th, 1863, and this time at the battle of Champion hills, in rear of Vicksburg. We had crossed the Mississippi river at Grand Gulf, and swung off east and north; had fought the battles of Port Gibson, Raymond, and Jackson, and were overtaking Pemberton's army hastening to the walls of Vicksburg. It was a very hot day, and we had marched hard, slept little, and rested none. Among the magnolias on Champion hills, the enemy, forty to fifty thousand strong, turned on us. Sherman's Corps was already engaged far on the right as we approached the field in that overpowering Mississippi sun. Our brigade was soon in line, on the edge of a meadow, or open field sloping toward the woods, where
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Attack on Grand Gulf-operations below Vicksburg (search)
odney, from which point there was a good road leading to Port Gibson some twelve miles in the interior. The information was at the time, in order to intercept us they had to go by Port Gibson, the nearest point where there was a bridge to cross upoore sunset and McClernand was pushed on, hoping to reach Port Gibson and save the bridge spanning the Bayou Pierre before thestream in the presence of an enemy is always difficult. Port Gibson, too, is the starting point of roads to Grand Gulf, Vickernand's advance met the enemy about five miles west of Port Gibson at Thompson's plantation. There was some firing during did not come in time to render much assistance south of Port Gibson. Two brigades of McPherson's corps followed McClernand a Near the point selected by Bowen to defend, the road to Port Gibson divides, taking two ridges which do not diverge more thawed up our victory until night overtook us about two miles from Port Gibson; then the troops went into bivouac for the night.
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Capture of Port Gibson-Grierson's raid-occupation of Grand Gulf-movement up the Big Black- battle of Raymond (search)
on's raid-occupation of Grand Gulf-movement up the Big Black- battle of Raymond We started next morning [May 2] for Port Gibson as soon as it was light enough to see the road. We were soon in the town, and I was delighted to find that the enemy bridge, which he had burned. The troops were set to work at once to construct a bridge across the South Fork of the Bayou Pierre. At this time the water was high and the current rapid. What might be called a raft-bridge was soon constructed fromrk to repair the bridge there. The enemy soon left when he found we were building a bridge elsewhere. Before leaving Port Gibson we were reinforced by [Gen. Marcellus M.] Crocker's division, McPherson's corps, which had crossed the Mississippi at were to retard our progress until a position was secured when the time could be spared to observe them. It was at Port Gibson I first heard through a Southern paper of the complete success of Colonel [Benjamin H.] Grierson, who was making a rai
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Siege of Vicksburg (search)
n country, where no rear guards were necessary. The country is admirable for defence, but difficult for the conduct of an offensive campaign. All their troops had to be met. We were fortunate, to say the least, in meeting them in detail: at Port Gibson seven or eight thousand; at Raymond, five thousand; at Jackson, from eight to eleven thousand; at Champion's Hill, twenty-five thousand; at the Big Black, four thousand. A part of those met at Jackson were all that was left of those encountered at Raymond. They were beaten in detail by a force smaller than their own, upon their own ground. Our loss up to this time was: AtKilledWoundedMissing Port Gibson13171925 South Fork Bayou Pierre..1 Skirmishes, May319 Fourteen Mile Creek624[7] Raymond6633937 Jackson422517 Champion's Hill4101,844187 Big Black392373 Bridgeport..1 Total6953,425[266] Of the wounded many were but slightly so, and continued on duty. Not half of them were disabled for any length of time. Afte
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance on Cold Harbor-an anecdote of the war- battle of Cold Harbor-correspondence with Lee-Retrospective (search)
it was of short duration. The effect upon the Army of the Potomac was the reverse. When we reached the James River, however, all effects of the battle of Cold Harbor seemed to have disappeared. There was more justification for the assault at Vicksburg. We were in a Southern climate, at the beginning of the hot season. The Army of the Tennessee had won five successive victories over the garrison of Vicksburg in the three preceding weeks. They had driven a portion of that army from Port Gibson with considerable loss, after having flanked them out of their stronghold at Grand Gulf. They had attacked another portion of the same army at Raymond, more than fifty miles farther in the interior of the State, and driven them back into Jackson with great loss in killed, wounded, captured and missing, besides loss of large and small arms: they had captured the capital of the State of Mississippi, with a large amount of materials of war and manufactures. Only a few days before, they had
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXX. September, 1863 (search)
. I write this now as a grateful acknowledgment for the almost inestimable service you have done the country. I wish to say a word further. When you first reached the vicinity of Vicksburg I thought you should do what you finally didmarch the troops across the neck, run the batteries with the transports, and thus go below; and I never had any faith, except a general hope that you knew better than I, that the Yazoo Pass expedition and the like could succeed. When you got below and took Port Gibson, Grand Gulf, and vicinity, I thought you should go down the river and join Gen. Banks; and when you turned northward, east of the Big Black, I feared it was a mistake. I now wish to make the personal acknowledgment that you were right and I was wrong. A. Lincoln. If Pemberton had acted differently, if the movement northward had been followed by disaster, then what would Mr. Lincoln have written to Grant? Success is the only standard of merit in a general. September 10 A Mr.
ar. The swamps and shallow lakes of that region were fearful for men to pass through. They tried to convert them into canals, hoping they might be able to navigate some kind of a craft through them by which they could transfer the troops to Port Gibson, the point chosen to try to land below Vicksburg. After weeks of struggling with mud and water, with little success, General Logan, after conferring with General Grant, called for volunteers from his command to run the blockade on transports,iver front, on to the port of their destination before the sleeping sentinel knew anything of the daring enterprise. Once below Vicksburg, the transports carried the troops with rapidity from the western to the eastern shore of the river. At Port Gibson the Confederates made their first resistance to the invading army of the Mississippi, but they were completely routed. The bayous, swamps, and impenetrable forests of that whole valley of the Mississippi made it terrible for an army to move a
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