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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 90 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 84 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 78 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 74 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 48 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 38 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 36 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 30 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 29 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for Port Gibson (Mississippi, United States) or search for Port Gibson (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 4 document sections:

General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 6 (search)
f General Bragg's army. events in Mississippi. General Pemberton's dispatches. battle near Port Gibson. ordered to Mississippi to take chief command. The effects of the wounds received at Seveand Tracy's brigades on the route from that point into the interior, four miles in advance of Port Gibson. Here they were encountered and attacked early in the morning of the 1st of May, by the foural Pemberton telegraphed to me: A furious battle has been going on since daylight, just below Port Gibson.... General Bowen says he is outnumbered trebly.... Enemy can cross all his army from Hard Tiot be sent from here without giving up Tennessee. On the 2d Bowen was pressed back through Port Gibson, but in perfect order; and returned to his post-Grand Gulf. On the 3d, however, finding his ained no reference to the movements of the Federal army, nor to the result of the battle near Port Gibson, I asked him to give me information on the two points. His reply, written on the 6th or 7th,
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
ance. This telegram contained the first mention of the Federal army made to me by Lieutenant-General Pemberton, since that he dispatched while the contest at Port Gibson was going on. In the mean time, Lieutenant-General Pemberton had ordered Gregg's brigade coming from Port Hudson to Raymond, and W. H. T. Walker's, just arrmberton announced that he would move as early as practicable on the 15th, with a column of seventeen thousand men, to Dillon's, on the main road from Jackson to Port Gibson, for the purpose of cutting the enemy's communications, and compelling them to attack him, as he did not think his force sufficient to justify him in attacking. Clinton in obedience to orders. A minority advocated a plan for seizing the enemy's communications by placing the army on the road from Jackson and Raymond to Port Gibson, to compel General Grant to attack it. Although averse to both opinions, General Pemberton adopted that of the minority of his council, Lieutenant-General Pemb
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
ant-General Pemberton says: With a moderate cavalry force at my disposal, I am firmly convinced that the Federal army under General Grant would have been unable to maintain its communications with the Mississippi; and that the attempt to reach Jackson and Vicksburg from that base would have been as signally defeated in May, 1863, as a like attempt, from another base, had, by the employment of cavalry, been defeated in December, 1862. See his report, p. 82. In its march from Bruinsburg by Port Gibson to Jackson, and thence to Vicksburg, the Federal army drew its supplies from the country; and did not in the least depend on its communications with the Mississippi. Consequently, cavalry placed on what General Pemberton regarded as its communications, would have been altogetheruseless. Major. General Van Dorn's success, referred to, was obtained by the surprise of the garrison of Holly Springs and the destruction of General Grant's military supplies in depot in the town. At the time i
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
January 11, 1863. Lieutenant-General Pemberton, Port Gibson. The object of the expedition under Van Dorn wnant-General Pemberton's report of the battles of Port Gibson, Baker's Creek, and the siege of Vicksburg. eral troops were at Bethel Church, ten miles from Port Gibson, at three o'clock on the morning of the 29th, andarmy being then in position three miles south of Port Gibson, that General Baldwin was entering the latter pla Bowen had fallen back before a large force, from Port Gibson, in the direction of Grand Gulf, directed two reg in its results, the bloody encounter in front of Port Gibson nobly illustrated the valor and constancy of our December, 1862. The repulse of General Bowen at Port Gibson, and our consequent withdrawal to the north bank situated on the main road leading from Raymond to Port Gibson, seven and a half miles below Raymond, and nine an event of a movement south of Big Black, toward Bayou Pierre, has been sufficiently referred to in the body o