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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 166 22 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 68 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 35 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 28 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 23 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 2 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Ripley (Mississippi, United States) or search for Ripley (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
eer and the firmness of the Plan of the battle of Beaver Dam Creek, June 26. a, a, a, Approach of D. H. Hill and Longstreet from Richmond; b, b, b, Approach of A. P. Hill; c, c, c, Route of D. H. Hill to Old Cold Harbor, the day after the battle, to join Jackson's attack on Union right; d, d, d, Route of A. P. Hill to New Cold Harbor, to attack Union center; e, e, e, Route of Longstreet to Dr. Gaines's, to attack Union left. Of the five Confederate brigades engaged in this battle, one (Ripley's) was attached to the division of D. H. Hill and came up as a reinforcement to Pender, who, with Field, Archer, and Anderson, were part of the division of A. P. Hill, his other two divisions, Gregg and Branch, being held in reserve. The losses in their hopeless attack fell chiefly upon Archer, who made the first advance about 5 P. M., and later upon Pender and Ripley. Pegram's battery was badly cut up, losing forty-seven men and many horses. On the Union side, Martindale, Griffin, and Me
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
al Sturgis claims that he swept everything before him. So do his comrades who fought on his left. On the other hand, General Hood, who came up a short time before this advance, with the brigades of Wofford and Law, claims that he checked and drove back the Federals. G. T. Anderson reports that only his skirmishers were engaged. The surviving officers under G. B. Anderson (who was killed at Sharpsburg, and left no report) say that the same thing was true of their brigade in the afternoon. Ripley's brigade was not engaged at all. About dusk the 2d and 13th North Carolina Regiments attacked Fairchild's brigade and the batteries protected by it on the extreme Federal left, and were repulsed disastrously. Generals Burnside and Willcox say that the fight was continued until 10 o'clock at night. Hood was mistaken, then, in thinking that he had driven back the Federal advance. The opposing lines were close together at nightfall, and the firing between the skirmishers was kept up till a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
Bragg, who was sending a division of infantry to Ripley, Miss., had ordered Chalmers (June 30th) to take some 1 division, a little over 8000 men, came up to Ripley, Mississippi, where, on the 28th of September, he was joiny, confirmation of my report of Price's movement to Ripley, adding that I should move Stanley's division to Rihad a reasonable hope of success. Field returns at Ripley showed my strength to be about 22,000 men. Rosecranrage than marched the Army of West Tennessee out of Ripley on the morning of September 29th, on its way to Core. Hamilton will seize the Hatchie crossing on the Ripley road to-night. A very intelligent, honest young Irafter learning from the front that McPherson was in Ripley, I telegraphed General Grant as follows: General: Yours 8:30 P. M. received. Our troops occupy Ripley. I most deeply dissent from your views as to the mannrds, Vol. XVII., Pt. I., p. 378): Field returns at Ripley showed my strength to be about 22,000 men. It is e
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
, with Lovell's division, a little over 8000 men, came up to Ripley, Mississippi, where, on the 28th of September, he was joined by General Polumbus, Kentucky, confirmation of my report of Price's movement to Ripley, adding that I should move Stanley's division to Rienzi, and thencempt Corinth. I had a reasonable hope of success. Field returns at Ripley showed my strength to be about 22,000 men. Rosecrans at Corinth hador with more courage than marched the Army of West Tennessee out of Ripley on the morning of September 29th, on its way to Corinth. But ofyond Ruckersville. Hamilton will seize the Hatchie crossing on the Ripley road to-night. A very intelligent, honest young Irishman, an ambule, at midnight, after learning from the front that McPherson was in Ripley, I telegraphed General Grant as follows: General: Yours 8:30 P. M. received. Our troops occupy Ripley. I most deeply dissent from your views as to the manner of pursuing. We have defeated, routed, and d
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. (search)
39th Miss., Col. W. B. Shelby. Brigade loss: k, 21; w, 76; m, 71 = 168. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John S. Bowen: 6th Miss., Col. Robert Lowry; 15th Miss., Col. M. Farrell; 22d Miss., Capt. J. D. Lester; Miss. Battalion, Capt. C. K. Caruthers; 1st Mo., Lieut.-Col. A. C. Riley; La. (Watson) Battery, Capt. A. A. Bursley. Brigade loss: k, 28; w, 92; m1, 40 = 160. Cavalry Brigade, Col. W. H. Jackson: 1st Miss., Lieut.-Col. F. A. Montgomery; 7th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. J. G. Stocks. Brigade loss: k, 1. Unattached: La. Zouave Battalion, Maj. St. L. Dupiere. Loss: k, 2; m, 14 = 16. Total Confederate loss (including Hatchie Bridge, Oct. 5th): killed, 505; wounded, 2150; captured or missing, 2183 = 4838. General Van Dorn says ( Official Records, Vol. XVII., Pt. I., p. 378): Field returns at Ripley showed my strength to be about 22,000 men. It is estimated that at least 20,000 were brought into action at Corinth. Monument in the National Cemetery, Corinth. From a photograph taken in 1884.