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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 37 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 12 2 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 7, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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ian Creek to Cook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From Wynn's Landing to Wood's2 From Wood's to North Bend Landing4 1/2 North Bend Landing to Chambers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsburg2 From Pittsburg to Crump's Landing4 From Crump's Landing to Coffee8 From Coffee to Chalk-Bluff Landing2 From Chalk-Bluff Landing to Saltillo12 From Saltillo to Decatur Furnace18 ian Creek to Cook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From Wynn's Landing to Wood's2 From Wood's to North Bend Landing4 1/2 North Bend Landing to Chambers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsburg2 From Pittsburg to Crump's Landing4 From Crump's Landing to Coffee8 From Coffee to Chalk-Bluff Landing2 From Chalk-Bluff Landing to Saltillo12 From Saltillo to Decatur Furnace18
, was never known; what is certain is, that they gave him a cheer. With admirable patience and judgment, for many weeks, he listened to the complaints of each family, supplied them with the means lacking for their convenience in moving; registered and described their claims, and pacified the whole body of belligerents. He thus proved himself worthy of the thanks expressed for this service in the resolutions of the Legislature of Iowa, passed many years afterward, when he lay wounded in Saltillo after Buena Vista. His old friend General George Jones, from whom I have quoted before, has given the subjoined memorandum of the service: In the winter of 1831-32 Lieutenant Davis was sent to the Dubuque lead mines, which, at the termination of the trouble, had been occupied by the squatters. He was directed by the War Department, through Colonel Zachary Taylor, to remove these squatters, Lieutenant Wilson having preceded him and having failed to drive the people off. Lieuten
. That night he made us a speech, and told us that private rights must and should be respected. So he found out the owner of the corn and paid for the crop. I may say here, without fear of inaccuracy, that the First Mississippi Regiment, from the Colonel down to the last private, returned home without one article belonging to a citizen of Mexico. The sacred silver and gold vessels and the Church vestments studded over with precious stones, were in an open room at Monterey and also at Saltillo. The image of the Virgin of Guadalupe, a large doll dressed in satin, was admired and examined, but left untouched, though the frock in which she was arrayed was worked in arabesques adorned with diamonds, rubies, and emeralds of great price, and she wore a necklace of immense pearls which were of several colors. Colonel Davis saw one of the soldiers in friendly conversation with an old priest, holding admiringly a gold reliquary, the top of which was rayed with diamonds, several hundred,
, but seemed to dry up, and he attributed it to their eating so much red pepper and the dry climate. During Colonel Davis's absence the regiment was commanded by Major A. B. Bradford. On Monday, December 14th, the army began their march to Saltillo. Richard Griffith's, Adjutant, Diary. About fifty-eight miles from Monterey an express from General Worth brought news that Santa Anna with his forces was advancing upon Saltillo. Considerable excitement and numerous rumors in camp this night.Saltillo. Considerable excitement and numerous rumors in camp this night. Friday, December 18th: Remained in camp near Montmorelles, all this day. General Twigg's division returned to Monterey, General Taylor and staff accompanying him. General Quitman made chief of the division proceeding on to Victoria. Mississippi and Georgia regiments, with Baltimore battalion, forming two brigades, under Colonel Jackson, acting brigadier-general. Two Tennessee regiments, first brigade, under Colonel Campbell, acting brigadier-general. December 19th: Reached camp Novales
ing enemy hard. He already reports 10,000 prisoners and deserters from the enemy, and 15,000 stand ofarms captured. Thousands of the enemy are throwing away their arms. A farmer says that when Beauregard had learned that Colonel Elliott had cut the railroad on his line of retreat, he becamefrantic and told his men to save themselves as best they could. H. W. Halleck, Major-General (Commanding). To E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Corinth, June 9, 1862. The enemy has fallen back to Saltillo (Tupelo?), fifty miles by rail and near seventy by wagon road. General Pope estimates rebel loss from casualties, prisoners, and desertions at over 20,000, and General Buell at between 20,000 and 30,000. An Englishman employed in the Confederate Commissary Department says they had 120,000 men in Corinth, and that they cannot muster much over 80,000. Some fresh graves on the road have been opened andfoundfilled with arms (?). H. W. Halleck, Major-General. Corinth, July 3, 1862. I
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
nd day to remedy the error, and will very soon re-enforce him. H. W. Halleck. To the President. Corinth, June 9, 1862. The enemy has fallen back to Saltillo, 50 miles by rail and near 70 by wagon road. General Pope estimates rebel loss from casualties, prisoners, and desertion at over 20,000, and General Buell at beer wells must be destroyed this evening by a detachment from each brigade. All artesian-well machinery must be sent forthwith to the depot for transportation to Saltillo. 9th. Whenever the railroad engine whistles during the night near the intrenchments the troops in the vicinity will cheer repeatedly, as though re-enforcemeal Bragg on the map. V. General Polk's corps will conform its movement to that of General Bragg, starting at 2 p. m. on the 7th instant on the direct road to Saltillo, west of the railroad, halting at that place until further orders. His cavalry will remain where at present posted, and will follow his movement along the same
From Saltillo to Harrisburg, bad. From Saltillo to Mooresville, good road, 10 miles. Fromfound five creeks running on the west side of Saltillo in a southeasterly direction, separated from the road immediately west of the railroad to Saltillo, thence, via Priceville to Tupelo; and Generae to Saltillo, thence impassable; but that at Saltillo there is a good road on east side of the railwagons early to-morrow. A staff officer from Saltillo to-day reports very large supplies of ordnancs determined to leave General Polk's corps at Saltillo for about three days. He therefore directs theville, having sent off first everything from Saltillo. The road by the swamp is impassable for wagsippi. Two regiments of General Polk's are at Saltillo--Colonels Adams and Slemons. They are to remhis side of Birmingham, where a road forks to Saltillo, near Dr. Anderson's and Mr. Williams' farms, a good position, not easily turned by way of Saltillo. Much, however, is left to the intelligent d[9 more...]
eived in the true spirit of a gallant Southron. One would think it rather difficult to give mathematical instruction such a form as to imbue pupils with contempt and hatred for the North. But Hill has attempted the work, and has displayed no little ingenuity in the effort. He has framed problems beginning in the following style: A Yankee mixes a certain quantity of wooden nutmegs, which cost him one fourth cent apiece, with a quantity of real nutmegs, worth four cents apiece, etc. A Northern railroad is assessed one hundred and twenty thousand dollars damages for contusions and broken limbs caused by a collision of cars. The years in which the Governors of Massachusetts and Connecticut send treasonable messages to their respective legislatures, is expressed by four digits. The field of battle of Buena Vista is six and a half miles from Saltillo. Two Indiana volunteers ran away from the field of battle at the same time. Rhode Island Country Journal, February 28.
n two miles of Tupelo, we learned from the occupant of a house near by, (who mistook us for rebel cavalry,) that Federal troops from Corinth had that day been at Saltillo, eight miles north of Tupelo and that the rebels had fled south, abandoning Tupelo. Fearing that Major Coon might encounter too strong a foe, Lieut.-Col. Prihe supposed rebel camp-fires, seen the night before, proved to be the light of the depot burning at Coonawa and the camp-fires of Union troops from Corinth, near Saltillo, who left next morning before we reached their camp. Tuesday and Wednesday were spent in hard labor, by which all the trestle-work and bridges from Saltillo tSaltillo to Okolona, a distance of thirty-four miles, and a large bridge south of Okolona, across a branch of the Tombigbee River, were thoroughly destroyed, as well as large quantities of timber lying along the railroad side for repairing purposes. The enemy was seen in Verona and Okolona, but fled — returning however, in some force to Ok
te, so that the rebel rear-guard had been gone out of the town about an hour when the cavalry advance of our forces rode into it. At Pontotoc, Col. Dickey, seeing the great inequality of numbers between his own force and that of the enemy, waited to let them pass through, which they did, without knowing that he was watching them. After Van Dorn had passed through toward the north, Colonel Dickey passed through toward the east, and kept on over to the Mobile and Ohio road, striking it at Saltillo; from that place northward he tore up the track and burned the bridges for thirty miles, making a terrible gap in that great line of communication between the South and the rebel stronghold at Chattanooga. But to return to the Holly Springs affair: There were enough troops in Holly Springs to have held it against the enemy if any man of courage or judgment had had command. Gen. Grant's despatch reached Col. Murphy on the evening previous to the enemy's appearance near the town. Ther
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