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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 6: Appomattox. (search)
ont we make. The scene darkens. In a few minutes the tide is turned; the incoming wave is at flood; the barrier recedes. In truth, the Stonewall men hardly show their well-proved mettle. They seem astonished to see before them these familiar flags of their old antagonists, not having thought it possible that we could match our cavalry and march around and across their pressing columns. Their last hope is gone,--to break through our cavalry before our infantry can get up. Neither to Danville nor to Lynchburg can they cut their way; and close upon their rear, five miles away, are pressing the Second and Sixth Corps of the Army of the Potomac. It is the end! They are now giving way, but keep good front, by force of old habit. Halfway up the slope they make a stand, with what perhaps they think a good omen,behind a stone wall. I try a little artillery on them, which directs their thoughts towards the crest behind them, and stiffen my lines for a rush, anxious for that crest my
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 10: Sherman's Army. (search)
understood it from Lincoln, made terms for the surrender of Johnston's army, involving matters pertaining to the political status of the Southern people and a policy of reconstruction,--undoubtedly therein exceeding any prerogatives of a military commander,--the President disapproved of them and gave directions for hostilities to be resumed. But in carrying these into effect, Secretary Stanton took an equally unwarrantable course in his orders to Meade and Sheridan, and to Wright (then at Danville), to pay no attention to Sherman's armistice or orders, but to push forward and cut off Johnston's retreat, while in fact Johnston had virtually surrendered already to Sherman. Halleck repeated this with added disrespect; and still more to humiliate Sherman, Stanton gave sanction by his name officially signed to a bulletin published in the New York papers entertaining the suggestion that Sherman might be influenced by pecuniary considerations to let Jeff Davis get out of the country. Thi
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance of Van Dorn and Price-Price enters Iuka --battle of Iuka (search)
Advance of Van Dorn and Price-Price enters Iuka --battle of Iuka At this time, September 4th, I had two divisions of the Army of the Mississippi stationed at Corinth, Rienzi, Jacinto and Danville. There were at Corinth also [T. A.] Davies' division and two brigades of [J.] McArthur's, besides cavalry and artillery. This force constituted my left wing, of which Rosecrans was in command. General [E. O. C.] Ord commanded the centre, from Bethel to Humboldt on the Mobile and Ohio railroad and from Jackson to Bolivar where the Mississippi Central is crossed by the Hatchie River. General Sherman commanded on the right at Memphis with two of his brigades back at Brownsville, at the crossing of the Hatchie River by the Memphis and Ohio railroad. This made the most convenient arrangement I could devise for concentrating all my spare forces upon any threatened point. All the troops of the command were within telegraphic communication of each other, except those under Sherman. By bring
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
ought they must have the impression that our defensive works at Corinth would be pretty formidable. I doubted if they would venture to bring their force against our command behind defensive works. I therefore said: The enemy may threaten us and strike across our line entirely, get on the road between us,and Jackson and advance upon that place, the capture of which would compel us to get out of our lines; or he may come in by the road from Tupelo so as to interpose his force between us and Danville. But all the time I inclined to the belief that it would not be for his interest to do that. I thought that perhaps he would cross the Memphis and Charleston road and, going over to the Mobile and Ohio road, force us to move out and fight him in the open country. October 2d, I sent out a cavalry detachment to reconnoiter in the direction of Pocahontas. They found the enemy's infantry coming close in, and that night some of our detachment were surprised, and their horses and a few of t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
ought they must have the impression that our defensive works at Corinth would be pretty formidable. I doubted if they would venture to bring their force against our command behind defensive works. I therefore said: The enemy may threaten us and strike across our line entirely, get on the road between us,and Jackson and advance upon that place, the capture of which would compel us to get out of our lines; or he may come in by the road from Tupelo so as to interpose his force between us and Danville. But all the time I inclined to the belief that it would not be for his interest to do that. I thought that perhaps he would cross the Memphis and Charleston road and, going over to the Mobile and Ohio road, force us to move out and fight him in the open country. October 2d, I sent out a cavalry detachment to reconnoiter in the direction of Pocahontas. They found the enemy's infantry coming close in, and that night some of our detachment were surprised, and their horses and a few of t
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
e p. 683. June 3 marched through Corinth, Danville, and Rienzi toward Blackland, halting 4 miles 3, passing through the village of Rienzi and Danville, and encamped 4 miles from Booneville, not ha at 10 p. m., and our troops were over and in Danville, a mile beyond the bridge, early in the mornithe whole force of the enemy had retreated to Danville and thence to Rienzi. The Tenth had but 1 woivision crossed the river and marched through Danville and Rienzi, and bivouacked for the night. move on the direct road from his position to Danville by Cleburne's camp, which lies on the east oforps in the evening of the 8th instant on the Danville road toward Farming. ton, and formed line ontrenchments of Corinth, and my center on the Danville road, about a mile in advance of the crossingition to Booneville, Miss. one mile from Danville, May 30, 1862. [Sir :] Tuscumbia Creek is headquarters Army of the Mississippi, Near Danville, June 1, 1862. It gives me great pleasure [5 more...]
at 4 miles from Corinth; then on west side to Danville; then to Booneville. 3d. Corinth to Danvition across the Ridge road from Farmington to Danville, via Morrison's house. 2. Cleburne's brigato be abandoned, you will retire your army on Danville by the Farmington and Danville road, thence tthe bridge across Tuscumbia, 1 mile north of Danville, it must be destroyed. Depots of provisions,re the Corinth road intersects or joins this (Danville). Four cannon-shots were fired at them; 4 menhe crossing of the railroad by Farmington and Danville road. L. E. Polk, Colonel Fifteenth Arkansases that you will move your division along the Danville road until your right is opposite General Rusall form their parks before daylight near the Danville road, but no wagon or vehicle will move into diately report the fact to General Johnson at Danville, who will take instant measures to withdraw oartment, May 31, 1862. General B. R. Johnson, Danville: General: Instead of going to Booneville f[14 more...]
Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff. headquarters, June 4, 1862. Maj. Gen. D. O. Buell: You will have f get guides from General Pope's command on their road to Danville. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. headquarters, June 4, 1862. Major-General Buell: Pope's forces are nearly all past Danville and I suppose now are near BaldwDanville and I suppose now are near Baldwin. He expects an engagement to-day. I think you will find the road clear of Pope's troops. Lieutenant North will report to you as a guide this morning and General Pope will send others to meet you. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. Corinth, Miss., [June 4, 1862]. Major-General Buell: I directed General Wood to push forward a. B. Fry: Brig. Gen. J. T. Boyle will to-day relieve me of this command by virtue of the following order: Washington, May 27, 1862. General J. T. Boyle, Danville: You are relieved from the command of your brigade before Corinth, and are directed to report to the Military Board of Kentucky to take command of the forces
thward is Shiloh Church, and some ten miles farther is the road-crossing known as Monterey, where there were half-a-dozen houses. The region is thinly and recently settled; still mainly covered by the primitive forest; gently rolling, and traversed by a number of inconsiderable crecks, making eastward and northward, to be lost in the Tennessee. At Pittsburg Landing, the Tyler found a Rebel battery of six guns, which it silenced, after a mutual cannonade of two hours; returning thence to Danville and reporting. The movement of the army southward on transports was continued — the 46th Ohio, Col. Worthington, leading, on the transport B. J. Adams--so far as Savannah, where it was landed, March 10. and proceeded to take military possession. All the transports, 69 in number, conveying nearly 40,000 men, were soon debarking the army, with its material, at and near this place, whence Gen. Lew. Wallace's division was dispatched March 12. to Purdy, a station 16 miles W. S.W., where
would undertake to mask me, and, passing north, give me an opportunity to beat the masking force, and cut off their retreat. This hope gained some strength from the supposed difficulties of the country lying in the triangle formed by the Memphis and Charleston, the Mobile and Ohio railroads and Cypress Creek. To be prepared for eventualities, Hamilton's and Stanley's divisions were placed just beyond Bridge Creek, the infantry outposts were called in from Iuka, Burnsville, Rienzi and Danville, and the outpost at Chewalla retired to New-Alexander, and strengthened by another regiment and a battery, early on the morning of the second. During that day evidences increased showing the practicability of the country north-west of us, and disclosed the facts, not before known, that there were two good roads from Chewalla eastward, one leading directly into the old rebel intrenchments, and the other crossing over into the Pittsburgh Landing road. Accordingly, the following disposit
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