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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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November 21.--It passed through Eatonton and marched to Little River. November 22.--Marched to Milledgeville, the capital left the Fourteenth corps at Eatonton factory, crossed Little River, and camped. November twenty-second, marched through Eatonton, crossed Little River on pontoons, and camped at Meriwether. November twenty-third, marched through Milledgevil November 22.--Marched at six o'clock A. M. ; crossed Little River on pontoon-bridge; reached Milledgeville at one P. M., unty. November 21.--Marched eighteen miles south to Little River, passing through Eatonton. November 22.--Marched twehe column still moved slowly. My brigade did not cross Little River until half-past 12 P. M. From that point the march was lantation. 22d. Marched at seven A. M., crossed the Little River on pontoons, and joined the corps at Milledgeville, therels sorghum syrup. During the following week, between Little River and Louisville, passed through low swampy country, but
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Missouri, 1863 (search)
e Militia Cavalry. March 1-2: Skirmishes, BloomfieldMISSOURI--2d State Militia Cavalry (Detachment). March 2: Skirmish, NeoshoKANSAS--3d Indian Home Guard. March 3: Raid on GranbyMISSOURI--8th State Militia Cavalry (Detachment). Union loss, 4 killed. March 5-13: Operations in Newton and Jasper CountiesKANSAS--6th Cavalry (Co's "A," "C," "H"). March 9: Skirmish near SherwoodKANSAS--6th Cavalry (Co's "A," "C," "H"). March 9-15: Exp. from Bloomfield to Chalk Bluff, Ark.,, and Gum Slough, Kennett, etc., Mo., with skirmishesMISSOURI--2d State Militia Cavalry. March 19-23: Scout to DoniphanMISSOURI--2d State Militia Cavalry. March 21: Skirmish near DoniphanMISSOURI--2d State Militia Cavalry. March 22: Skirmish, Blue Springs, near IndependenceMISSOURI--1st and 5th State Militia Cavalry. Union loss, 9 killed, 5 missing. Total, 14. March 25-April 4: Scouts from Bloomfield to Scatterville, Ark.MISSOURI--2d State Militia Cavalry. WISCONSIN--1st Cavalry. March 28: Attack and massacre o
cross the South Anna. He sent his scouting parties up to within eleven miles of Richmond, where they burned a hospital train. The object of this move was to divert the attention of the enemy from the North and South Anna bridges and bridges over Little river, which Merritt was ordered to destroy with Devin's division; Custer's main column meanwhile being held at the Negro-foot crossing of the South Anna. General Merritt was ordered to follow the railroad to Hanover Junction, cross the Little river, and go into camp on the north bank of South Anna. In the attack upon the railroad bridge over the South Anna, the Fifth United States cavalry charged up to the bridge, dismounted, dashed across it, and drove away the company of artillery who tried to defend it, and turned their own guns--four twenty-pounder Parrotts — upon them. I here received a despatch from the Lieutenant-General that supplies were at the White House for me, and one brigade of infantry; and also captured the followi
r before (Ms.). I cannot accept even an implied compliment at the expense of one whose past services and present value to the cause of human freedom I feel to be unequalled. Elsewhere, the Liberator's cry, No Union with Slaveholders! (now printed weekly at the head of the paper) was caught up and re-echoed in the abolition ranks—by the Western New York Anti-Slavery Society, in Feb. 5-7, 1845; Lib. 15.33. February; by a vast majority of the Eastern Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society at Kennett, in August. In Ohio, the Aug. 11-13; Lib. 15.135, 142. Anti-Slavery Bugle was founded as the disunion organ of the Ohio American Anti-Slavery Society. Lib. 15.109. The levers of disunion ready to the hands of the Massachusetts abolitionists were the recent expulsions of the Ante, pp. 130, 131. State's delegates from South Carolina and Louisiana, and the impending annexation of Texas. At the annual meeting just referred to, Wendell Phillips reported Lib. 15.19. resolves that the Go
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
See also Book III, Chap. II. Meanwhile he had built, in his old Pennsylvania haunts, a manorial house named Cedarcroft, at a cost of $17,000, then a good deal of money,—a roomy dwelling with, typically, a tower that commanded an extended view of the gentle Pennsylvania countryside. Cedarcroft became a haven of refuge from his arduous travels, where he might write undisturbed, and converse at ease with Boker and Stedman and the rest, and smoke his narghile, and shock the good people of Kennett through his Continental Gemuthlichkeit in the use of liquor; it became also, unfortunately, as Stoddard says, a Napoleonic business for a poet, who, in committing himself to earning a large income, sometimes $18,000 a year, by writing prose, appreciably injured his poetry. And poetry was his passion, his religion, as he says with proud humility in Porphyrogenitus. In 1874 he told Howells that he was trying desperately to bury his old reputation as a traveller and writer of travel books
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
ered at Shreveport, La., June 22, 1865. He was a gallant soldier and in the course of his career was permitted to participate in nearly all the famous military events of the Trans-Mississippi, including the battles of Fort Scott, Kan.; Lexington, Mo.; Helena, Little Rock, Jenkins' Ferry and Pine Bluff, Ark., and Pilot Knob, Brunswick, Big Blue and Independence, Mo. During the great raid through Missouri under General Price he was in ninety-eight battles and skirmishes. He was wounded at Kennett, Mo., Pine Bluff, Ark., and severely at Independence, Mo. A few months after the close of hostilities he left his home at St. Joseph, and for a year found mercantile employment at New Orleans. After two years of the same occupation at Berryville, Va., he began to study for the ministry. He was graduated at the Columbia theological seminary, at Columbia, in 1872, and from that date until 1880 served the congregation at Hopewell church, Marion, S. C. Thence he was called to his present charge
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
H11 Kenansville, N. C. 76, 2; 118, 1; 135-A; 138, G7 Kenesaw, Ga. 58, 2; 76, 2; 118, 1; 149, G13 Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. 43, 4; 49, 4; 57, 1, 57, 3; 59, 1, 59, 3; 60, 1; 62, 6, 62, 13 65, 2, 65, 5; 88, 2; 96, 5; 149, G13 Kennett, Mo. 117, 1; 153, F9 Kenton, Tenn. 153, F12 Kentucky (State) 140-142; 150; 151; 153; 162-171 Army of the Cumberland, campaign, 1861-1865 24, 3; 118, 1 Bowling Green, defenses 103, 1 Camp Nelson, defenses 102, 2 66, 8 Engagement, Oct. 25, 1864 66, 8 Little Piney, Mo. 152, G5 Little River, Ala. 46, 3; 48, 1; 71, 13; 110, 1; 149, F9 Little River, Ark. 54, 1; 159, F10 Little River, Indian Territory 119, 1; 159, A3 Little River, Mo. 153, F9 Little River, Tenn. 24, 3; 142, E3 Little River, Va. 7, 1; 16, 1; 27, 1; 55, 4; 74, 1; 81, 3, 81, 6, 81, 7; 86, 13; 91, 2; 92, 1; 96, 2; 100, 1; 137, A6, 137, D7; 142, B11 Little River Turnpike, Va. 5, 10; 6,