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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 72 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 13 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Arkansas troops in the battle of Wilson's Creek. (search)
by the secessionists of north Missouri, who, to the number of 5000 or 6000, were armed and organized and desirous of joining the army of General Price in south-west Missouri. To break this blockade became the object of General Price. Of the four Federal posts, Jefferson City, Boonville, Lexington, and Kansas City, Lexington was the easiest and most important one to take. General Price left Springfield on the 25th of August, dispersed Lane's forces at Drywood, September 2d, and reached Warrensburg in pursuit of Colonel Peabody at daybreak, September 1Oth; Peabody getting into Lexington first, Price, after a little skirmishing with Mulligan's outpost, bivouacked within 212 miles of Lexington. In the morning (12th) Mulligan sent out a small force which burnt a bridge in Price's path. Price then crossed to the Independence Road, and waited for his infantry and artillery. These came up in the afternoon, and Price then advanced toward Lexington, and drove Mulligan behind his defenses
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 8.25 (search)
ort. We reached Tipton, but found neither Colonel Marshall nor the enemy, and we passed on to a pleasant spot near Lexington where we prepared for our entry into the city. The trouble was not so much the getting into Lexington as the getting out. At Lexington we found Colonel Marshall's cavalry regiment and about 350 of a regiment of Home Guards. On the 10th of September we received a letter from Colonel Everett Peabody, of the 13th Missouri Regiment, saying that he was retreating from Warrensburg, 34 miles distant, and that the rebel General Price was in full pursuit with an army of 10,000 men. A few hours later Colonel Peabody joined us. There were then at this post the Irish Brigade, Colonel Marshall's Illinois cavalry regiment (full), Colonel Peabody's regiment, and a part of the 14th Missouri--in all about 2780 men, with one six-pounder, Doubtless an accidental mistake. Colonel Mulligan had 7 six-pounders (Waldschmidt, 2; Adams, 3, and Pirner, 2); Pirner also had 2 br
rapidly to meet them. But before they got within gunshot, the hearts of the rebels failed them; quickly as they could, they checked the career of their horses, turned tail and fled from the field, leaving behind them seven dead and several wounded and taken prisoners. Not a person was injured on the National side.--Cincinnati Gazette, April 5. A detachment of the First Illinois cavalry, under Capt. Thompson, overtook a guerrilla band under Colonel Parker, about ten miles west of Warrensburg, Mo. Fifteen rebels were killed and twenty-five taken prisoners. Among the latter Col. Parker and Capt. Walton. The Union loss was two killed and several wounded. Shipping Point, Va., was occupied by the National troops. As the steamer Mount Vernon passed that place they had raised the flag of the Union, and the band was playing the Star-Spangled Banner. All the rebels who have been in that vicinity for some time past have left, with the exception of two or three roaming companies of
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
andoned. Leaving a small force there, he resumed his September. march, and reached Warrensburg, in Johnson County, on the 11th. September. In the mean time, he had issued a proclamation to inhabitae force was increased from time to time, until early in September, when Price was approaching Warrensburg, the number of Union troops at Lexington was nearly twenty-eight hundred, These troops werhe chief command. Peabody's regiment had come in, on the following day, in full retreat from Warrensburg, having been driven away by the approach of the overwhelming forces of Price. These troops had been sent from Lexington to Warrensburg, to secure about $100,000 In money. Price was informed of this movement, and had hurried forward, by forced marches, to seize the treasure before the Nate 11th of September, after a violent storm that had raged for several hours, Price moved from Warrensburg toward Lexington, and that night encamped two or three miles from the city. Three he rested
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
d, to watch Price, who was then at Osceola with about eight thousand men, and to prevent a reconnaissance of the main column of the Nationals, he moved his whole body Dec. 16, 1861 westward and took position in the country between Clinton and Warrensburg, in Henry and Johnson counties. There were two thousand Confederates then near his lines, and against these Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, of the Seventh Missouri, was sent with a considerable cavalry force that scattered them. Having accomplished this, Brown returned to the main army, Dec. 18. which was moving on Warrensburg. Informed that a Confederate, force was on the Blackwater, at or near Milford, North of him, Pope sent Colonel Jefferson C. Davis and Major Merrill to flank them, while the main body should be in a position to give immediate aid, if necessary. Davis found them in a wooded bottom on the west side of the Blackwater, opposite the mouth of Clear Creek. His forces were on the east side, and a bridge that spanned
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 10: the last invasion of Missouri.--events in East Tennessee.--preparations for the advance of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
ird Missouri, and small detachments of the Ninth Missouri militia and Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry. This temerity would have been punished by a serious, if not fatal, blow upon Price's main body, had not the pursuing General Smith been detained at the Lamine River, on account of the destruction of the railway bridge at the crossing on his route. There he was overtaken by General Mower, when, with a few days' provisions, and in light marching order, he pushed on directly westward, toward Warrensburg, while Pleasanton, with his cavalry, including those under Winslow, was sweeping over the country northward to the Missouri River, in the direction of Lexington, which Price's advance reached on the 20th of October. Blunt, who had come out of Kansas, had been driven back to Independence, near the western border of Missouri, by Price, and the ranks of the latter were being increased by recruits. And now a single false step of the pursuers deprived them of the solid advantages they had
d Fort Scott, on the edge of Kansas, which was found evacuated. Thence, advancing north by east unopposed, he reached Warrensburg on the 10th of September, and, on the 11th, drew up before Lexington. A young city of five or six thousand inhabitath, of Mulligan's arrival at Lexington; and another dispatch on the same day informed him that Price was reported near Warrensburg with 5,000 to 15,000 men; also that Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, commanding, at Jefferson City, a district which included Lexi Washington City: Reliable information from the vicinity of Price's column shows his present force to be 11,000 at Warrensburg and 4,000 at Georgetown, with pickets extending toward Syracuse. Green is making for Booneville, with a probable forcolonels. Lexington and its vicinity being strongly Rebel, Maj. White abandoned it on the 17th, and moved southerly by Warrensburg and Warsaw to the front, which they struck at Pomme de Terre river, fifty-one miles north of Springfield. Still push
on the line of the Missouri, and retreat southward. Having, by forced marches and his strength in cavalry, gained a position between them and their base at Osceola, he forced them to a hurried flight, with the loss of nearly 300 prisoners and most of their baggage, including 70 wagons laden with clothing and supplies for Price, who lay at Osceola with 8,000 men. Meantime, a detachment of Pope's forces, under Col. Jeff. C. Davis, surprised Dec. 18. a Rebel camp at Milford, not far from Warrensburg, and compelled its surrender at discretion. Three colonels, 17 captains, over 1,000 prisoners, 1,000 stand of arms, 1,000 horses, and an abundance of tents, baggage, and supplies, were among the trophies of this easy triumph. Pope's losses in these operations scarcely exceeded 100 men; while his prisoners alone were said to be 2,500. Among them was Col. Magoffin, brother of the late Governor of Kentucky. Price, thus roughly handled before he had been able to concentrate his forces,
s bold stroke ought to have insured the destruction of at least half the Rebel army, which an over-whelming Union force was now moving to inclose and crush. But A. J. Smith was stopped, with our supplies, at the Lamine, where the enemy had burned the railroad bridge; and where Mower joined him: when, taking five days rations, Smith advanced Oct. 18-19. to Dunksburg; Pleasanton, with our cavalry, including Mower's, under Winslow, being well advanced, on a line stretching northward from Warrensburg. The enemy was north-west of this, and seemed disposed to stay there: his advance Oct. 18-19. reaching Lexington, driving Gen. Blunt with a force from Kansas, who, after a sharp skirmish retreated on Independence. Rosecrans, learning this by telegraph, directed Oct. 20. Pleasanton, who had been demonstrating toward Waverly, to move in force on Lexington, ordering Smith to follow; and both, of course, obeyed. These order. seem to have been mistakes — very natural, perhaps, b
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 33. capture of Lexington, Missouri. (search)
I learned that a detachment of Federal troops and Home Guards were marching from Lexington to Warrensburg, to rob the bank in that place, and plunder and arrest the citizens of Johnson County, in accnd rapid marching, I determined to press forward so as to surprise the enemy, if possible, at Warrensburg. Therefore, after resting a few hours, we resumed the march at sunset, and marched without i forward with the larger part of my mounted men till we came, about day-break, within view of Warrensburg, where I ascertained that the enemy had hastily fled about midnight, burning bridges behind tidea of pursuing the enemy that day; my infantry and artillery having come up, we encamped at Warrensburg, whose citizens vied with each other in feeding my almost famished soldiers. An unusually viundred and fifty men under Col. Van Horn, and marched to Lexington. On the 7th, they went to Warrensburg and took a lot of coin from the banks, and returned on the 11th. The whole number of troops
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