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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 666 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 124 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 74 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 48 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 46 22 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 42 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 40 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 32 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
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it was only held by a small brigade, whereas the enemy was seen advancing upon it in much superior numbers, Sherman signalled a despatch from Vining's Station to Kenesaw, and from Kenesaw to Allatoona, whence it was again signalled to Rome. It requested General Corse, who was at the latter place, to hurry back to the assistance oKenesaw to Allatoona, whence it was again signalled to Rome. It requested General Corse, who was at the latter place, to hurry back to the assistance of Allatoona. Meanwhile, Sherman was propelling the main body of his army in the same direction. On reaching Kenesaw, the signal officer reported, says Sherman, in his Memoirs, that since daylight he had failed to obtain any answer to his call for Allatoona; but while I was with him he caught a faint glimpse of the tell-tale flagKenesaw, the signal officer reported, says Sherman, in his Memoirs, that since daylight he had failed to obtain any answer to his call for Allatoona; but while I was with him he caught a faint glimpse of the tell-tale flag through an embrasure, and after much time he made out these letters CRSEHER and translated the message Corse is here. It was a source of great relief, for it gave me the first assurance that General Corse had received his orders, and that the place was adequately garrisoned. General Corse has informed me that the distance b
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., General Polk and the battle of Belmont. (search)
is boats. This order was executed with alacrity and in double-quick time. The route over which we passed was strewn with the dead and wounded of the conflicts of Colonel Marks and General Cheatham, already alluded to, and with arms, knapsacks, overcoats, etc. On arriving at the point where his transports lay, I ordered the column, headed by the 154th Regiment of Tennessee Volunteers, under cover of a field thickly set with corn, to General Leonidas Polk, Bishop of Louisiana (killed near Kenesaw, June, 1864). from a photograph. be deployed along the river bank within easy range of the boats. This being accomplished, a heavy fire was opened upon them simultaneously, riddling them with balls, and, as we have reason to believe, with heavy loss to the enemy. Under this galling fire he cut his lines and retreated from the shore, many of his soldiers being driven overboard by the rush of those behind them. Our fire was returned by heavy cannonading from his gun-boats, which discharged
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Dalton-Atlanta operations. (search)
age, below, it is said that the Confederates had signal stations and fresh lines of parapets on Kenesaw, Lost Mountain and Pine Mount. Kenesaw was not occupied by our (Southern) troops until the 19tKenesaw was not occupied by our (Southern) troops until the 19th, and Lost Mountain was abandoned on the 8th. Our only signal stations were on Kenesaw, as an observatory, and at headquarters. Page 53: The circumstances of General Polk's death were these: He haKenesaw, as an observatory, and at headquarters. Page 53: The circumstances of General Polk's death were these: He had accompanied General Hardee and me to Pine Mount to reconnoitre. We placed ourselves in a battery near the summit, on the enemy's side. After seeing everything that interested us, we turned to leaor numbers enabled him to make and man. The positions gained on the 21st, near the south end of Kenesaw, and on a hill near, were outside of our position --not occupied by our line, and if at all, on two semblances of mountains-Rocky Face, which covered the march by which he flanked Dalton and Kenesaw, less than two miles long. The country was no more unfavorable for the offensive than the Wild
on hail, and canister were hurled down upon them like the avalanches of the Rocky Mountains. To proceed further or remain where they were was impossible. Besides the hundreds of dauntless men, such grand heroes as Generals Harker and McCook were killed. Finally, the advice of General Logan to flank the position was adopted, but not until the scaling experiment had cost many valuable lives. Johnston, seeing that his rear was threatened by the flank movement, fell back toward Atlanta from Kenesaw. General Logan commanded the Fifteenth Corps, General Dodge the Sixteenth Corps, General Blair the Seventeenth Corps, of the Army of the Tennessee. Between these officers and General McPherson there existed the most perfect harmony. General Logan and General McPherson were thoroughly impressed with the fact that in front of the Fifteenth Corps there was massed a large force of the enemy after the fighting that had taken place around Decatur. General Sherman believed the Confederates
red. When division after division was hailed with such deafening shouts, General Logan's heart beat high with pride and gratification. He cared little that they were called Sherman's bummers, or that scarcely a uniform of officers or men in the whole army would have passed a regulation inspection. In the glory of that day Logan's men forgot the fathomless mud of Cairo, the sleet, mud, and water around Forts Henry and Donelson, the heat and long siege of Vicksburg, the rugged mountains of Kenesaw, the siege of Atlanta, the swamps and corduroys of Georgia and the Carolinas, the burning suns, and pitiless storms of winter, the marches, the battles, the suffering and carnage of the long four years intervening between April, 1861, and May, 1865. General Logan forgot that he had been relieved unjustly of the command of the Army of the Tennessee after his great victory at Atlanta and speedy avenging of the death of McPherson, July 22, 1864. All were going home soon and only thought and d
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
eived a terrible and bloody repulse. On the 4th of June Johnston abandoned his intrenched position at New Hope Church and retreated to the strong positions of Kenesaw, Pine, and Lost Mountains. He was forced to yield the two last-named places and concentrate his army on Kenesaw, where, on the 27th, Generals Thomas and McPhersoKenesaw, where, on the 27th, Generals Thomas and McPherson made a determined but unsuccessful assault. On the night of the 2d of July Sherman commenced moving his army by the right flank, and on the morning of the 3d found that the enemy, in consequence of this movement, had abandoned Kenesaw and retreated across the Chattahoochee. General Sherman remained on the Chattahoochee to gKenesaw and retreated across the Chattahoochee. General Sherman remained on the Chattahoochee to give his men rest and get up stores until the 17th of July, when he resumed his operations, crossed the Chattahoochee, destroyed a large portion of the railroad to Augusta, and drove the enemy back to Atlanta. At this place General Hood succeeded General Johnston in command of the rebel army, and, assuming the offensive-defensive p
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
plies ample, we moved forward to Big Shanty. Kenesaw, tile bold and striking twin mountain, lay beany of the hills that abound in that region. Kenesaw, Pine Mountain, and Lost Mountain form a triangle. Pine Mountain, the apex, and Kenesaw and Lost Mountain the base, covering perfectly the town his right on the railroad, General Thomas on Kenesaw and Pine Mountain, and General Schofield off e made dispositions to break the line between Kenesaw and Pine Mountains. General Hooker was on its of admirable breast-works connecting it with Kenesaw. We continued to press at all points, skirmi again, strongly posted and intrenched, with Kenesaw as his salient, his right wing thrown back so lines and strengthen them accordingly. From Kenesaw he could look down upon our camps and observeenemy-General McPherson watching the enemy on Kenesaw and working his left forward; General Thomas ss. Then followed the eventful battles about Kenesaw and the escape of the enemy across the Chatta[6 more...]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 8 (search)
n force it into positions of hazard and risk. The services of the artillery throughout the whole campaign have been conspicuous. The western life of officers and men, favorable to self-reliance, coolness, endurance, and marksmanship, seems to adapt them peculiarly for this special arm. Their three years experience in the field adds important elements to their efficiency and has combined to render the artillery of your command unusually reliable and effective. At Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Kenesaw, and amid the varied and bloody operations before Atlanta, it sustained its appropriate share of the work most creditably. Its practice at Rocky Face Ridge and Kenesaw Mountain, where at unusual elevation it was called upon to silence or dislodge the enemy, was extraordinary. Abundant proof of this was obtained from personal inspection of the enemy's works after we gained possession of them, which proof is fully confirmed by the concurrent acknowledgment of the enemy. The peculiar nat
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
bridges had been built over the Oostenaula, at Resaca, at Lay's Ferry, and two flat-boat bridges over the Coosawattee; also pontoon bridges over the Etowah River at the cliffs. The enemy showed little disposition to yield his stronghold at Kenesaw. After the assault of the 27th June it was determined to move toward our right, at the same time advancing that flank, a movement which it was supposed would result in the evacuation by the enemy of all ground north of the Ohattahoochee except Mill or Olley's Creek, and immediately upon my return and report the Army of the Tennessee was put in motion. No sooner was this movement developed than the enemy, on the night of the 2d and morning of the 3d of July, evacuated his position at Kenesaw and in front of Marietta, and we took position, the troops moving right on in pursuit. Contrary to expectation and information, we found that the enemy intended to make a stand upon a line from Ruff's Station (Neal Dow) to Ruff's Mill, the flan
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 12 (search)
ra were common. Scurvy showed itself in an early part of the campaign, which became considerably aggravated during the time the troops lay in the trenches before Kenesaw and Atlanta. As soon, however, as the corn became edible the command showed marked indications of improvement. After the movement to the south of Atlanta, whiche over the Etowah River was rebuilt, when the wounded were carried in freight cars to the rear. The wounded from the various assaults and skirmishes at and about Kenesaw were transferred from the division hospitals to Acworth and Big Shanty and thence by rail to Chattanooga. After the assault on the enemy's works at Kenesaw, oKenesaw, on the 27th of June, orders were given to move the wounded to the rear in the course of twenty-four hours. The Army of the Cumberland hospitals were at the time from six to nine miles distant from Big Shanty, the nearest point on the railroad, where, too, the general field hospital then was. To obey this order it was necessary to av
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